Relative clauses are clauses starting with the relative pronouns who*, that, which, whose, where, when. They are most often used to define or identify the noun that precedes them.

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Where there are

I want to have a sentence like this: In addition, to efficiently calculate f(t) after adding an item x at position p, where there are q relevant items before, we can use Eq. 3. Is this grammatically ...
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Relative clause “both dynamic and stative examples of which”

I am simply interested in whether this sentence is in correct English. Especially, I am unsure about the use of the relative clause in italic. The specular reflexions of the glass beads, both ...
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Reversal of Relative Clauses

If subordinate clauses can be placed before or after the main clause as follows: They hid because I came. Because I came, they hid. Why isn't the same true for relative clauses? They are ...
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Why is “that” preceded by a comma in this relative clause? What does it mean?

As you know, there are two types of relative clause: Type 1 The woman who lives next door is a doctor. In this example,the relative clause tells us which person or thing (or what kind of ...
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“Who should be ashamed is your wife” is this ungrammatical? Why?

Is this usage common? Example: In your case, who should be ashamed is your wife. I ask because 99% of the results in Google Books are "the one who should..." or "the person who should." Maybe ...
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The film [that/which] I selected for viewing

The film that I chose for the class to watch is called The Life of Igor. The film which I chose for the class to watch is called The Life of Igor. —At the margins, are both correct? ...
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placement of descriptive clause in the sentence?

S1. X can be done to handle the unsavory practice by Y, which limits growth. S2. X can be done to handle the unsavory practice, which limits growth, by Y. In this sentence the descriptive ...
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Using “which” without a comma

This is a follow up from this discussion. I am a patent attorney and some standard sentences that we use include this: The above-recited and other advantages and features of the disclosure will ...
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is it possible to leave out the relative pronoun “where”? [duplicate]

Look at this question: The Think Tank is the only place in the world _____ visitors have free access to this type of research. a. who b. that c. which d. Ǿ e. where f. when The answer says that ...
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“What might have appalled us when we'd started our trip just a few days ago no longer impressed us much”

I came across this sentence from a book about a journalist: What might have appalled us when we'd started our trip just a few days ago no longer impressed us much. It is confusing for two ...
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Successive relative clauses

Is the use of two or more successive relative clauses common or grammarically accepted in English? As in "The man who is sitting in the wheelchair and who has a broken leg. Or "The man who is sitting ...
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'how' instead of 'the way'

Would his parents understand him the way you do? --> Would his parents understand him how you do? is the rephrasing above grammatically ok?
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Comparative words after the subject

I'm really having trouble figuring out how to describe a clause describing a subject which contains a comparative adjective (or an adjective of equality). For example: Children [shorter than four ...
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“I read the news on twitter that you asked me to” or “I read the news that you asked me to on twitter”

Is this sentence of mine grammatically correct? I read the news on twitter that you asked me to. or is it supposed to be: I read the news that you asked me to on twitter. I believe both ...
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Should this be a restrictive or non-restrictive relative clause?

Which makes more sense in American English? The non-restrictive relative clause: The bed has a thickness, which may be adjustable. versus the restrictive relative clause: The bed has a ...
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Why Do English Speakers Use “Preposition + Relative Pronoun” Form?

there As I'm not an English Speaker, whenever I crush "Preposition + Relative Pronoun" forms in the books, newspaper, etc., it is not that easy for me to understand right away. ... it will gain ...
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When are relative pronouns omitted in a sentence?

"For someone used to the tiny creatures we get in England it was something of a shock." I think, in this sentence, relative pronouns before some words have been omitted. I know rules of omitting ...
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It is possible to reduce this relative clauses

I'm wondering if this sentence Optical fibres, which are made from very pure silica fibre, are the form of transmission line which is most often used these days. that the relative clause is ...
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How do I identify “infinitive clauses/phrases” and “subjects”?

In sentences such as the following, there is (as I understand it) an infinitive clause and an infinitive phrase. Which part is the infinitive clause and which part is the infinitive phrase? And what ...
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Why did the author use “muttering” instead of “mutters” in this sentence?

"He wanders away from the group, muttering something about fingers and toes." - The hunger game, Mockingjay. And can you give me the name of this grammar structure? Is it short form of relative ...
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“It is having time to think that makes me depressed” — grammatical function of “that”?

It is having time to think that makes me depressed. In this sentence, what is the grammatical function of the word that?
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How to identify an adverbial clause

I find it difficult to identify an adverbial clause in the following sentence: Saturday is the day when I get my hair done. Is the clause "when I get my hair done" adverbial?.
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“Be able to,” “can” in reduced relative pronouns

I am trying to remember whether the sentences below are correct: I don't know this guy being able to complete this task. I don't know this guy can complete this task. I think the first one is ...
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“What were they doing differently *that* had led to this dramatic improvement?”

What were they doing differently that had led to this dramatic improvement? I saw a sentence having the same structure as the one above. But I am not sure that this sentence is grammatically ...
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Subject Omission

I have a complicated question to ask you. I wrote a composition and there was a sentence like this: [...] then he saw the brother he thought was dead But then my teacher corrected me by adding ...
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“Changes taking place” vs. “changes that take place”

I proofread quite often and most of the time recognize lots of mistakes, but from time to time I see this usage of the present participle and it always makes me wonder what rules should I apply to see ...
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…is both… while at the same time

In the paragraph below, are the bolded words used appropriately? After learning about the entity’s business and goals, Anka assists in preparing a draft policy and compliance program that is both ...
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Omitting Subject Relative Pronouns

Most textbooks state that subject relative pronouns cannot be omitted, e.g. A: Alan threatened Brian. B: Alan was a gangster. A+B = Alan, who was a gangster, threatened Brian. However, ...
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Which word is this relative pronoun the object of?

The following is a sentence from an analysis by Sarah Dillon of a passage of Elizabeth Bowen’s A World of Love. The fact that the tree’s a chestnut then promises in its symbolism the potential ...
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Can anyone explain the use of “in what” in the following sentence?

Can anyone explain the use of "in what" in the following sentence? In what some are seeing as a failure by Japan to live up to its responsibilities as a world power, only 11 refugees out of 5,000 ...
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Omitting a relative pronoun in a relative clause (exceptions and meaning)

Here is a sentence with a relative clause: 1) I gave her some money which/that she spent immediately. Technically, we can omit the relative pronoun because it is the object of the relative clause ...
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Grammar: “It was somewhere I did something” - choose the right option

Which should I choose to complete the gap in this sentence: It was ___________ I first met my wife. Vietnam which in Vietnam which Vietnam that in Vietnam where I think this sentence uses ...
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Using The in adjective/relative clause

According to this link and this one, in adjective/relative clause we should use the before the noun we are defining, that is because for example in the sentence below, I was happy to see the ...
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Antecedent of “it” in “dropped the amulet into the bag and hooked it”

Sentence is: Jim dropped the amulet back into the bag and hooked it through his belt. Isn't there confusion here on the subject? It feels like 'hooked it' is still related to the amulet when ...
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What is the significance of “it did” at the end of a sentence?

Nevertheless, such a generalisation does not take us far towards an understanding of why the revolution broke out when it did, and why it took the remarkable road it did. I wonder why the last ...
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Is a preposition of place required when replacing “where” with “that”?

A preposition appears to be needed when that is used in sentences such as: That's the store where I bought my computer. That's the store that I bought my computer (at?). with exceptions ...
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So… “whom I would trust” OR “who I would trust” — which is correct? [duplicate]

Consider the following two sentences: (A) The man or woman has not been born yet whom I would trust to write error-free English. (B) The man or woman has not been born yet who would trust ...
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I went to my gym. Is this correct? [closed]

Use of 'my' with School or college is correct. Is it good to use with gym, coaching center.
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How to categorize this phrase. Relative clause, Interrogative clause, Adverbial clause?

What is "Where to go" in the sentence "Where to go is the question." Is it a adverbial phrase or a relative clause? And what is "Why go" in the sentence "Why go when you can stay?" - is it a clause?
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What rules make “Remember me, who am your friend” grammatical?

An acquaintance recalled this specific example from an English textbook, but it is jarring to my native ear. Is this an example of prescriptive grammarians gone wild?
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Why is it impossible to put a preposition in front of the relative 'that'?

There are two sentences like below, I want to see the house in which you lived. (O)-correct I want to see the house in that you lived. (X)-incorrect We learned that we should not put a ...
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Ambiguity in use of relative pronouns

The animal ate the father of Jay, who was an engineer. So who is the engineer here? Father or Jay? How can I use which, that, who to refer to the whole object or only to parts of the object?
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Comma before where when the clause is at the end of the sentence

Please tell me if I should place a comma before the word where in the two sentences below. I would like to work for you since I’m interested in working in a leading international school with ...
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Relative adverbs

I am having some trouble understanding why relative adverbs function as adverbs in a relative clause. My family worships in a church, where my parents married. In the above example, I understand ...
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Meaning of “And the day came when … ”

I saw some sentences that start with this phrase: "And the day came when ... " For example, the following sentence form The Garden Party and Other Stories by Katherine Mansfield At last the day ...
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Omission of relative clauses where and what

Is it possible to omit the relative pronoun in these two sentences below? That's the company where Peter works. Mary didn't get what she wanted for her birthday.
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Is this correct? “One of the things that makes him great is…” [duplicate]

One of the things that makes him great is he brings it every night. I'm pretty sure it should be that make him in the plural, because one of the things is referring to a lot of things and a lot ...