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-1
votes
1answer
37 views

What are the differences and similarities between what “asocial” and “antisocial” mean?

Is an "asocial" guy hostile and destructive or is he just unwilling to interact and avoiding company of others? Is antisocial the same thing? The dictionary says it means opposing established ...
2
votes
1answer
41 views

Is there a difference between “antithesis” and “juxtaposition”? [closed]

My question is as simple as the title, is there a difference between the two words. In my searching, I have found nothing yet, and it seems strange to have two words with not even a difference in ...
1
vote
4answers
154 views

A word similar to hiccup? [closed]

I just had a nasty hiccup attack, and I want to know if there's a synonym for this nasty phenomena.
6
votes
11answers
1k views

What is the equivalent word for “flight” when riding a boat instead?

Example: My "flight" is at 2:00 PM. EDIT I am a Filipino, and English is our second language here in the Philippines. We have 7,000+ islands here and travel by boat is very common, yet we don't have ...
-2
votes
1answer
55 views

substantial vs. numerous [closed]

these two words seem very similar, 'substantial' says in the dic.that 'large in amount or number', numerous says that 'many'. Do they have differences in contexts?
0
votes
1answer
52 views

the similar meaning of impress and strike…as

I learnt a phrase said 'strike sb. as sth.' it means to seem to have a particular quality or feature. I think it is similar to 'impress sb. with sty' Maybe it is most common to you native speakers to ...
2
votes
4answers
119 views

Other words or phrases for “Little Black Book”

I'm trying to find if there are any other words or phrases that have a similar meaning to Little Black Book. More looking along the lines of a word or phrase to mean a list or book where you keep ...
0
votes
2answers
257 views

What is the difference between the word around and round

When I am writing I come across these two words a lot and I was wondering what is different about them and how they would be used in different contexts
1
vote
1answer
46 views

Can “cloven” be used instead of “cleaved”?

Can cloven be used in its verb form like the way broken or eaten is used? gets cloven to give rise to is cloven by Cleaved is a perfectly fine word in this context, but can cloven be used ...
2
votes
5answers
548 views

What is the best word to describe an “object of importance” without inquiring about its past? (i.e. not memento)

I'm looking for a word to describe a gift. The way I am using this word is to describe the item in way that a person who receives this gift would almost worship it because it means so much. The words ...
6
votes
9answers
2k views

Is there a single word which means "turned out to be''?

I am trying to shorten a sentence which is somewhat structured as follows: {something} turned out to be {something} Is there a single word that could replace turned out to be? (example): I ...
0
votes
4answers
97 views

Restrain vs curb [closed]

In an exam I found this phrase: There was very strong support for the police who were determined to (curb) this kind of crime. There was a choice between restrain and curb. Why was curb the ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

What is the difference between a “technologist” and a “technician”?

The dictionary offers the following: technologist — a person who specializes in technology technician — specialist in industrial techniques: somebody who is skilled in industrial ...
5
votes
3answers
215 views

Are effect and affect related to efferent and afferent?

In my work I occasionally write about neurons. A common description of the relationship between two populations of neurons is to describe one as being "afferent" or "efferent" with respect to another. ...
40
votes
5answers
3k views

“Screwed” vs. “nailed”: why is the slang so different?

While the two names nail and screw have similar shapes and functions, why do the verbs differ so much? Someone has screwed something sounds like they have ruined something to me, while someone has ...
4
votes
1answer
461 views

What are words similar in spelling but differing in meaning called?

I frequently encounter "vs" words like: prodigal vs prodigious ingenuous vs ingenious affluent vs effluent These words are very similar but not identical in spelling, and have different meanings. ...
0
votes
1answer
3k views

What word describes things that are similar yet different? [duplicate]

There are two words on either side of the word I'm looking for: Synonym and Antonym. Of course, a Synonym is a word that means the same thing (automobile vs. vehicle), and an Antonym is a word that ...
3
votes
2answers
146 views

The spiritual usage of the word “revelation” [closed]

I translate some spiritual texts and this word revelation is very tricky to translate to another language that really does not have a similar word. For example: "God has sent a new revelation to the ...
5
votes
2answers
4k views

Why are the “donkey” and the “butt” both named “ass”? [closed]

Is there any similarity between them that they have the same name, or is the reason something different of having a physical similarity? I found different meanings for both, but none of them ...
22
votes
6answers
3k views

Are “Fish in a barrel” and “Sitting ducks” similar?

Do the phrases "Fish in a barrel" and "Sitting ducks" convey the same thing? In my opinion, they have the same tone and express something to be an easy target. Eg: Out there, they are just fish in ...
2
votes
3answers
3k views

Is it okay to say “in their own terms”?

As far as I know, it is valid to say "they can produce music on their own terms" when you want to say that a group can produce music without having to answer to anybody but themselves. Is it also ...
2
votes
4answers
822 views

What is a word to describe a person who wears several masks?

What word best describes a person who is deceitful and very complicated to understand? As they say, he wears several masks.
-4
votes
4answers
2k views

It's not proper.. no such thing as “unseeming(ing)ly”? [closed]

I'll keep it simple, as I've learned - the hard way - that schtick does NOT go over well, around here. So.... unseemly |ˌənˈsēmlē| adj. (of behavior or actions) not proper or appropriate: an ...
8
votes
4answers
1k views

What's the difference between “efficacy” and “effectiveness”?

I usually use the word "effectiveness" in conversation, but sometimes I use the word "efficacy" then self-correct with "effectiveness" . Is there a practical difference between them?
4
votes
2answers
641 views

Is the expression 'more alike' awkward or does it work in an interface?

I want to create a button on an interface that will show me more items (cars) of the same kind (or similar in characteristics). I was thinking of 'more like this' but this is a bit too long and the ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

Subsequent, Consequent… Presequent?

Imagine the following: A -> B B is consequent (and subsequent) to A, because A implies B. How might one describe A relative to B? "Presequent" gets a few search results... but perhaps there's ...
3
votes
1answer
211 views

supplant : replace :: snatch : take

The title is an analogy appeared in the GRE verbal test, and I yet can't find the analogy in it. "Snatch" means to "take" hastily or eagerly, but I don't see if "supplant" is a more hasty motion than ...
-1
votes
3answers
3k views

“Rank” and “ranking” [closed]

What is the difference in meaning between rank and ranking, as in "an officer with high rankings" and "a high-rank officer"? I know perhaps there might be a difference in usage, but my question is ...
0
votes
1answer
421 views

Are “rhyme” and “rhythmic” related words? [closed]

When I look at these words, it seems that they should have something in common. The concept behind both is also related. They both denote the concept of patterns of sound. Are they related ...
3
votes
5answers
2k views

Difference between “size” and “magnitude”

Following the comments to this answer to another question, what is the difference between size and magnitude? I know there's a difference, but can someone put it in a nutshell for me?
26
votes
6answers
9k views

Difference between “artifact” and “artefact”

Is there any usage preference between artifact and artefact? My understanding was that an artifact was properly applied to physical, historical objects, while an artefact was more correct for more ...
3
votes
1answer
166 views

If I change the part containing “conceivably”, does this sentence still have the same meaning?

I found a sentence in my programming book: Note that the delimiter does not have to be a bracket and could be conceivably any character. If I extracted the part: could be conceivably any ...
0
votes
2answers
688 views

What does “life plays tricks on him” mean?

What does this statement mean? Life plays tricks on him. Is it similar to He has a twisted fate.
5
votes
2answers
2k views

“Intent” vs. “intention”

How are intent and intention distinguished in terms of usage? My guess after checking my pocket dictionary is Intent is used to mean a bad purpose. Their intent to kill the boy is crystal ...
0
votes
3answers
225 views

A word similar to lofty [closed]

I'm looking for an adjective that means lofty, intangible, hard to incorporate into every day life, not down-to-earth. It would describe an idea or concept. ETA: Example of sentence I would use it ...
1
vote
3answers
540 views

Phrases similar to “what would you do?”

I'm looking for common phrases similar to "What would you do?" I'd like any phrase that signifies the call to action to make a difficult hypothetical decision. For example, "Take your pick" is a ...
5
votes
4answers
673 views

Word similar to “farewell” but with negative connotation

I am looking for a word that is similar to the meaning of farewell or goodbye except that it has a negative connotation. I find it hard to choose an appropriate word when I close communications with ...
17
votes
7answers
11k views

Is there a difference between “innocent” and “not guilty”?

I have always thought the antonym of "guilty" is "innocent", but apparently it's just "not guilty". Even juries seem to agree. But why? Aren't they antonyms? Or is there a subtlety I'm missing here? ...
9
votes
7answers
2k views

Simple sentences that demonstrate differences among similar-looking words [closed]

While searching online for the difference between "sometime" and "some time", I stumbled upon this page. At the middle of the page you can see these two sentences that demonstrate the difference: ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

Any website to look up words with similar pronunciation or spelling?

Is there any website(s) to look up words with similar pronunciation or spelling? For example: stack, steak, stake, stick. (It can help me as a non-native English speaker to learn confusing words.)
4
votes
5answers
1k views

Which thesaurus best describes the differences between several similar words? [closed]

Which thesaurus (online or paper) best describes the differences between several similar words? As a non-native English speaker, it is often difficult for me to distinguish the slightly different ...
4
votes
4answers
3k views

Are “not uncommon” and similar phrases double negatives? Should their use be avoided?

When I think of double negatives I think of phrases that grate on the ears, like: I'm not going to do no homework. I'm never going to not go visit Graceland. There are some phrases that ...
9
votes
6answers
5k views

What is an adjective for words that rhyme or sound similar?

You may say "node rhymes with toad", or "the words load and toad rhyme", but what about the relation of rhyming? The relation between "node" and "load" is purely ____ - they just sound similar. ...
1
vote
5answers
2k views

Similar words that change from “-ter” to “tre”

I just found out that luster in British English was actually lustre. This was something that I did not know before. Are there any other words that behave like this? Why? (According to what?)
1
vote
1answer
387 views

“Let's”: similar contractions

First, I'm aware of this question. What I want to know is if there are other similar constructs, done by contracting a verb with "us".
5
votes
10answers
2k views

What's a word similar in usage to “diatribe,” but not as harsh?

According to the Oxford English Dictionary, a diatribe is defined as a forceful and bitter verbal attack against someone or something. I had previously understood it to mean something more along the ...
12
votes
2answers
5k views

What is the difference between “proven” and “proved”?

My question concerns when to use what of the above.