Slang is a type of language that consists of words, and phrases, that are regarded as very informal.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

0
votes
3answers
67 views

Where does the expression “get in her/his pants” come from?

Did people in the past wear super loose pants that could fit 2 people in there or something? Didn't people back then remove their pants before doing it? Did they have some sort of ritual where they ...
7
votes
1answer
87 views

What is the origin of the expression “do me a solid”?

What is the origin of the phrase "do me a solid"? The definition I am referring to: do me a solid do something for someone as an act of kindness; do someone a favor. Example usage: Hey ...
2
votes
2answers
52 views

“I am good!”, different meaning or just sloppy English?

Apparently over the last decades the standard reply to "How are you?" has become: "I'm good." I am not a native speaker but it still sounds bad to me. What is your reaction to that, is it more ...
-1
votes
1answer
34 views

What is the word for offering feedback in an earnest tone that is actually meant to derail?

There is a word for "earnestly" questions and giving suggestions with a hidden agenda to derail and distract from the main argument being made. I've seen it used on twitter before. I think it ...
4
votes
3answers
54 views

the expression is roughly equivalent to “ Cover your breast over the baby's mouth”

In my own language, the "Cover your breasts over the baby's mouth" is such a lovely and interesting idiom. It's derived from the thing that is: a baby cries very much and the mother is too busy with ...
1
vote
1answer
52 views

What does “move his bust around” mean in this context? [closed]

Quite the contrary, actually. Winston Churchill, on the other hand, was terrible to his servants and family, and he was such a well-regarded leader that you can’t even move his bust around now without ...
2
votes
1answer
29 views

How to spell [kæʃt] in the sense of “expended”

I have Googled but can't even find this word sense in online dictionaries. I've heard the word [kæʃt] used in the sense of "expended", such as in the following examples: My drink is [kæʃt]. (...
1
vote
1answer
51 views

Is there a term for this kind of wordplay (rhyming slang)? [duplicate]

Swapping the phonemes of often used phrases while keeping them the same size and structure, for example: Washing the Dishes -> Wishing the Dashes / Dashing the Wishes (or even Flushing the Fishes) ...
2
votes
1answer
84 views

Non-derrogatory word/phrase analog of “bi**** resting face” but for a young kid

I am not normally someone who uses the word bitch, in fact I dislike it greatly. However, there is the concept out there of "bitchy resting face", for people who have a face that looks unhappy even ...
25
votes
8answers
5k views

What's the English equivalent for the Italian slang expression “magna magna”

"Magna magna" is a typical Italian slang expression used by common people to give vent to their frustrations and disappointment with politicians when cases of corruption and personal interest in ...
4
votes
2answers
99 views

What is the meaning of “peel” in this passage?

The following passage from Planescape: Torment is when Ghysis the Crooked is describing the different demons that humans may make contracts with. What is the meaning of the word "peel" here? It ...
3
votes
2answers
44 views

it's good for your dime

I was listening to Moonshine a Kill the Vultures tune. I'm not sure about the meaning of: it's good for your dime Does he mean it is cheap? complete sentence: I got moonshine Drink it ...
5
votes
2answers
227 views

“Everything is up for grabs”

(from an article in The New Yorker about Donald Trump's campaign) Asked by the Associated Press about the possibility of a Trump Presidency, she said, “I don’t want to think about that possibility,...
81
votes
3answers
14k views

Why does “Mickey Mouse Operation” refer to a poorly run company?

A phrase I commonly hear (and use myself) when a company (or individual, in some cases) does something that seems foolish or not planned is to ask What kind of Mickey Mouse operation are you ...
1
vote
1answer
499 views

Meaning of 'jiggelin' - word from the song 'Policeman' of Eva Simons

I can't find any definition about this word. Does anybody knows what does it mean? Maybe some kind of drugs? Here are the opening lines of the song in question: Hey, mister policeman I don't ...
2
votes
4answers
110 views

Is there an idiom or slang for “When you put all of your efforts on something but it doesn't even meet the minimums”?

I was wondering if there are any idioms for situations when you have tried your best for doing something, but it doesn't even meet the minimums or it's too simple and valueless in comparison with ...
4
votes
2answers
107 views

What's the origin of this vulgar internet slang term?

The word fuckboy seems to have materialized from the aether somewhat recently and I can't get a grasp on what it's supposed to mean or where it came from. I've heard one suggestion that it originated ...
2
votes
1answer
48 views

Milk storage freeze or refrigerator? [closed]

I was in some american company and during preparing a coffee I asked some girl with asian face "where is refrigerator?" She got confused and asked me "what do you mean???". I asked with details "where ...
5
votes
1answer
130 views

'Klick' vs. 'Kilometer'

Is it correct to use the word Klick instead of Kilometer in the following sentences? It's about 50 klicks to the next gas station. The US is about 25000 klicks from India by air.
65
votes
22answers
13k views

Is there an idiom or typical expression for an unfunny joke?

Could you tell me some suitable idioms to express this situation: A guy told you a joke, but it's not funny at all. In Japanese, we say "He slipped" or "His joke was so cold that the air got ...
5
votes
2answers
315 views

What is the entomology of “ligger”?

This answer on a prior question points out that ligger is defined by UrbanDictionary as: Ligger An individual who attends parties, openings, social gatherings and events with the sole ...
0
votes
1answer
73 views

Things have been crazy busy meaning? [closed]

What is the meaning for this sentence "Things have been crazy busy" ?
2
votes
1answer
101 views

“Baby needs a new pair of shoes!”

I'm looking for the origin of this phrase: "Baby needs a new pair of shoes!" (Or "Mama needs a new pair of shoes" or "Daddy needs a new pair of shoes"). You see it in movies and television as a ...
0
votes
0answers
33 views

In which country does “protocol” mean school related work or homework?

I was talking with a student online, I don't know where he is from, but he said to me that he is doing a "physics protocol" at home I am assuming that he meant physics related homework, rather than ...
2
votes
1answer
69 views

What is the origin of the phrase “guts for garters”?

Where does the phrase "guts for garters" come from? Example: I'd better stop mucking around on the Internet or my boss'll have my guts for garters. Someone having your guts for garters means ...
0
votes
1answer
48 views

What is it called when people use words like ur and u in place of your, and you? [duplicate]

And why do people say it's lazy and bad? Why do people call others stupid for it, when it's intentional and I don't really think its wrong in casual conversations through text (obviously not speech) ...
8
votes
3answers
585 views

What's the AmE and BrE for “tartaruga”

In Italian the the term "tartaruga" (turtle) is used also to refer to well defined abdominal muscles on the notion that they look like a turtle shell: Is there a slang/colloquial term or short ...
3
votes
1answer
86 views

“It's say to say”

I recently came across an online forum where a reader responded using the phrase, "It's say to say..." where I would expect to see, "It's safe to say...". I thought perhaps it was a typographical ...
2
votes
0answers
41 views

Tuck someone under one's wing [closed]

To quote the sentence from Richard Templar's book The Rules of Life: "My grandfarther had taken early retirement owing to an industrial accident and my grandmother worked in a large department store ...
2
votes
0answers
62 views

Use of “trying to” in place of “wanting to” in the US

Is the use of "trying to" in place of "wanting to" occurring nationwide or regionally? What is its prevalence and when did it start? I'm in my late 20s and live in New England. In the past 2-3 ...
2
votes
1answer
57 views

Offensive phrase: what does “**ck my brains out” mean? [closed]

Does this expression have to do with actual sex intercourse? Or it is mostly used to describe a situation of some conflicts over little petty meaningless things, for example, preparing a work report? ...
0
votes
1answer
128 views

Meaning of 'The Pits of Fashion'

In the musical Hamilton, Jefferson states of Hamilton: I get no satisfaction witnessing his fits of passion, The way he primps and preens and dresses like the pits of fashion Which I would think ...
2
votes
0answers
112 views

Does “mouse” in the computer sense come from nautical slang?

Computer "mouse" is an English term known and used worldwide. Reference about its origin appears to suggest that the term, which obviously refers to the shape of a small mouse, may actually come ...
4
votes
5answers
417 views

Slang or idiom for submissive [closed]

Is there an idiomatic or slang word meaning a submissive person who does everything others order him to do and never complains even when they should, and is ,in a sense, controlled by someone else.
1
vote
4answers
43 views

a word for functionalism as decoration

a word for an element of a design, or an object, that appears overtly functional but is decorative. ie, 4x4 rugged styling that is not functional; plastic bull bars. Lots of buckles or oversized, ...
2
votes
2answers
190 views

“Nice shoes …” What does that phrase actually mean? [closed]

As from the title. I've been receiving this from a security guard, when attending a developer conference, well, a bit overdressed (wearing a suit where all the other nerds just appeared in t-shirt, ...
4
votes
3answers
175 views

Why does “to dip” mean “to leave”?

So, "dip" has come to mean "leave" in American slang. As in, "Let's dip," i.e. "Let's get out of here." How did that happen? The best I could come up with is: a dip in the road obscures vision, so if ...
1
vote
2answers
156 views

Why do people use the term “six figure sum” to mean “at least one million dollars”? [duplicate]

In Australia at least, a "six figure sum" is synonymous with an amount over $1,000,000. The last time I checked, 1000000 had seven digits in it. To quote a recent article in Melbourne's highest ...
4
votes
3answers
256 views

What do you call tiny underdeveloped segments of an orange?

Sometimes after peeling your orange, you notice that there are also some underdeveloped segments inside it (figure 1), or at its base (figure 2). What do you call these tiny, underdeveloped segments,...
6
votes
5answers
660 views

J. Oliver's usage of the word 'bog'

I have a question about the usage of the word 'bog' in the following sentence: Bog standard scoops of ice cream etc I understand that the meaning is 'form'; nevertheless, this is the first time ...
5
votes
1answer
164 views

Proper spelling of variant of “suspicious”

I'm not sure if it's an Aussie thing, but if something is suspicious, then it's sus(s), e.g: Someone added me on Facebook but they don't have a profile picture. I think they're a bit sus(s). The ...
2
votes
7answers
411 views

What is a less vulgar, but informal phrase for “talk a lot of s***”? [closed]

For some reason the phrase "talk a lot of stick" is coming into my mind when I think of a person who talks a lot of shit, but I couldn't find anything when I Googled it. Is there any phrase which ...
10
votes
4answers
269 views

Did British chef Jamie Oliver redefine “pukka” in 1999?

Recently I've been watching cooking programmes: MasterChef Italia (addictive), MasterChef USA (awful), followed swiftly by Ramsey's Kitchen Nightmares, and then onto Jamie Oliver's acclaimed The ...
10
votes
9answers
356 views

“bucking for” .. like Klinger

In the culturally referrent 1970s USA TV show "MASH", about the Korean war, character Corporal Klinger acts "crazy", specifically wearing female clothing, ... because he is bucking for a section 8 ...
1
vote
4answers
111 views

What does “our project has gone to Kan” mean? [closed]

I heard the expression, "our project has gone to Kan", and I thought it has gone to a new location. I was thinking, is there a location called "Kan" or "Can", or is it a short form for Canada? But ...
5
votes
2answers
135 views

Where does the word 'Simoleon' come from?

Simoleon is another word for money. si·mo·le·on /səˈmōlēən/ I once thought that the word Simoleon came from the popular PC game The Sims. However, recently I heard the word used in ...
2
votes
1answer
128 views

Holy holy=Holy s###?

I thought I heard the store manager (a native English speaker, mid-20's) muttered to himself like "Holy holy." That was when the store was newly opened and was so crowded with lots of customers. He ...
1
vote
2answers
61 views

Etymology of adding articles to insulting or negative adjectives

Recently saw Deadpool(great movie), and noticed that Negasonic Teenage Warhead responded to something Deadpool said with "That a stupid." But a few months before that movie was released, I heard some ...
1
vote
2answers
95 views

word for a condescending, snarky, yet awkward and jealous, person

i'm looking for a word for a person who is cynical, judgmental, nitpicking, condescending but also flawed, gawky and timid (in an unfamiliar setting), and is harboring some kind of jealousy towards ...
0
votes
3answers
46 views

Is there a word like “stato” or 'stathole"?

Recently I've heard it on BBC's Documentary podcast (What Should we Teach Our Kids?, 1:14 min into the programme). It's described as British slang. Apparently it refers to a person who is an expert ...