Russian is an East Slavic language spoken around the world.

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Why is the word “Cyrillic” pronounced with a soft “c”?

Why is the word "Cyrillic" pronounced with a soft "c" at the start of the word, when the pronunciation of the word in Russian and Mongolian sounds more like a hard "c"?
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56 views

A form of grammar- what is this called

I want to say the following sentence, You will now eat, at my house This type of usage, although not common in the US or UK is very common for speakers from Europe or Russia when they speak ...
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2answers
136 views

What does that mean “had you not seen” [closed]

This is an extract from text about restaurant of the future http://www.eater.com/2015/9/14/9310919/restaurant-of-the-future I am confused about this sentence: "You would be impressed had you not ...
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2answers
59 views

Meaning of “The retail stores are a way to help people get exposed to the lifestyle,”

From http://fortune.com/2015/07/23/bulletproof-coffee-funding/ Asprey sees the coffee shop locations as an important way to hook new customers on the high-calorie concoction. As he said, anybody ...
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4answers
278 views

English equivalent of 'стерпится - слюбится'?

Are there any proverbs in the English-speaking world that are close in their meaning to the Russian proverb "стерпится - слюбится"? Meaning of the proverb: if you do something unpleasant at first for ...
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1answer
74 views

Translation of the Russian term “распорядок дня” [closed]

Russian has the term "Распорядок дня." It means a to-do list of things that you do every day or your "order of life" (routine). For example: Get up at 7:00 Work from 9:00 to 15:00 Go to sleep ...
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14answers
3k views

Idiom for someone “not from this world”?

Are there idioms (or single words) in English for people who behave like they have come from another world where everything is perfect and know nothing about the reality? They usually come up with ...
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4answers
477 views

Usage of kh in transliteration of Cyrillic, hebrew and others

I'm not a native english speaker and I'm sometimes baffled by the appearance of "kh" in Russian names and other words (for instance the russian lunar rover "Lunokhod"). In this case, the sensible ...
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10answers
3k views

Idiom for “the first attempt (of something) is never right”

In Russian there's a saying that 'the first crepe always comes out wrong' (literally 'stuck together into a ball'), meaning that you'll have to try more than once to succeed at something - because ...
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4answers
890 views

Equivalent for the Russian idiom “to write into the drawer”

There is following idiom in Russian "to write into the drawer" which is being used to describe situation when writer or scientist writes (sometimes prolifically) without publishing anything. Are there ...
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1answer
404 views

What is the English equivalent of the Russian saying “my ears are curling into tubes”?

Background: Russians use this saying to describe extreme heat conditions in "Banya" when it is becoming almost unbearable. Russian Мои уши в трубочку сворачиваются? English literal translation My ...
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Idiom or word for a very crowded place

There is a popular idiom in Russian for describing a really crowded place: "(there's) no room for an apple to fall" ("яблоку негде упасть"). I struggle to think of anything similar in English, and ...
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8answers
3k views

Are there shibboleths specific to native Russian speakers?

I am doing these days a lot of collaborative writing with a colleague born and raised in Russia, and now working in the US. He has a very good English and yet, as we circulated various texts, I ...