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1answer
292 views

Comma before a participial phrase

I have two cases. a) He sent me a letter written in English. b) I was given a cup made in China from my friend. I personally think sentence (a) should be non-restrictive since there is only ...
0
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2answers
36 views

Subject-verb agreement with prepositional phrase antecedent and pronoun [duplicate]

One of the engineers who design those programs is visiting with us today? or One of the engineers who designs those programs is visiting with us today?
2
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1answer
47 views

Why is “that” preceded by a comma in this relative clause? What does it mean?

As you know, there are two types of relative clause: Type 1 The woman who lives next door is a doctor. In this example,the relative clause tells us which person or thing (or what kind of ...
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2answers
1k views

Should I use 'whoever' or 'whomever': “I will kill ___ despises me.” ?

I know this sentence is a little awkward. Bear with me. "I will kill whomever I despise." -- This one feels correct. However... "I will kill whoever despises me." -- Is this right? Would this one ...
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1answer
386 views
-1
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3answers
207 views

the position of “of which”

**The car, the wheel of which was broken, crashed into a tree. The car of which the wheel broken crashed into a street The bungalows of which the roofs are leaking ought to... The bungalows the ...
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10answers
8k views
5
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3answers
433 views

“Who should be ashamed is your wife” is this ungrammatical? Why?

Is this usage common? Example: In your case, who should be ashamed is your wife. I ask because 99% of the results in Google Books are "the one who should..." or "the person who should." Maybe ...
1
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1answer
177 views

Plural or singular after “what … is / are + plural noun”

Example: "what the researchers are looking for is / are materials that ..."
4
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5answers
340 views

The film [that/which] I selected for viewing

The film that I chose for the class to watch is called The Life of Igor. The film which I chose for the class to watch is called The Life of Igor. —At the margins, are both correct? ...
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2answers
214 views

Using “which” without a comma

This is a follow up from this discussion. I am a patent attorney and some standard sentences that we use include this: The above-recited and other advantages and features of the disclosure will ...
0
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0answers
39 views

Can anyone make me understand the cases of a relative clause?

As I have learned and studied cases of a relative clause, I am now confused with a few cases. We have three cases i.e. a subjective, objective and possessive case, but the below examples don't seem ...
3
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4answers
94 views

Relative pronoun structure beginner's question

I have 2 sentences and I have to join both in a single sentence with a relative pronoun: People visit CityA. They love to ride the cable cars. I am confused by the publisher of the question ...
2
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1answer
48 views

Who vs. That/ Where vs. That [closed]

This is the teacher that we call "Hot Lips". This is the the place that we read many books. The examples using that instead of who and where respectively are being taught. The pronoun that refers to ...
2
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2answers
44 views

is it possible to leave out the relative pronoun “where”? [duplicate]

Look at this question: The Think Tank is the only place in the world _____ visitors have free access to this type of research. a. who b. that c. which d. Ǿ e. where f. when The answer says that ...
4
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5answers
159 views

When “who” is an antecedent, does it need to directly touch the person it's referring to?

When who is an antecedent, does it need to directly touch the person it's referring to? For example: I called Sally, who urged me to move in with her in Texas. OR I called Sally, the mother ...
0
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3answers
89 views

Is the use of the word “that” in the sentence below correct?

A light fall of ash, that it may destroy one year's crop, often pays the farmer well in future years with the fertility it adds to the soil.
0
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4answers
150 views

How can I diagram the direct object placement in “… the watch that my uncle had given me.”

Please consider: "... the watch that my uncle had given me." "my uncle" is the subject. "had given" is the main verb (past perfect). so... "me" is an indirect object? or should it really be "had ...
2
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1answer
60 views

Comparative words after the subject

I'm really having trouble figuring out how to describe a clause describing a subject which contains a comparative adjective (or an adjective of equality). For example: Children [shorter than four ...
1
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3answers
685 views

Why Do English Speakers Use “Preposition + Relative Pronoun” Form?

there As I'm not an English Speaker, whenever I crush "Preposition + Relative Pronoun" forms in the books, newspaper, etc., it is not that easy for me to understand right away. ... it will gain ...
2
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2answers
365 views

When are relative pronouns omitted in a sentence?

"For someone used to the tiny creatures we get in England it was something of a shock." I think, in this sentence, relative pronouns before some words have been omitted. I know rules of omitting ...
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4answers
2k views

Friends “that or who” I consider my best friends

Can I ever use that for people, or must it be who? Which one is correct? I have friends from all walks of life that I consider my best friends. I have friends from all walks of life who I ...
1
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1answer
90 views

“What were they doing differently *that* had led to this dramatic improvement?”

What were they doing differently that had led to this dramatic improvement? I saw a sentence having the same structure as the one above. But I am not sure that this sentence is grammatically ...
2
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2answers
77 views

I wonder whether it is the relative pronoun

Truth be told, I never graduated from college, and this is the closest I've ever gotten to a college graduation. In this clip from Steve job's speech in Standford school, I wonder what is the ...
0
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1answer
65 views

Relative pronouns usage when I am talking about myself [closed]

I don't know which one of these statements is correct: I am a hardworking person, who is always using the latest techniques and technologies as good as I can. Or I am a hardworking person, ...
3
votes
1answer
27 views

Omitting Subject Relative Pronouns

Most textbooks state that subject relative pronouns cannot be omitted, e.g. A: Alan threatened Brian. B: Alan was a gangster. A+B = Alan, who was a gangster, threatened Brian. However, ...
0
votes
1answer
39 views

Correct usage of wh-pronoun [duplicate]

I am facing problem regarding the usage of who and whom. So I want to know how to use those pronouns? For example: who or whom do you think I met?
0
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1answer
42 views

Introductory phrases and restrictive clauses

Do I need to put a comma after an introductory phrase inside a restrictive clause? Example: She realized that because Paul took the money, he was an accessory to her crime. She realized that ...
0
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1answer
37 views

Which word is this relative pronoun the object of?

The following is a sentence from an analysis by Sarah Dillon of a passage of Elizabeth Bowen’s A World of Love. The fact that the tree’s a chestnut then promises in its symbolism the potential ...
1
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1answer
150 views

Omitting a relative pronoun in a relative clause (exceptions and meaning)

Here is a sentence with a relative clause: 1) I gave her some money which/that she spent immediately. Technically, we can omit the relative pronoun because it is the object of the relative clause ...
1
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1answer
78 views

Is a preposition of place required when replacing “where” with “that”?

A preposition appears to be needed when that is used in sentences such as: That's the store where I bought my computer. That's the store that I bought my computer (at?). with exceptions ...
1
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3answers
205 views

The usage of “that” as a relative pronoun

Under what condition should we use "that" as the required and ONLY relative pronoun? Please give some examples. Thanks!
0
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1answer
120 views

So… “whom I would trust” OR “who I would trust” — which is correct? [duplicate]

Consider the following two sentences: (A) The man or woman has not been born yet whom I would trust to write error-free English. (B) The man or woman has not been born yet who would trust ...
0
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0answers
31 views

That and which usage and difference [duplicate]

This is an excerpt from a newspaper. It was this reference to the ICC that India said it could not support. Why author uses that and not which?
4
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1answer
1k views

Can “who” as a relative pronoun sometimes be omitted?

Somebody once observed two things: people often omit the relative pronoun "who" or "whom" to avoid having to worry about which is grammatically correct however, in all cases where it can be omitted, ...
3
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3answers
606 views

Problem in adjective clauses’ grammar

I have read some grammar points about adjective clauses, but I still have problems recognizing the right choice in questions requiring them. For example: All the students ____ do well in writing. ...
7
votes
3answers
11k views

“The way in which”: a grammar mistake or not?

I'm studying English pronouns and my book says that the sentence "the way in which" is incorrect and I have to use, instead, only "the way". Is it true? And if so, why? Here are some sentences: ...
1
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2answers
48 views

relative pronoun usage: “…, not in which …”?

There's the room; not in the room is the man. I want to replace the semicolon with a comma and make the second sentence a relative clause. Is it okay to change it as: There's the ...
9
votes
3answers
532 views

The use of nominative “whom”

From page 48 of Law: A Very Short Introduction, by Raymond Wacks: In other words, you owe a duty to persons whom it is foreseeable are likely to be harmed by your conduct. To try to parse this, ...
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6answers
951 views

Why does legal English sometimes repeat the antecedent noun after “which”?

Here's a standard English sentence: The folder which is missing from the principal's office contained the answers to today's exam. (Separate question, discussed elsewhere I'm sure, whether it ...
0
votes
1answer
92 views

Why is omitting “who” correct? [duplicate]

In the following sentence why is omitting "who was" correct? Michelangelo, who was a sculptor, an architect, a painter, and a poet had a great influence on the world of art. to ...
2
votes
1answer
84 views

Using “which are” or omitting it

A Korean software engineer wrote the following sentence. There are several algorithms commonly used by software developers. But his native English-speaking teacher corrected it by inserting ...
1
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1answer
199 views

Can relative pronoun be omitted in the following sentence?

The color of house that I built is red. This sentence can be written in following way. The color of house I built is red. I can omit that, because that is indicating the house, and it is ...
0
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0answers
62 views

When present participle of verb is not used though relative pronoun is omitted?

1) Dhaka standing by the side of Buringanga (a river of Bangladesh) is the capital of Bangladesh. I can say this sentence in the following way. 2) Dhaka that stands by the side of Buriganga is the ...
0
votes
1answer
99 views

“Who has” or “Who have” when referring to a collection of people in a department [duplicate]

I have spoken with Education Unit who has requested a contract. I have spoken with Education Unit who have requested a contract. Which of the above is most acceptable in British English?
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2answers
10k views

“To which”, “by which”, “on which” etc [closed]

I have come across the phrases like "to which","for which", "by which", "on which" and so on(using a preposition with a relative pronoun). e.g. The chair on which the body was found.. Could someone ...
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0answers
149 views

Is it possible to omit a relative pronoun as subject?

When Casals laid eyes on cello music he never knew existed.... I thought the verb 'existed' belongs to the antecedent, 'cello music', and 'he never knew' is just an embedded clause in the sentence. ...
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2answers
270 views

Connecting two relative clauses in one sentence

I would like to write an essay which gives information about the charts but because I am not native English speaker, when I started to write down my essay I came across the similar problems that I do ...
2
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1answer
3k views

Singular or plural verb after “what”

Which sentence is more grammatically correct? He is being tried on what look like trumped-up charges. He is being tried on what looks like trumped-up charges.
1
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1answer
244 views

omitting relative pronoun in a non-restrictive clause

We often omit relative pronouns in restrictive clauses. E.g. "I am flying to a place I love" instead of "I am flying to a place that I love." It seems ok to omit the which/who in the following. But ...