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3
votes
3answers
452 views

Can “whose” refer to a first-person subject in the third person?

This question came from a friend. It is from a college entrance exam for non-native English speakers. Link the following sentences with "whose": I was a small kid. My classmates laughed at ...
4
votes
4answers
7k views

Independent clause markers

I understand independent clauses, and how there are certain markers such as however, therefore, consequently which can denote an independent clause. The common example of use is when one of them ...
2
votes
2answers
140 views

Finnegan's Wake: “the least successful of whom was…” [closed]

Does the following sentence sound awkward because of the positioning of whom? Beans grew up in a Roman Catholic household with four brothers; the least successful of whom was the bank president.
1
vote
1answer
92 views

Is Anyone/ Who is used together?

The course is for anyone who is interested in learning about computers. Is there an error in the above sentence formation? Or can we just say: The course is for anyone interested in learning ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

Is “of which” a proper way to begin a relative clause? [closed]

Germany is subdivided into 16 (federal) states, of which Bavaria is the largest. The thing is that my dictionary is not perfectly clear about this, i.e. there is no direct translation available. ...
2
votes
1answer
7k views

“for which” vs. “for what”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: "Which" vs "what" - what's the difference and when should you use one or the other? Q: What's the rule-of-thumb on "for which" vs. "for what" ...
6
votes
1answer
259 views

Relative clause introduced by an adverb

“Your employment at Chent will terminate directly we find a suitable replacement.” (John Brunner, Quicksand, 1967) This sentence is said by a highly formal and stuffy character. I guess this use ...
9
votes
1answer
2k views

Why is 'that' sometimes optional before dependent clauses?

Sometimes, the word 'that' to introduce a dependent clause is optional. For example, these sentences both make sense with or without 'that': Long books [that] religious people like tend to be ...
2
votes
2answers
910 views

Can adjectives be placed without a noun after them?

Adjectives are placed before nouns. But sometimes I've seen (though I'm not sure if they are correct), things like: The item placed there I know that it may be a short way of saying "The item ...
21
votes
10answers
3k views

What rules make “Remember me, who am your friend” grammatical?

An acquaintance recalled this specific example from an English textbook, but it is jarring to my native ear. Is this an example of prescriptive grammarians gone wild?
1
vote
0answers
182 views

Possessive “that's” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: 'Which', 'whose' or something else? Is the use of "that's" correct in the sentence below? Imagine a frame with two sets of strings stretched across, ...
4
votes
2answers
430 views

Using “that” before a preposition

It's correct to say: Here's a nice recording, which I think you will like listening to. Here's a nice recording that I think you will like listening to. What about these? Here's a nice ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

Are you comfortable with who(m) he is?

Are you comfortable with him? (correct) Are you comfortable with whom he is? (??) You're comfortable with whom he is. (??) Are you comfortable with who he is? (??) You're comfortable ...
3
votes
1answer
1k views

Can “who” as a relative pronoun sometimes be omitted?

Somebody once observed two things: people often omit the relative pronoun "who" or "whom" to avoid having to worry about which is grammatically correct however, in all cases where it can be omitted, ...
3
votes
1answer
638 views

Omissions of “that” in a relative clause [duplicate]

I am not clear on when the word "that" can be omitted in a relative clause. I only know that when the modified noun is the object in the clause, the antecedent "that" can be omitted. Are there any ...
6
votes
1answer
2k views

Using “who” for things (nonliving beings)

On an online typing tutor site I came across the following phrase: We're now going to move on to words who's first letter originates on the top row. Can "who" normally be used in this way (to ...
8
votes
1answer
166 views

“I do not know where … is” vs. “I do not know where is …”

Which of the following sentences is correct in the formal context? Both? If possible, please also explain why each of these sentences is correct/incorrect. I do not know where the best place to ...
5
votes
4answers
13k views

'Which', 'whose' or something else?

I would appreciate your help phrasing the following: I am looking for elements which/whose/... size/sizes is/are relatively large.
5
votes
3answers
881 views

“He was playing when he fell” or “he fell when he was playing”?

Which one is correct? He fell down when he was playing in the field. He was playing in the field when he fell down. Why?
9
votes
2answers
415 views

“That” or “which”? Does it matter?

If I wish to say something along the lines of Consider the bear that scratches his head. It seems to me that I could instead say Consider the bear which scratches his head. I am unsure ...
8
votes
3answers
24k views

Should you use “who” or “that” when talking about multiple people doing something?

Which of the following is correct? There were 10 people that went to the store. There were 10 people who went to the store. Edit: Which of the following is correct? There were 10 ...
82
votes
9answers
6k views

When to use “that” and when to use “which”?

When is it appropriate to use that as opposed to which?