0
votes
2answers
105 views

Does “eff” mean to describe in words?

If one dissects the word "ineffable", there are three main roots in - not able - able to be done eff The meaning of the root able implies that some part of the word before it must refer to an ...
4
votes
1answer
168 views

Words inherited from other languages

What do we call the words which are inherited from other languages (like avatar,yoga etc)? Is there a single word for the class containing these words? As for example, in hindi, some words are ...
2
votes
1answer
104 views

absent/abscond - what etymology do they share? [closed]

I was doing some writing today, and during the final editing process I came across a typo: I had misspelled "absent" as "abscent". I couldn't help but think of the word abscond. I wonder if it's true ...
3
votes
4answers
553 views

Usage of the word “vi”

In the game League of Legends, the character Vi is known for her violent, aggressive, fight-loving nature, and isn't shy about expressing it. When asked what her name is short for, she has a ...
5
votes
1answer
129 views

Shared root to “bobech”, “bobbin” and “bobby”?

Is there a shared etymological root to the following words? Bobech (glass collar on a candle) Bobbin (in a sewing machine) Bobby [pin] (woman's hair pin) I just learned the word bobech last ...
1
vote
2answers
3k views

The etymology of “religion” comes from “legere” meaning to read + “re” meaning again. Or does it? (more inside) [closed]

The etymology of religion as mentioned in the title comes from Etymonline. And that's very interesting. It makes sense too. My question is, how do the phrases, "to read", "to choose", "to gather", ...
8
votes
2answers
2k views

Plural of “abacus”

A colleague and I were having a discussion as to the proper plural form of abacus. I believe the plural would be abacuses and he feels that the proper form would be abaci. I believe that abacuses is ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

Common root of “practice,” “practical,” and “practicum”

When someone practices something, they do it often/as a habit. When someone says something is practical, they usually mean it is pragmatic/sensible/applicable, yet not necessarily practiced. And my ...
8
votes
3answers
427 views

What do I call a word with roots from multiple languages?

As best as I can tell, a good example is sociopath: sociopath — from socio- on model of psychopath socio- — combining form of [Latin] socius pathos — from [Greek] ...