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0
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3answers
30 views

Is it ever possible to use a comma after an essential clause? Relative clause

Forgive me if my use of terminology isn't quite right... I'm editing this sentence: This is a serious problem that ranges from elementary school teachers to adjunct professors such as here, and ...
2
votes
1answer
43 views

How do I introduce this relative clause clearly?

As we shall see later on, there are pairs of genes ______ neither gene dominates but each lessens the effects of the other. Which of the following makes the most sense to create the relative ...
0
votes
1answer
50 views

About relative clause

I'm learning English in recent days and I read something made me really confused. The sentence is: π[q] is the length of the longest prefix of P that is a proper suffix of Pq. I see that "that ...
0
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3answers
69 views

can I write “are occurred”?

I want to write a sentence about international crime. Which one is the correct way to write the sentence: International crimes, which are occurred around the world... International crimes, ...
4
votes
3answers
108 views

Confusion about usage of “who” in a relative clause [duplicate]

I'm confused about two particular examples where "who" is used as a relative pronoun: Example-1: ...people who I have no idea who are. ...people who I have no idea who they are. Example-2: ...people ...
3
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3answers
59 views

Is this sentence using relative clauses correct grammatically? [closed]

The winner of the competition is the person who gets the cheese first, which is the prize.
4
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4answers
321 views

Is this correct? “One of the things that makes him great is…”

One of the things that makes him great is he brings it every night. I'm pretty sure it should be that make him in the plural, because one of the things is referring to a lot of things and a lot ...
0
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0answers
30 views

Right places for relative clauses [duplicate]

The chart shows the percentage of usage of most common means,WHICH ARE DESKTOP COMPUTER, LAPTOP AND MOBILE PHONE, of access to buy tickets USED by people from Australia, the UK and Malaysia. ...
0
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0answers
20 views

What is the meaning of the comma in this case? [duplicate]

He rides a bike reading the book. (with no comma between bike and reading) He rides a bike, reading the book. (with a comma between bike and reading) In the sentence above, What is the ...
-2
votes
1answer
34 views

a story to tell Susan vs a story that he can tell Susan [closed]

He could not think of a story to tell Susan. We don't say "I tell Susan" and the sentence stops right there. From which, I figure "to tell Susan" in this sentence needs something that is ...
0
votes
0answers
49 views

Is word always correct in suggesting either a comma before which or else using that?

In Microsoft Word, the grammar engine suggests before the use of which that a comma be placed or alternatively, to replace it with that and not use a comma. Does the meaning of a sentence ever change ...
1
vote
1answer
38 views

“Where's the servant whose business it is to answer the door?”

“Where's the servant whose business it is to answer the door?" I just read this in Through the Looking Glass. If I said that sentence, I would have said "business is". Why is the 'it' necessary? ...
3
votes
3answers
209 views

Using “is” versus “are” in a relative clause

I have run into a small question that I would like to check. When referring to one person out of a group, would one use "is" or "are"? For example: I know you are one of the members that is ...
1
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1answer
28 views

Should this relative clause, headed by 'where', be joined to the main clause? (1786 UK)

Source: p 174, The Catholic Christian Instructed in the Sacraments ..., by Richard Challoner, 1786 Q. But does not Christ say, concerning continency, St. Matt. xix. 11, 'All men cannot receive ...
0
votes
4answers
84 views

By which? - Problem with relative clause

for hours I've been scouring the internet for some sentences/grammar rules which bother me. Unfortunately, I couldn't find the answer, and that's why I decided to ask here. Are sentences 1) and 2) ...
0
votes
1answer
33 views

Leave-out in relative pronoun usage

Original reference: http://edition.cnn.com/2015/02/03/world/taiwan-plane-crash-transasia/index.html?hpt=ob_galleryfooterexpansion&iref=obnetwork In this case of usages of relative pronouns, ...
1
vote
1answer
75 views

Weird “genitive of relative pronoun” construction

In this youtube-video a non native speaker of English said the following sentence ... another verb, of which I've already talked about the present tense At first, I thought it was simply a ...
1
vote
1answer
32 views

What is the head noun in 'the number of' phrases?

What is the head noun in the noun phrase 'the number of koalas'? My concern is with the non-defining relative clause and the assignment of 'which' to one of the nouns in the NP. My sentences read: ...
-3
votes
3answers
97 views

a nonrestrictive appositive with a restrictive clause [closed]

Jim's cousin, an olympic athlete, who lives in Boston did X. The nonrestrictive appositive "an olympic athlete" is combined with a restrictive clause "who lives in Boston." Since the comma ...
1
vote
1answer
44 views

introduce a restrictive clause without using that [duplicate]

That/which/who are commonly used to introduce a restrictive clause. But some sentences sound fine even without it. Example: John received medicines under development in the research lab. OR ...
1
vote
1answer
101 views

omitting relative pronoun in a non-restrictive clause

We often omit relative pronouns in restrictive clauses. E.g. "I am flying to a place I love" instead of "I am flying to a place that I love." It seems ok to omit the which/who in the following. But ...
0
votes
2answers
46 views

Can the non-restrictive clause NOT be next to the noun it modifies?

The idea was borrowed from finance companies' high-efficiency routine of aligning business processes to achieve optimal growth, which abused the local laws to limit competition. The idea was ...
1
vote
2answers
79 views

Using relative pronoun “who” with “team” or “bunch”

I would like to know if this sentence is grammatical, with its usage of the relative pronoun who. (I) Our team is a happy bunch who works night and day. I am getting two parses for this sentence: ...
0
votes
2answers
66 views

placement of descriptive clause in the sentence?

S1. X can be done to handle the unsavory practice by Y, which limits growth. S2. X can be done to handle the unsavory practice, which limits growth, by Y. In this sentence the descriptive ...
2
votes
1answer
82 views

Issue with the subject-verb agreement in the nonrestrictive clause?

Reading was very important to John's parents, both of them firsts in their families to go to college. Is the nonrestrictive/relative clause "both of them firsts in their families to go to ...
0
votes
2answers
100 views

A non-defining relative clause sentence

My question is something to do with non-defining relative clauses.. One online friend of Breck's claimed the teenager had been groomed by Daynes, who he described as a 'control freak' So is ...
0
votes
1answer
60 views

Delayed relative clause

Consider the following phrase taken from a draft of my master's thesis: In this chapter, the fundamental physiological principles will be presented that underlie the mathematical models and ...
2
votes
2answers
121 views

What's usage of 'to' following 'which' in a relative clause?

I see a sentence in a commercial article Then in 2006, Amazon launched its Elastic Compute cloud (EC2) as a commercial web service that allows small companies and individuals to rent computers ...
2
votes
1answer
91 views

Is this sentence grammatically correct? “Isn't it only you who have that book?”

Instead of saying: "It's only you who have that book, isn't it?" can we say, "Isn't it only you who have that book?"
1
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1answer
46 views

Is a relative clause always a permission for “the” article to be used before its antecedent?

I have noticed that most often a relative pronoun such as who, which, etc. is used to further inform the reader about its preceding noun or noun phrase, e.g. 1-Do you know the girl who is ...
3
votes
1answer
121 views

Idiomatic usage of “of which”

Taken from the Barron's SAT prep book: "Ron liked to play word games, of which he found crossword puzzles particularly satisfying." According to the answers this is an unidiomatic phrase ...
1
vote
1answer
79 views

Is “What the problem isn't, is that they're too attentive” an oxymoron?

This is a very slightly tongue in cheek question with some interesting, hopefully, grammatical side-effects: Is the following an oxymoron? What the problem isn't, is that they're too attentive. ...
8
votes
3answers
249 views

How to categorize this phrase. Relative clause, Interrogative clause, Adverbial clause?

What is "Where to go" in the sentence "Where to go is the question." Is it a adverbial phrase or a relative clause? And what is "Why go" in the sentence "Why go when you can stay?" - is it a clause?
0
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0answers
123 views

the use of relative clauses, 'comma which'

"In regard to the western lodges, six cottages lie in a circle, approximately 100 metres away from the beach in the west, which is conducive to those who want to relax and swim." I'm not quite sure ...
0
votes
2answers
38 views

Non-restrictive clause and identification

Here is a situation: A: Hey, who is that girl? The one with the blue backpack. B: She is Susan, the daughter of Mr. Norman. In this case, should Susan be the only daughter of Mr. Norman or she could ...
2
votes
2answers
221 views

Relative clauses: How do that-clauses differ from what-clauses?

Sometimes I can't see which clause fits the best. What "check-up" could be done to make sure which one is the right one? For example, 1) He will do anything that is needed. or He will do anything ...
2
votes
4answers
92 views

Alternative way to phrase the relative clause “which I don't find X to be”

I wrote down the following sentence. But I think it's quite awkward. Besides, Google tells me that the clause which I don't find him to be occurs only twice across the internet. He'll do this if ...
-1
votes
1answer
100 views

“While standing” vs. “stood”

Original: I didn't react to her pessimism ,and tolerated her pessimism. I didn't react to and tolerated her pessimism I didn't react to while I was tolerating her pessimism. Would you tell me if ...
2
votes
1answer
190 views

Correct usage of *which* and *that* [duplicate]

I keep seeing written usage of which in cases where the writer clearly intends it to be restrictive. For example: "Is there a word which means whatever you want it to mean? Or has no meaning?" "It ...
2
votes
1answer
50 views

Can “which” and its antecedent be used together in a sentence for reading clarity?

Unfortunately I could not find an authentic example of the rare construct I have in mind, but I am just as sure as I am typing this question that I have read so many sentences from older prose where ...
1
vote
1answer
166 views

The relative pronoun “which” and the omission in this sentence

The complete sentence: Yet I should point out before I proceed with this line that when I use ‘ideology,’ I do not mean to imply the now-familiar sinister connotations of mischief or falsehood ...
1
vote
3answers
158 views

'Which were a size too small.' or 'which size were too small.' Which one is correct?

The whole sentence is Mr Boxell had deliberately sold the man a pair of shoes which were a size too small, knowing he would return them next day! I'm so confused about which were a size too ...
1
vote
1answer
76 views

Is ”what there is a reason to do” a valid construct?

From page 76 of Frederick Schauer’s Thinking Like a Lawyer: What there is a reason to do is different from what should be done, all things considered, just as what there is a right to do is ...
1
vote
2answers
135 views

“One of the children who was” vs. “one of the children who were”

In the construction "one of the [plural noun] who ...", should the verb agree with "one" or "[plural noun]"? For example, which of the two following sentences is grammatically correct? Or are both ...
2
votes
1answer
242 views

Dependent clause after pronoun

This question arose from why sentence #1 is correct and why sentence #2 is incorrect - I pity those who lost their money in gambling. I pity them who lost their money in gambling. I have ...
2
votes
3answers
121 views

plural objects and relative clause

If you have two objects which are plural (e.g. apples and oranges) and a non-restrictive relative clause, to which does the relative clause refer? E.g.: He noticed the apples and oranges, which ...
1
vote
2answers
210 views

Does removing the comma before 'which' in a non-restrictive clause change the meaning of the sentence?

There are many 'rules' on the net saying that a comma should be placed before the relative pronoun 'which' in a non-restrictive clause. (http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/words/relative-clauses) But ...
1
vote
2answers
133 views

how to explain the word “that” used in this sentence

Only, she began to be afraid of the ghastly white tombstones, that peculiar loathsome whiteness of carrara marble, detestable as false teeth, which stuck up on the hillside under tevershall church, ...
8
votes
1answer
152 views

“IT projects gone awry…” Qualifying a reduced relative clause rule

"IT projects gone awry because they were conceived on too massive a scale, and good money thrown after bad, are financial nuisances far from unique to the Beeb." ['Beeb' = BBC] I've been trying to ...
2
votes
1answer
110 views

Choice of relative pronouns: 'who' and/or 'that' for people?

Albert Einstein is a German-born theoretical physicist. He became world-famous for his general theory of relativity. If you turn these two sentences into one, a main clause + a relative clause, you ...