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2answers
27 views

Words in Sequence Sharing the Same Root

I am trying to figure out what to call these phenomena. For example, a sentence containing the words "specific specifications" or "participants participate", etc. Is there a word to describe this in ...
-2
votes
1answer
100 views

Is “omni” a prefix or a root word? [closed]

I always thought it was a prefix, but then doing a google search confused me. I need to explain why a word like "omnipotent" is often mispronounced. If "omni" is a root word, it would be easy to ...
12
votes
10answers
4k views

What is the opposite of an Epiphany?

I think of an Epiphany as a "Eureka Moment" as in a goldminer crying out, "Eureka!" upon discovering a vein of gold (I'm a native Californian (and former resident of Eureka), so that example comes ...
1
vote
1answer
42 views

“Exigent” derivation

I'm working through a book in which I'm to define words using their prefixes, suffixes, and roots, and I ran across "exigent." adjective \ˈek-sə-jənt\ : requiring immediate attention : needing ...
6
votes
5answers
819 views

“Rogative” root (as in prerogative, derogative, interrogative)

Prerogative, derogative, and interrogative all seem to have the root "rogative" (or perhaps it's not a root at all) and I'm wondering what it means. I was having trouble seeing a connection between ...
0
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2answers
295 views

Does “eff” mean to describe in words?

If one dissects the word "ineffable", there are three main roots in - not able - able to be done eff The meaning of the root able implies that some part of the word before it must refer to an ...
3
votes
2answers
780 views

Is there any dictionary that decomposes an English word into prefix, root, and suffix?

Is there any dictionary that shows the decomposition of each word into these three parts, if application at all? For instance, "incapable" is divided into prefix "in", root "cap", and suffix "able". ...
0
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2answers
544 views

“Thou” or “You”? This is the problem!

In some eastern Indo-European languages like Persian specially in its northern accent Gilaki, the words "thou", "thee", "thy",... have a same meaning and pronunciation as English. But there is a ...
0
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2answers
306 views

People eighty years and up

Is there a word for people in the 80+ age group? I know octogenarian means 80-to-89-year-olds. Is there a word for people in their 80s, 90s, 100s, etc., inclusive? Supraoctogenarian?
2
votes
2answers
466 views

How to understand “-metr-”, as a root?

-Metr-, as a root, from http://www.prefixsuffix.com/rootchart.php: metr: admeasure, apportion. E.g., metrics, asymmetric, parametric, telemetry "Admeasure, apportion" means distribution. So I ...
4
votes
1answer
190 views

Words inherited from other languages

What do we call the words which are inherited from other languages (like avatar,yoga etc)? Is there a single word for the class containing these words? As for example, in hindi, some words are ...
2
votes
1answer
191 views

absent/abscond - what etymology do they share? [closed]

I was doing some writing today, and during the final editing process I came across a typo: I had misspelled "absent" as "abscent". I couldn't help but think of the word abscond. I wonder if it's true ...
2
votes
1answer
598 views

Justice as a title … where does it come from?

In the US supreme court judges, among others, are called "justice [name]". Where is this use rooted? Obviously the term comes from Latin "justitia" originally, but that means justice as in the the ...
8
votes
4answers
2k views

Pterodactyl and Archeopteryx: Silent P vs Voiced P

These words share the Greek root πτέρυξ (pteryx), meaning feather/wing, but the P in pterodactyl is silent (in the initial position), while the P in archeopteryx (in the middle of the word) is voiced. ...
3
votes
4answers
958 views

Usage of the word “vi”

In the game League of Legends, the character Vi is known for her violent, aggressive, fight-loving nature, and isn't shy about expressing it. When asked what her name is short for, she has a ...
0
votes
1answer
537 views

Why does the word “inadvertently” mean “not knowingly”?

The root is advertently. That means “knowingly”. Fair enough. The root of advertently is advertent. That means “attention”. Hmmm … quite close. The root of advertent is advert, which means ...
5
votes
1answer
146 views

Shared root to “bobech”, “bobbin” and “bobby”?

Is there a shared etymological root to the following words? Bobech (glass collar on a candle) Bobbin (in a sewing machine) Bobby [pin] (woman's hair pin) I just learned the word bobech last ...
2
votes
2answers
5k views

The etymology of “religion” comes from “legere” meaning to read + “re” meaning again. Or does it? (more inside) [closed]

The etymology of religion as mentioned in the title comes from Etymonline. And that's very interesting. It makes sense too. My question is, how do the phrases, "to read", "to choose", "to gather", ...
6
votes
3answers
3k views

Why A is pronounced differently in “opacity” and “opaque”

When I look at pronunciation guides for opacity and opaque I see the following: opaque: oh-peyk (a hard A) opacity: oh-pas-i-tee (a soft A) Since their root seems to be the Latin opācus, ...
8
votes
2answers
4k views

Plural of “abacus”

A colleague and I were having a discussion as to the proper plural form of abacus. I believe the plural would be abacuses and he feels that the proper form would be abaci. I believe that abacuses is ...
3
votes
2answers
302 views

Where is the root morpheme in Modern English evacuate and vacuum?

They both are cognates (it can be easily proved by many etymological sources). The question is : Is it possible to consider VAC as a common root for evacuate and vacuum (we may go further - vacation, ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

Common root of “practice,” “practical,” and “practicum”

When someone practices something, they do it often/as a habit. When someone says something is practical, they usually mean it is pragmatic/sensible/applicable, yet not necessarily practiced. And my ...
8
votes
3answers
526 views

What do I call a word with roots from multiple languages?

As best as I can tell, a good example is sociopath: sociopath — from socio- on model of psychopath socio- — combining form of [Latin] socius pathos — from [Greek] ...
7
votes
2answers
5k views

What are words called that share the same root?

What do you call words that share the same root (e.g., "network", "networks", "networking"). Also, does the shortest one of them have a specific name (e.g., "network")?