Questions relating to semantics, the study of meaning.

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3answers
276 views

root words and affixes lead to a limitless vocabulary?

Could anyone explain how a solid knowledge about root words and affixes ( which can alter words meaning presumably ) boosts one's vocabulary? I want to know how it works? I've read somewhere that good ...
3
votes
2answers
149 views

An Example of Lexical Semantic Ambiguity?

As a joke, is A seal walks into a club... an example of semantic ambiguity, lexical ambiguity, or the expression I just recently discovered, lexical semantic ambiguity? Or put another way, is ...
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1answer
63 views

Is there a difference amongst hypercorrection, overregularization, and/or overcompensation? If so, how?

I've heard of the term "hypercorrection", but then I came across "overregularize" in a psychology textbook. I wondered how it differed from hypercorrect and tried to research it. In doing so, I came ...
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1answer
123 views

Is there a group called 'meaningless sentences'?

Some sentences, like I am dead, I am lying, I am sleeping etc. do not convey a meaning. Is there a grammatical class or any other grouping for such expressions?
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1answer
53 views

Can I refer to the object of the previous list item with “it”?

Is it ambiguous to use it to refer to the dog in the following sentence? I was seen driving the car, hitting the dog, and burying it.
2
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0answers
36 views

Meaning in Thoreau's Walden: 'whether it cannot be improved as well as not.'

I'm having a hard time parsing this phrase from H.D. Thoreau's Walden, chapter I, Economy: I would fain say something, not so much concerning the Chinese and Sandwich Islanders as you who read ...
0
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0answers
19 views

What does 'far' and 'long' mean in Conjunctive Phrases 'as/so far/long as'?

I already know, and so ask not about, the meanings of the Conjunctive Phrases : as/so + far/long + as. To paraphrase, they mean 'provided that' or 'to the extent that'. E.g.: So far/long as X ...
0
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0answers
33 views

Semantics question

Context: I am the main applicant. Spouse as a dependant, I am therefore her sponsor. I don't know whether to complete section 2 or not. Taken from EEA Permanent Residence form: "Complete this ...
0
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0answers
58 views

Shown doing: is it the grammatical passive?

I encountered this sentence today. The man is shown robbing the store. It is perfectly clear that this sentence is in passive form. However, if I reconvert it back to the active form, the ...
0
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0answers
140 views

Familiar 'you know' or 'you think you know'

When you say "This place is familar", Do you mean 'you know this place' or 'you think you know this place but aren't sure' ? What about the noun phrase "a familiar place"? You say "That girl looks ...
0
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0answers
78 views

Looking for a word to semantically represent the input data to a template

I am trying to come up with a very specific semantically narrow term for the information/data that fed into a template to materialize an output. data, info, input and the like are to generic and non-...
0
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0answers
219 views

Does the word “writing” denote all forms of using characters to convey information?

In legal practices it is common to deliver a written notice to a defendant. This may be a physical letter or an email. This got me thinking about the meaning of written. The Oxford dictionary defines ...
0
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0answers
1k views

The difference between issue, matter, affair and question

I'm analyzing a text on marketing and I found this paragraph that has four lexemes which are synonymous and yet there seems to exist some difference between them. This is the text (the numbers ...