Relative clauses are clauses starting with the relative pronouns who*, that, which, whose, where, when. They are most often used to define or identify the noun that precedes them.

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When to use “that” and when to use “which”?

When is it appropriate to use that as opposed to which?
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What rules make “Remember me, who am your friend” grammatical?

An acquaintance recalled this specific example from an English textbook, but it is jarring to my native ear. Is this an example of prescriptive grammarians gone wild?
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'Which', 'whose' or something else?

I would appreciate your help phrasing the following: I am looking for elements which/whose/... size/sizes is/are relatively large.
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Singular or plural verb after “what”

Which sentence is more grammatically correct? He is being tried on what look like trumped-up charges. He is being tried on what looks like trumped-up charges.
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“Whoever” Vs. “Whomever”

On the subject of "whoever" and "whomever", I was reading this but I am still confused: http://www.grammarbook.com/grammar/whoever.asp What is the correct use of whoever/whomever in the following ...
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Should you use “who” or “that” when talking about multiple people doing something?

Which of the following is correct? There were 10 people that went to the store. There were 10 people who went to the store. Edit: Which of the following is correct? There were 10 ...
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Is this correct? “One of the things that makes him great is…” [duplicate]

One of the things that makes him great is he brings it every night. I'm pretty sure it should be that make him in the plural, because one of the things is referring to a lot of things and a lot of ...
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“One of the children who was” vs. “one of the children who were”

In the construction "one of the [plural noun] who ...", should the verb agree with "one" or "[plural noun]"? For example, which of the two following sentences is grammatically correct? Or are both ...
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“That” or “which”? Does it matter?

If I wish to say something along the lines of Consider the bear that scratches his head. It seems to me that I could instead say Consider the bear which scratches his head. I am unsure ...
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1answer
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Whoever or whomever: 'happy for ___ has the pleasure of working with you next.'

So sad to lose you, yet happy for whomever has the pleasure of working with you next.
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Can the word “that” be used to refer to people?

I came across this SAT Question of the Day: Unbelievable as it may seem, many individuals that fought in the American Revolution were still alive in 1839, the year the world was introduced to ...
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2answers
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“It is having time to think that makes me depressed” — grammatical function of “that”?

It is having time to think that makes me depressed. In this sentence, what is the grammatical function of the word that?
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“all that” vs. “all what”

I’ve heard somebody say: All what is needed is … I thought the correct way to phrase it was: All that is needed is … However, thinking about it more, the former doesn’t sound too incorrect,...
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Difference between 'which' and 'that' in restrictive (defining) relative clauses

Excuse me if this topic has been brought up before though I couldn't find it. It seems that there are many similar topics related to both defining and non-defining clauses but there is still one ...
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Possessive “that's” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: 'Which', 'whose' or something else? Is the use of "that's" correct in the sentence below? Imagine a frame with two sets of strings stretched across, ...
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2answers
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Ambiguous relative clause

In the following expression, whom does 'who' refer to? The friends of the participants or the participants themselves? "The friends of the participants who were told to order soft drinks" This was ...
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1answer
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“I do not know where … is” vs. “I do not know where is …”

Which of the following sentences is correct in the formal context? Both? If possible, please also explain why each of these sentences is correct/incorrect. I do not know where the best place to ...
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Relative adverbs

I am having some trouble understanding why relative adverbs function as adverbs in a relative clause. My family worships in a church, where my parents married. In the above example, I understand "...
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The film [that/which] I selected for viewing

The film that I chose for the class to watch is called The Life of Igor. The film which I chose for the class to watch is called The Life of Igor. —At the margins, are both correct? (When I ...
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2answers
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Relative clauses: How do that-clauses differ from what-clauses?

Sometimes I can't see which clause fits the best. What "check-up" could be done to make sure which one is the right one? For example, 1) He will do anything that is needed. or He will do anything ...
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em-dash and comma, which comes first

I am confused about the preferred way to combine an em-dash insertion with a comma occurring in the outer sentence. Until now, I had preferred to write: The erosion responsible for residuals is ...
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When are relative pronouns omitted in a sentence?

"For someone used to the tiny creatures we get in England it was something of a shock." I think, in this sentence, relative pronouns before some words have been omitted. I know rules of omitting ...
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Is it acceptable to start an emphatic sentence with “It is he who…”?

It is he who the students choose as the repersentative of their class. Is this sentence grammatically correct? If not, why? I would like to know whether the pronoun ‘he’ can be used in this grammar ...
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What do you mean that it's wrong?

What do you mean that it's wrong? In the above sentence, is the that-clause an adverbial clause? Or a complement? What is the syntactic function of the string "(that) it's wrong"? In other words, ...
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Why is 'that' sometimes optional before dependent clauses?

Sometimes, the word 'that' to introduce a dependent clause is optional. For example, these sentences both make sense with or without 'that': Long books [that] religious people like tend to be ...
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Using “who” for things (nonliving beings)

On an online typing tutor site I came across the following phrase: We're now going to move on to words who's first letter originates on the top row. Can "who" normally be used in this way (to ...
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What would be the difference between past and present tense here?

1.) I assumed you were the type who kept your promises. vs. 2.) I assumed you were the type who keeps your promises.
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Confusion about usage of “who” in a relative clause [duplicate]

I'm confused about two particular examples where "who" is used as a relative pronoun: Example-1: ...people who I have no idea who are. ...people who I have no idea who they are. Example-2: ...people ...
4
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1answer
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Omissions of “that” in a relative clause [duplicate]

I am not clear on when the word "that" can be omitted in a relative clause. I only know that when the modified noun is the object in the clause, the antecedent "that" can be omitted. Are there any ...
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3answers
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Why Do English Speakers Use “Preposition + Relative Pronoun” Form?

As I'm not an English speaker, whenever I encounter "Preposition + Relative Pronoun" forms in the books, newspaper, etc., it is not that easy for me to understand right away. ... it will gain ...
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Adjective clause with 'so'

I can't find any grammar reference to the correct usage of a specifying adjective clause. Consider an example: The physical activity, so vital for the developing body, is often overlooked by the ...
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“What might have appalled us when we'd started our trip just a few days ago no longer impressed us much”

I came across this sentence from a book about a journalist: What might have appalled us when we'd started our trip just a few days ago no longer impressed us much. It is confusing for two ...
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4answers
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Meaning of “And the day came when … ”

I saw some sentences that start with this phrase: "And the day came when ... " For example, the following sentence form The Garden Party and Other Stories by Katherine Mansfield At last the day ...
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Proper usage of 'which' in a sentence

I read the post Usage of "which", and am trying to frame my own sentence that uses "which". Consider the sentences below. In the first, I want to say that variable shadowing is the reason ...
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“that which” used together

When I read essays from Eliot, I find him using "that which" frequently, e.g. the combination which is the murder of Agamemnon is probably as complex as that which is the voyage of Ulysses. A ...
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Does removing the comma before 'which' in a non-restrictive clause change the meaning of the sentence?

There are many 'rules' on the net saying that a comma should be placed before the relative pronoun 'which' in a non-restrictive clause. (http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/words/relative-clauses) But ...
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1answer
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Should this be a restrictive or non-restrictive relative clause?

Which makes more sense in American English? The non-restrictive relative clause: The bed has a thickness, which may be adjustable. versus the restrictive relative clause: The bed has a ...
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“I know that that that school that is famous because of its rules.” — Can this sentence work?

This is the sentence: I know that that that school that is famous because of its rules. I think the first that is a relative pronoun, the second also and the third is a demonstrative pronoun, ...
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1answer
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Is a preposition of place required when replacing “where” with “that”?

A preposition appears to be needed when that is used in sentences such as: That's the store where I bought my computer. That's the store that I bought my computer (at?). with exceptions ...
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2answers
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relative clause inside another relative clause

So if you're making a game that a person who plays Limbo might like, you should.... I heard this in one of the videos by Totalbiscuit. He's a game commentator on youtube. I'm pretty sure the guy is ...
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Ambiguity in use of relative pronouns

The animal ate the father of Jay, who was an engineer. So who is the engineer here? Father or Jay? How can I use which, that, who to refer to the whole object or only to parts of the object?