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104
votes
10answers
8k views

When to use “that” and when to use “which”?

When is it appropriate to use that as opposed to which?
11
votes
6answers
951 views

Why does legal English sometimes repeat the antecedent noun after “which”?

Here's a standard English sentence: The folder which is missing from the principal's office contained the answers to today's exam. (Separate question, discussed elsewhere I'm sure, whether it ...
4
votes
1answer
1k views

Can “who” as a relative pronoun sometimes be omitted?

Somebody once observed two things: people often omit the relative pronoun "who" or "whom" to avoid having to worry about which is grammatically correct however, in all cases where it can be omitted, ...
1
vote
3answers
151 views

What kind of structure with a relative pronoun is this?

As Lord Esher once noted, ‘Any proposition the result of which would be to show that the common law of England is wholly unreasonable and unjust cannot be part of the common law of England.’ ...
2
votes
1answer
3k views

Singular or plural verb after “what”

Which sentence is more grammatically correct? He is being tried on what look like trumped-up charges. He is being tried on what looks like trumped-up charges.
9
votes
3answers
532 views

The use of nominative “whom”

From page 48 of Law: A Very Short Introduction, by Raymond Wacks: In other words, you owe a duty to persons whom it is foreseeable are likely to be harmed by your conduct. To try to parse this, ...
6
votes
1answer
385 views

Whoever or whomever: 'happy for ___ has the pleasure of working with you next.'

So sad to lose you, yet happy for whomever has the pleasure of working with you next.
4
votes
1answer
908 views

Omissions of “that” in a relative clause [duplicate]

I am not clear on when the word "that" can be omitted in a relative clause. I only know that when the modified noun is the object in the clause, the antecedent "that" can be omitted. Are there any ...
4
votes
3answers
602 views

What allows the omission of subject relative pronouns?

“There’s some men wouldn’t look at a girl with a baby.” (Ken Follett, Fall of Giants) There is a young student comes here some evenings. (James Joyce, Dubliners) “That’s a smell could ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

Should I use 'whoever' or 'whomever': “I will kill ___ despises me.” ?

I know this sentence is a little awkward. Bear with me. "I will kill whomever I despise." -- This one feels correct. However... "I will kill whoever despises me." -- Is this right? Would this one ...
2
votes
2answers
360 views

When are relative pronouns omitted in a sentence?

"For someone used to the tiny creatures we get in England it was something of a shock." I think, in this sentence, relative pronouns before some words have been omitted. I know rules of omitting ...
1
vote
2answers
270 views

Connecting two relative clauses in one sentence

I would like to write an essay which gives information about the charts but because I am not native English speaker, when I started to write down my essay I came across the similar problems that I do ...
4
votes
2answers
19k views

The use of “who has” or “who have” in a sentence [duplicate]

Consider the following example: It is you who has taken the garbage out. It is you who have taken the garbage out. Does one use "has" or "have" in this sentence construction? Which of ...
3
votes
1answer
905 views

“Put me in touch with whomever created it”? [duplicate]

He created it. Put me in touch with him. So which is correct and why: Put me in touch with whomever created it. Put me in touch with whoever created it.
3
votes
4answers
24k views

To whoever it may concern

I received a letter of confirmation for funding from an English native speaker. She started the letter with: To whoever it may concern, I am not a native speaker, but that sounds quite odd to me ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

“Who is” vs. “Who are” [closed]

The beginning of a title reads, *Who are doing Jehovah's Will.. which doesn’t sound correct to me. To me, *Who is doing Jehovah's Will sounds more correct. Am I wrong, or can both be used in the ...
2
votes
0answers
53 views

“Whom”/“Who” in subordinate clauses [duplicate]

I've come across the following sentence in a book: “I wanted to learn everything I could about it from whomever in the country might have specialized knowledge of it.” I know that the whomever ...
2
votes
0answers
52 views

Pronoun Case in Noun Phrases used as Direct Objects [duplicate]

When I have a noun phrase that contains a pronoun as a subject (of the phrase), but the noun phrase is being used as the direct object of another verb, is the pronoun in the nominative case or the ...
1
vote
1answer
78 views

Is a preposition of place required when replacing “where” with “that”?

A preposition appears to be needed when that is used in sentences such as: That's the store where I bought my computer. That's the store that I bought my computer (at?). with exceptions ...
1
vote
3answers
684 views

Why Do English Speakers Use “Preposition + Relative Pronoun” Form?

there As I'm not an English Speaker, whenever I crush "Preposition + Relative Pronoun" forms in the books, newspaper, etc., it is not that easy for me to understand right away. ... it will gain ...
1
vote
1answer
188 views

“who” or “whom” as a relative pronoun - not always so easy [duplicate]

I take it for granted we all know when to use the relative pronouns "who" and "whom". And we also know that since the early nineteenth century there has been a steady decline in the use of "whom" ...
1
vote
2answers
382 views

Does removing the comma before 'which' in a non-restrictive clause change the meaning of the sentence?

There are many 'rules' on the net saying that a comma should be placed before the relative pronoun 'which' in a non-restrictive clause. (http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/words/relative-clauses) But ...
0
votes
2answers
143 views

Meaning of “that” in “holomorphic function in the sector S that is continuous”

I have encountered a confusing sentence in a math textbook: Suppose F is a holomorphic function in the sector S that is continuous on the closure of S. What does that mean in the above ...