A sentence is a set of words that is complete in itself, typically containing a subject and predicate.

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How would I change the following sentence to active form?

I've been told that it's always better to turn sentences to active form (at least in fiction writing). How can I turn the following sentence to active form? Sophia was woken up by the rattling ...
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1answer
366 views

Is “either” being properly used in the following sentence?

I'm not a native English-speaker. For some reason, I'm not sure about the usage of either in the following sentence: And it's not that I’m against traveling or studying abroad. It's just that ...
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1answer
2k views

Is this a complete sentence?

There was an ad on telly I saw, saying Relax, knowing your home is safe Is this a complete sentence that is grammatically correct? Could this go in an essay? What is the technical word for ...
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3answers
628 views

Do these adjectives refer to ice?

In this sentence from Wuthering Heights I declined joining their breakfast, and, at the first gleam of dawn, took an opportunity of escaping into the free air, now clear, and still, and cold ...
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4answers
3k views

The difference between using a comma or a full stop

What's the difference between "I see, I see" and "I see. I see"? Can one use a comma in between? The first sentence could be used in formal writing, right? What about this one: "My house, my rules" ...
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2answers
66 views

Can 'it' be used plurally?

Can 'it' as a pronoun refer to many different imperative verbs? For instance, in the sentence: Abide by thy customs, thou excellent one: grind thy corn, drink thy water, praise thy cooking,-- if ...
4
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1answer
278 views

Please help explain this long sentence

It bore an engraved escutcheon, a herald's wording of which may serve for a motto and brief description of our now concluded legend; so sombre is it, and relieved only by one ever-glowing point ...
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3answers
6k views

How to correct a sentence that Word thinks is a fragment I need to revise?

I will be specific. I am trying to frame a sentence to include in a blog post. Instinctively it feels lame and wrong. Word keeps asking me to consider revising the fragment. As I am not a native ...
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2answers
566 views

Is “I don't work here” literal or does it mean “I am not an employee of this establishment”? [closed]

Part of my work involves visiting retail establishments during business hours. Often, when mistaken for an employee of the store, I am asked a question about where to find something in the store, to ...
4
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4answers
30k views

Can I start a sentence with “Whereas”?

The sentence is supposed to be contradicting a previous situation explained thoroughly in the precedent paragraph. The contradiction is on the same subject (in the past/now). Can the sentence be ...
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2answers
958 views

“Something suffices the condition that” vs. “it suffices that something”

In a book I am reading there is a sentence: Our initial version of Cauchy's theorem begins with the observation that it suffices that f(z) [a function] have a primitive in a region Ω In ...
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2answers
501 views

Oddness of sentence containing “since”

The considerable debt of gratitude I have incurred to Mr X since I have known him, has continued to grow during this last period. Is the use of since in the above sentence grammatically correct? ...
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1answer
2k views

Is there a name for misusing a word (e.g., saying “Provincially, yes”)? [closed]

I read a mail in which someone replied to the question "Will he be attending the party?" by saying "Provincially, yes". Provincial means "of or concerning the regions outside the capital city of a ...
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5answers
36k views

Can you use two “and”s in a sentence?

For example, I like chocolate, vanilla, and lemon and orange ice cream. Indicating "lemon and orange" is a combined flavor, as an item in the list needing an initial and.
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1answer
164 views

How should I understand “the idea” in this sentence?

The following is an excerpt from a GRE Verbal exercise: The hypothesis of an expanding Earth has never attracted notable support, and if it were not for the historical example of continental ...
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1answer
2k views

Ask question without using “?” in it [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When is it appropriate to end a question without a question mark? I have heard so many times people use two way of asking question? Is there any way to ask question ...
2
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3answers
434 views

Does standard English include non-trivial sentences which admit no verb?

One of the interesting aspects of the Maori language, as I understand it, is that it includes a class of sentences which not only have no verb, it is positively wrong to form them with a verb. Does ...
3
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2answers
9k views

What is the meaning of this sentence - “Were it not for the bodies there on the ground, it would have appeared to be a normal day at the oasis.”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Conditional sentences not starting with “if” What is the meaning of this sentence - "Were it not for the bodies there on the ground, it would have appeared to be a ...
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1answer
1k views

Is every sentence in a tense?

I know that "tense" indicates time. If that is true, then not every sentence can be indicated of its tense. Please review these sentences: "If I could go to the market , I must have taken breakfast ...
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1answer
148 views

'advance study' or 'advance studies'. Which one is suitable in this context of usage?

In this context of usage which one is suitable? sentence: "make the transition into advance studies/study a smooth one"
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1answer
157 views

Does the subject of this sentence make sense, even when split by the clarification?

I'm trying to be as terse as possible in expressing a few points, so I've ended up with the following sentence: During the summer, my sister and brother, younger by five years and older by two, ...
2
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1answer
375 views

Question about sentence structure and semicolons

Suppose the following sentence: When the sun comes in the morning; the sky is blue. Are "When the sun comes in the morning" and "the sky is blue" two clauses of the sentence? So, is it correct to ...
2
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2answers
552 views

A long sentence from “The Apple Tree” [closed]

If she had long lost the blue-eyed, flower-like charm, the cool slim purity of face and form, the apple-blossom colouring, which had so swiftly and so oddly affected Ashurst twenty-six years ago, ...
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2answers
872 views

Longer than a word — smaller than a sentence

What would you call a linguistic construct that is just big enough to convey a meaning within a context, longer than a word but not having the length and proper form of a complete sentence? Like, for ...
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1answer
248 views

“Odin’s tears will drown the world of men on the day” — what does this sentence mean? [closed]

Here is the passage: The skies will burst open and Odin’s tears will drown the world of men on the day when JaVale McGee’s body syncs up naturally with his team on the basketball court. ...
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1answer
75 views

“To” vs. “for” in “gold for your business” [closed]

As a marketing slogan could the following sentence be considered grammatical? Because happy customers are gold for your business. Would it be better to say to instead of for? Or a rephrasing ...
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3answers
7k views

Is it grammatical to finish a sentence with “also”?

In the following text, I wonder if it's grammatical to finish the sentence with also. it does sound weird to me. The sentence sound incomplete somehow and makes the audience wait for more. Here ...
3
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1answer
191 views

Grammatical? “One in 12 babies is/are immunized.” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Which is correct: “one or more is” or “one or more are”? “1 in 10 are” or “1 in 10 is”? Which is grammatical and why? About one in 12 Australian babies is not ...
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2answers
876 views

What is proper sentence structure? [closed]

I've got a problem with this structure: "Under this term are meant all things that belong to (...)" I wish to know if it's correct and what kind of structure actually it is. I believe it's probably ...
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4answers
49k views

Usage of “in contrast”

I want to explain something in the first sentence and then say some opposite thing in the second sentence. I thought, I could use the phrase in contrast to make the flow of a paragraph. For example: ...
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2answers
579 views

As or due to give same meaning? [closed]

Does as or due to give same meaning? I have written some example case As the reference data is available with a leading company and difficulty of making own reference data, the overall ...
6
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1answer
164 views

Is ‘Today, Japan’s old age social security system is running at a deficit, is the whole country” in Forbes magazine a right sentence? [closed]

I’m puzzled about the meaning of “is the whole country” in the following sentence of the article titled “Japan’s choice: Sink the welfare state or collapse – Whither Japan,” in October 21 Forbes ...
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3answers
423 views

Is this a run-on sentence? Is there a better way to rewrite it?

Since Osan was Jihei's wife and Koharu was his adulteress, they represented his obligation and passion respectively. I see three potential problems: Run-on sentence: There are two ...
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2answers
125 views

“stopping to refill his cup when she did”

Consider the following sentence: She got up to get some of the coffee he had made, stopping to refill his cup when she did. What does the subordinate clause in this sentence mean? Does it mean ...
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1answer
350 views

How to avoid repetition of “due to” [closed]

I want to say that something has happened due to several reasons. So I used word due to to say the reason but due to comes respectively. I avoided it in my 2nd sentence. Would it be ok? Missing of ...
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2answers
1k views

correct usage of 'in spite of' instead of 'although'

It is difficult to figure out how to alter the word although for a case like below as in my report there are many although.. so I am looking for an alternative like in spite of Although the ...
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2answers
77 views

“torrential rainfall promoted unhealthiness …” [closed]

During the monsoons, it rained heavily and continuously. The ditches, pits and channels all overflowed with water... In the (....) I want to say something like: this whole scene of ...
2
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3answers
326 views

“without any core banking words”

What is a better way of saying this sentence? The banker explained the working of bank in an easy way for a layman to understand without any core banking words. The emphasis is on the ...
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0answers
103 views

removing some repeating phrases within a sentence [closed]

i think this sentence doesn't accept by the academic readers as some phrases are repeating so that looking for some modifications. Alternatively, users can decide for which application this ...
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2answers
812 views

Combining 3 sentences [closed]

I am struggling to combine following 3 sentences for a one sentence. I am doubted how to do it. Any suggestions please. a) Most of the above methods often rely on the crown height model (CHM) ...
2
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3answers
332 views

What does “a mission to make the 1 percent 100 percent able to indulge in car elevators” mean?

Further to my previous question on the word, “profile in courage” in Maureen Dowd’s article of NY-Times, “Of Mad Men, Mad Women and Meat Loaf,” I was puzzled with the ending line of the following ...
4
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3answers
1k views

Meaning of “Schemas are changed infrequently, if at all”

As the question title implies, the following is a simple sentence written in plain English. Schemas are changed infrequently, if at all. Where schema is a special term used in Database ...
5
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2answers
1k views

“If you think it's hard to meet new people, try picking up the wrong golf ball.”

What does the following Jack Lemmon quote mean: If you think it's hard to meet new people, try picking up the wrong golf ball. I guess picking up the wrong golf ball must be an idiom but I ...
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2answers
4k views

Starting a sentence with “apparently” [closed]

Can one start a sentence with the word apparently? For example: Apparently he did not pay him back. I know that one should not start a sentence with because, but what are some words that one ...
0
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3answers
541 views

How do you distinguish “have got” from “got” as the past tense of “get” in “I got my car back”?

When someone says "I got my car back" in an informal setting, does it mean (1) or (2)? I have got my car back. (Where "have" can be dropped in spoken English.) I got my car back. (As the past tense ...
4
votes
2answers
165 views

'submerged' in this particular moment [closed]

How can I say this sentence more properly? Suppose I am with my girlfriend, and I say "I want my whole life to be submerged in this particular moment". I don't think that submerged is the right ...
10
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2answers
2k views

What does the phrase, “there is properly no history, only biography” mean?

I found Ralph Waldo Emerson's famous words, “there is properly no history, only biography,” in his “Essay I” being quoted in the article titled “Keeping the dream alive: A biography,” appearing in ...
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1answer
9k views

What does “This change has been a long time coming” mean? [closed]

This change has been a long time coming. So what does this sentence really mean — the change has taken a long period of time to finally occur? Or something different?
6
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3answers
671 views

The meaning of “People say that life is the thing, but I prefer reading.”

I am having a hard time understanding the following Logan Pearsall Smith quote: People say that life is the thing, but I prefer reading. Googling didn't help much other than whose quote it is. ...
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4answers
661 views

Sentence completion question [closed]

From the given options, choose the sentence that completes the paragraph in the most appropriate way. Most people at their first consultation take a furtive look at the surgeon’s hands in ...