Slang is a type of language that consists of words, and phrases, that are regarded as very informal.

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Non standard english: Slang. “That sucks man.”

Where does the term 'That sucks!' and putting 'man' on the end of sentences come from? "aw that sucks, man!" Thanks!
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531 views

What does “Sp 12” mean?

I been listening to Playaz Club by Rappin 4-Tay. In the lyrics at one point he mentions this: I got a hoe named Real de Real She got a buddy named SP 12, now, you know the deal We getz freaky in ...
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72 views

Which is more appropriate: “I gonna” or “I am gonna”? [closed]

I want to ask about verb "to be" in gonna, specifically about which form is more accurate. I am gonna or I gonna and They gonna or They are gonna
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1answer
58 views

What is a name someone would describe a false homophobe? [closed]

What would you call a person who calls another person a "faggot" in a very hateful way, when this other person is not a homosexual.
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English equivalent of two popular Chinese slangs: 学霸 (academic overlord) and 学婊 (academic bitch)

In popular Chinese language, especially in Internet Chinese language, we use the word "学霸" (literally meaning "academic overlord") to refer to someone who does very well in his/her study and who ...
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Is the term “you suck” always considered slang? [closed]

I'm having a serious argument with a friend on the status of the word "suck" when I used it about him by saying "You suck!" because he missed a train. We are both non-native English speakers. He ...
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1answer
66 views

What do you call people who like word puzzles?

What is the term for, or the name for, a person who enjoys solving word puzzles, crosswords, etc.?
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39 views

What does “do not get (too) vibed that something happened” mean? There is no clue in any dictionary

I stumbled upon this construction: “don’t get (too) vibed”, but I couldn’t get what does it mean. And there is no dictionary that gives an explanation, as far as I can see. “Vibe” is a very special ...
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1answer
50 views

Colloquial American term for “miliaria”

Often during summers in the tropics, especially under intense heat conditions, we get a skin condition medically referred to as "miliaria." It comprises of reddish rashes with several tiny boil-like ...
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What is a word that describes when someone requires a certain quality of another person in order for them to be a possible dating option?

This has been bugging me for the past 30 minutes. It's basically some sort of specific criteria you hold in order to even consider dating someone, like "My girlfriend has to like Star Wars," or "My ...
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1k views

Term for words like “Hanky-Panky” [duplicate]

Is there a name for these kind of doubled words? For example: hanky-panky flim-flam hoity-toity boo-hoo zig-zag Note that some rhyme and others do not.
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Did they say “hand job” in the 1800s?

Did they say "hand job" in the 1800s? I was watching an episode of Deadwood, and they just said it. For example, from episode 6 "Plague": (Al enters the back room, Dolly is scrunched up on the ...
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366 views

Yikes! Where did it come from?

(humorous, slang) Expressing fear. (humorous, slang) Expressing empathy with unpleasant or undesirable circumstances. [Wiktionary] Yikes! Where did it come from? OED says "Origin ...
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81 views

What does Mitt Romney’s “yams” mean?

There was the following passage in Vanity Fair's (May 16) article titled, "Mitt “Bird Legs” Romney is ready for his boxing match.”: Romney also revealed two nicknames. As a high-schooler, he was ...
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1answer
33 views

“Dance it out” or “dance it off”? [closed]

If the one wanted to, for example, dance to forget about problems/to unload, should we colloquially say 'dance it off' or 'dance it out'?
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2answers
111 views

Etymology of the term “salty” when used as slang [closed]

I often watch Hearthstone streams on Twitch, and many streamers will use the term "salty" to describe their emotions they feel when something unlucky happens to them. It seems to be synonymous with ...
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112 views

When did 'the D' for penis come into common use?

I had never heard of this until last year, but suddenly everyone on the internet is using it. I was wondering where it came from and why it took off so quickly. eg. She wants the D.
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A term for products whose “secret” features are well-known (but not publicized)

What do you call those household items whose selling features are purportedly practical, functional and ‘innocent’ but instead are often bought for completely different, and sometimes ‘naughty’ ...
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1answer
48 views

What is/are the origin/s of the use of “to end” to mean “to kill a person”?

Last night on two shows that I usually watch back-to-back on Tuesdays (NCIS and its spinoff set in New Orleans), the verb “end” was used in a way that seemed to mean “kill” (terminate/do away ...
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188 views

What does “True dat” mean? [closed]

I recently read a blog and come across the phrase "True dat". I think it means "Agree". But what is "dat" exactly? Thanks,
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4answers
3k views

Did the English call a fruit “openærs” for 700 years?

There is a small apple-tasting fruit called medlar in English. It looks like a cross between an apple and a rosehip. It has two main curious features: first the fruit must be bletted before it can ...
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About Die Antwoord music and Afrikáans [closed]

A long time ago that I have a question. I don't know if here is the correct site to do it, so I will delete it if I have any problem. I'm a spanish speaker, and I have a good english level, but when I ...
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2answers
173 views

When did “Alright?” become a greeting in UK English?

Who remembers when and how "Alright?" became a greeting in UK English? Do you remember the first time you heard it? Can you remember when that was? What was the context? Was there a particular ...
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494 views

Did ‘alakazam’ magically appear out of the thin air?

I doubt it. But when did alakazam enter English, where did it come from, and who first used it? I vaguely recall the TV magic show The Magic Land of Allakazam (1960–1964) from my Texas childhood, and ...
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'Not feeling clever' - how far does this extend?

The other day, when my wife was unwell, I happened to mention to a relative in Norfolk that she wasn't 'feeling too clever'. He instantly knew what I meant. But it made me wonder how far this idiom ...
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61 views

Slang for giving the way to do something, not for giving the final thing itself

Someone asks how to grow a chicken, and suddenly some guy just drops a chicken already grown up. I need to find an algorithm to solve a given problem, but I don't want the code itself, just ...
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80 views

Can I use 'slew' in a formal essay? [closed]

In a formal essay, can the phrase He had a slew of mental and physical illnesses be used?
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1answer
14k views

Origin of “deez nuts”

I really hate to ask this one, but... When I was a child, some thirty plus years ago, there was a popular juvenile game where you would try to trick a friend into asking a question that could be ...
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1answer
218 views

What do “Bitches get stuff done“ and ”Bitch is the new black” mean?

There was the following passage in Maureen Dowd’s article in New York Times’ (April 18) criticizing Hillary Clinton of overcorrecting her self-image in the current presidential campaign under the ...
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Shake 'em on down [closed]

In 1937 Bukka White recorded a blues song under the title of "Shake 'em on down". Part of the lyrics are cited on Wikipedia: Get your nightcap mama, and your gown Baby 'fore day we gonna shake ...
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1answer
81 views

Is there a word for women who use prostitutes?

Men who use prostitutes are colloquially called johns. Is there a specific word for women who use prostitutes?
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“Down in my boots”

May Sarton, an early 20th century poet, wrote in a letter: "Politically I am down in my boots." What could she mean? Angry? Frustrated? Disheartened?
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What is the origin of the phrase “hot take”?

I've been seeing this phrase pop up more and more in social media. I wasn't sure of what it meant, so of course I googled it: http://www.vox.com/2014/12/29/7417055/best-worst-words-2014 ...
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213 views

What is the origin of “woof!”?

We know that woof is the sound a dog makes when barking. It is used both as a noun and a verb. The word is onomatopoeic but it is also used as an interjection. People woof too when they are attracted ...
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4answers
185 views

We might have to do some “fiddling”

I like the word fiddle, and I quite like the musical instrument too. If you're fiddling with a device, it means you're trying to repair it. It might be tricky because of all the tiny bits and pieces ...
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Why is 'C' pronounced as 'K'? [closed]

This may sound silly, but I'm really confused why 'c' is pronounced as 'k' in most of the words ex: car, cake etc. why didn't they simply use 'k' instead?
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What English word can be used to describe someone indirectly helping you?

For Example, I want to date a girl but can't seem to get to meet her in order to ask her out. Then suddenly we get invited both to a party of a mutual friend who has no idea I want to date the girl. ...
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4answers
495 views

How would you call sitting with your legs crossed but one calf resting on the other knee?

Sorry, perhaps this has been asked before but I just can't think of what this way of sitting should be called. Is there a word for it? I hope so! To be more specific, you're sitting upright in a ...
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103 views

Cockney rhyming slang [closed]

could you please help me to understand what does it mean? "crash, bass, sausage and mash, two kippers and a bonbon, a little dab'll do ya" and also: "Tiddly winky woo" (I doubt if it ...
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What does word “jibi” means? [closed]

I guess it's a slang word, so I can not find it in a dictionary.
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1answer
71 views

What is the meaning of sarcastic? [closed]

I've searched this term on internet. It shows various meanings of sarcastic which means that this word is a slang. However i just want to know the meaning of sarcastic in this very particular line ...
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1answer
64 views

“likes like” vs “like likes”

Which sentence would be correct: The sun like likes the moon. The sun likes like the moon. One of the examples in the Urban Dictionary definition has "Jenna so like likes Tom", so I'm ...
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1answer
142 views

Why does it seem to be fashionable to use the verb “to represent” without an object?

It seems to have become fashionable to say something like, "You've got to represent." Another example might be, "The team really represents for the college." What's behind this? I suppose this usage ...
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1answer
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How do you classify words like 'Helllloooo', 'Hiyyyaaa', and 'whoooooo' used frequently in Twitter?

When looking at many Tweets you can find many 'elaborations' on words, eg. hi > hiiiii, hello > helllloooooo, down > downnnnn. They are not exactly slang in my own opinion, maybe they are but of a ...
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1answer
42 views

What do “the Dude sporting” and “PR dream come true” mean? [closed]

What does this sentence exactly mean? The image of the Dude sporting both a Rolex and the Berlin Philharmonic is a PR dream-come-true.
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549 views

What's the meaning of “I'm slinging mad volume and fat stacking benjies”?

Recently I was watching the television show Breaking Bad. There's a sentence of dialogue from season 2, episode 6 that confused me: Jesse Pinkman: You got something for me? Skinny Pete: Yeah, ...
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76 views

What does “flavor” mean in the field of Information Technology? [closed]

I often notice the word flavor being used on the Web. I'm from Russia, and this word is generally translated into Russian as the equivalent of 'impression', 'taste' etc. However, these translations ...
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What's the meaning of 'fan his pantaloons' in this quote?

Consider... the university professor. What is his function? Simply to pass on to fresh generations of numskulls a body of so-called knowledge that is fragmentary, unimportant, and, in large part, ...
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“to be + gonna” usage [closed]

Can gonna be used without a to be verb like I gonna drink this. ? If yes, whats the difference to I am gonna drink this. What about asking questions? Do you gonna drink this? Are you gonna drink ...
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1answer
114 views

What does Ginga, Gingka or Ginkga mean? [closed]

I have been told that it's a racist derogatory term.