Questions relating to the pattern of words in a sentence.

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2answers
777 views

What's another word for considered ?

I was always considered different ? I have always been labeled as different ? I have always been categorized as different ? Is there a good word I can replace "considered" with ?
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0answers
53 views

Meaning of twenty testosterone-charged men [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Etymology of testosterone-charged men? What is the exact meaning of the phrase “twenty testosterone-charged men”? I’d have much preferred her place, as I didn’t want ...
8
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7answers
5k views

Grammar: “Just because A, doesn't mean B”

I hear this all the time, and often from writers, but it never sounds right. I found myself using it in something I was writing. For example: "Just because I stopped eating doesn't mean I'm full." ...
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3answers
101 views

Should researchers be cited by name, or should only the work be cited? [closed]

I am currently editing an M.S. thesis. The author uses the following construction often: "Nanot et al. have demonstrated the existence of negative conductivity in graphene [8]." where reference [8] ...
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2answers
2k views

Is the construct “[subject] allows for [object] to [verb]” correct? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What’s the difference between ‘allow’ and ‘allow for’? ...or should it be "[subject] allows [object] to [verb]"? I am asking specifically for sentences in the form ...
3
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3answers
2k views

When is “will” used in an “if” clause?

Given the following sentences that use will in the if clause (which is seldom with if-clauses and therefore, I'm not sure they all are even grammatical or not). If you will/would kindly lend me ...
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1answer
1k views

Repetition of articles in a sentence

The following sentences use more than one adjective for a single noun. She has a black and white cat. It implies that the person involved here has only one cat which is black and white coloured. ...
1
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1answer
2k views

Causative verb using have/has

I can understand the causative form (quite less frequently, we simply say causal verb) with make and get but when used with have/has, it sometimes makes me think differently. Of course, I can ...
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1answer
3k views

Why is “being ” used in this sentence “it being a rainy day” as a present participle?

The following sentence is somewhat confusing. It being a rainy day, we had to abandon (or simply say cancel) the match. or Being a rainy day, we had to abandon the match. I think one of ...
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2answers
454 views

sentence pattern clarification [closed]

I am really confused with indirect and direct object... I am in need to find the sentence pattern for this sentence. He showed kindness to his parents.
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0answers
34 views

The problem is is that [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “The thing is, is that…” Does anyone know when or why people started saying things like The problem is is that... or The thing is is that... It's as if they ...
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2answers
984 views

Object or Complement

The professor wants to retire. Here 'to retire' is used as object or complement? Also, in "The man gave Amy some good advice" Is 'some good advice' an object or complement?
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1answer
185 views

“I have made an X to make an X” [closed]

I have found in a novel the sentence “I have made a call: to make a call.” The context is: the female main character is on the run and distressed, and to try and fix her problems she calls a former ...
3
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1answer
9k views

Difference between 'taken back' and 'taken aback' [closed]

A sentence is written like this, In this work of Pankaj Mishra, we are taken back to 18th century Europe where ... In this work of Pankaj Mishra, we are taken aback to the 18th century Europe ...
2
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4answers
2k views

How can you use “either… or” twice in a sentence?

I want to be able to say something like: There either needs to be X to do either Xa or Xb or there needs to be Y. (edit: since from some answers it doesn't seen to be clear, I mean that that Xa ...
5
votes
2answers
3k views

Inversion in “Only when the virus introduces its nucleic acid into a cell does disease occur”

Given this sentence, Disease occurs only when the virus introduces its nucleic acid into a cell. Is the following inversion grammatical? → Only when the virus introduces its nucleic acid ...
2
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1answer
285 views

“Seeing the rain come on, we took shelter” — complex or simple sentence?

Seeing the rain come on, we took shelter. This sentence looks like a complex sentence with a main and an independent clause. But the book says it is a simple sentence. Which is correct?
4
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1answer
867 views

Loudly is Complement or adverb/adjunct in the sentence The cat / scratched / loudly

Loudly is mentioned as Complement when it is actually an adverb or adjunct in the site, http://changingminds.org/techniques/language/syntax/clause_arrangement.htm . Is it right or wrong? I have given ...
2
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2answers
4k views

How to avoid starting sentence with “And” and “But”? [closed]

A lot of times my sentences start with "And" and "But" and they tend to run long. I read a lot of news articles and blogs and have not seen many sentences starting with conjunctions, but I don't seem ...
1
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2answers
293 views

Correct way of using 'overtake'

My sentence: My shop has overtaken his shop in business. Will it be okay if I rewrite it as: My shop has overtaken his shop's business. ? Requst: Please consider re-titling the question ...
5
votes
1answer
3k views

Is 'I would rather…' without an infinitive immediately following it correct?

Consider: I would rather the walls remain painted in a neutral tint. Is this proper use of 'I would rather..', without an infinitive immediately following it? EDIT This suggests that 'I would ...
2
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2answers
3k views

Would certainly have or certainly would have?

I have these confusions sometimes. Firstly, which among the following are grammatically correct to use in sentences- She would certainly have loved that. She would have certainly loved ...
0
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3answers
189 views

What are the references of the words in the paragraph?

While reading an article about persuasive games, I stumble upon this paragraph, which I do not understand the meaning of the sentences from the way they are structured. The concept of authorship ...
0
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2answers
624 views

What meaning does the word “remaining” add to a sentence?

From a paragraph that I was reading about the inoculation theory had this sentence: Those receiving a one-sided message showed almost no remaining attitude change after they were exposed to ...
2
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2answers
193 views

'no telling' embedded in a sentence [closed]

I was wondering if 'spread out over no telling how many years' is syntactically correct (Please see the quote at the bottom). Through the help of another forum, I now know 'no telling how many years' ...
2
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3answers
10k views

Determining main verb of a sentence which match with subject + verb + to + verb pattern

If I have sentences Member is allowed to change himself back I want to go to school He needs to stop What are the predicate of these sentences? Are they allowed - want - need, or ...
5
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3answers
295 views

Does this sentence require the pronoun 'they'?

I have the following sentence: There were several dominoes—some so precariously placed that I'd swear should have toppled over. I believe it's correct, but when read quickly or out loud, ...
4
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3answers
587 views

If I write two phrasal verbs with difference prepositions consecutively, can I omit the first preposition?

Give or take away something from someone. The problem in this sentence is that normally one would say "Give to" or "take away from" someone, but what should I write when I want to refer to both ...
2
votes
3answers
338 views

Are dependent subclauses allowed in the middle of sentences?

I have recently finished writing an academic thesis. During proofreading, my supervisor and I had quite a number of discussions related to the placement of dependent subclauses (I think that's the ...
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1answer
362 views

Adj + Noun + Verb to be + Same Adj

Is this a natural grammar or some kind of joke/internet meme? Cute girl is cute. Poor child is poor. Troll topic is troll.
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6answers
5k views

Sentence Construction: “Just Because … Does Not Mean”

I've already found an entry on this here. However, it does not solve my problem: I just read an entry on "cross platform" from Wikipedia, in which it wrote: Just because a particular operating ...
3
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1answer
320 views

Sentences excluding “being”

I am wondering about a certain type of sentence construction which seems to somehow exclude the word being. For example, A native English speaker, he was well suited for the task. Well versed ...
3
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2answers
672 views

What is the correct way to punctuate sentences that end with proper nouns who also contain punctuation? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How to handle a name that includes an exclamation point (or other punctuation)? Pardon the example usage, but given a proper noun that contains punctuation (e.g., the ...
5
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2answers
1k views

Dissecting an English sentence using a pattern?

I am trying to make a script that can dissect an English sentence. Problem is, I have no idea how to dissect an English when the words are not familiar. I know what the nouns, verbs, etc are, because ...
1
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1answer
1k views

What is the structure of “Long time passing”?

WHERE HAVE ALL THE FLOWERS GONE words and music by Pete Seeger Where have all the flowers gone? Long time passing Where have all the flowers gone? Long time ago Where have all the ...
1
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2answers
1k views

How should I understand “There is no way around the fact that …”?

The question is based on the following text: Approaching crafts from the point of view of function, we can divide them into simple categories: containers, shelters, and supports. There is no way ...
1
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1answer
410 views

Volitional sentence vs. imperative sentence

What's the difference? Is a volitional sentence simply a weaker form of an imperative sentence?
2
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3answers
1k views

Is this sentence structure correct?

I'm trying to state in one sentence several things that are lacking. There's no A, or B, or C. What about There's no A, no B, and no C. Are these both grammatically correct? What's the ...
2
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1answer
292 views

“He loves baseball like his father does” OR “He loves baseball like his father”?

When I was learning English (non-native speaker here), I was taught that there is concept called "parallelism" in English grammar, which in my own understanding means that if I want to combine two or ...
4
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2answers
5k views

The correct usage of “too” and “also”

I always have problems in deciding whether to use "too" or "also". For example, if the previous sentence is: Peter ate the cake. Which of the following should I say?: He ate the pie too. He ...
4
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3answers
729 views

Why is there no form of “do” in questions of the type “who knows?”

I'm wondering whether expressions like the ones below are correct or not. I've seen them several times but they don't seem to follow the typical grammatical structure. Who comes? (instead of ...
5
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2answers
8k views

The phrase “let alone”

I notice that "let alone" is used in sentences that have a comma. The structure of the sentence is what comes before the comma is some kind of negative statement. Right after the comma is "let alone," ...
7
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1answer
20k views

Starting a sentence with “rather”

I've sometimes heard people use rather for connecting two sentences where the second one sets counterexample to something negated in the first. This is not a meaningful sentence. Rather, it's an ...
2
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5answers
1k views

Structuring sentences without using the word “but”

I seem to have a habit of using a lot of sentences that involve the word "but": "I haven't tried it yet, but I think it should work"; "I could easily resort to chicken, but I want to see how far I can ...
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11answers
4k views

What's a good comeback to “obviously”?

If someone tries to sound smart in repartee by saying, Well obviously blah blah blah but what they said is actually wrong, then what's a good comeback to that, or what's a good way to phrase ...
17
votes
2answers
901 views

“Some champagne for my real friends, some real pain for my sham friends.”

Some champagne for my real friend, some real pain for my sham friends." Is there a name for this kind of sentence? Note: I'm not sure the origin of this, but it is a line in Spike Lee's movie, ...
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2answers
375 views

Does this sentence remain grammatically correct?

If I change this sentence We could not communicate through the phone. to Through the phone, we could not communicate. Does it still remain grammatically correct? Is it OK like that? ...
0
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1answer
996 views

Better use of “that that” — or not [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How do you handle “that that”? The double “that” problem I sometimes seem to write myself into using 2 thats in succession, as in: "Now that ...
0
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3answers
319 views

Can this sentence be switched around like this?

I kept studying to the point that I became dizzy. Can that be switched around to become this and still be grammatically correct? To the point that I became dizzy I kept studying. Is ...
3
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4answers
3k views

Meaning of “it's long past time to …”

Saw a lot of such sentences (examples below). What does the "it's long past time to..." mean? Example: It's long past time to ditch the use of the ubiquitous bulleted-list templates found in both ...