Relative clauses are clauses starting with the relative pronouns who*, that, which, whose, where, when. They are most often used to define or identify the noun that precedes them.

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Can anyone explain the use of “in what” in the following sentence?

Can anyone explain the use of "in what" in the following sentence? In what some are seeing as a failure by Japan to live up to its responsibilities as a world power, only 11 refugees out of 5,000 ...
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31 views

Which word is this relative pronoun the object of?

The following is a sentence from an analysis by Sarah Dillon of a passage of Elizabeth Bowen’s A World of Love. The fact that the tree’s a chestnut then promises in its symbolism the potential ...
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37 views

Omitting a relative pronoun in a relative clause (exceptions and meaning)

Here is a sentence with a relative clause: 1) I gave her some money which/that she spent immediately. Technically, we can omit the relative pronoun because it is the object of the relative clause ...
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23 views

Grammar: “It was somewhere I did something” - choose the right option

Which should I choose to complete the gap in this sentence: It was ___________ I first met my wife. Vietnam which in Vietnam which Vietnam that in Vietnam where I think this sentence uses ...
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33 views

Where there are

I want to have a sentence like this: In addition, to efficiently calculate f(t) after adding an item x at position p, where there are q relevant items before, we can use Eq. 3. Is this grammatically ...
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2answers
26 views

Using The in adjective/relative clause

According to this link and this one, in adjective/relative clause we should use the before the noun we are defining, that is because for example in the sentence below, I was happy to see the ...
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2answers
181 views

Antecedent of “it” in “dropped the amulet into the bag and hooked it”

Sentence is: Jim dropped the amulet back into the bag and hooked it through his belt. Isn't there confusion here on the subject? It feels like 'hooked it' is still related to the amulet when ...
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2answers
71 views

What is the significance of “it did” at the end of a sentence?

Nevertheless, such a generalisation does not take us far towards an understanding of why the revolution broke out when it did, and why it took the remarkable road it did. I wonder why the last ...
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47 views

Is a preposition of place required when replacing “where” with “that”?

A preposition appears to be needed when that is used in sentences such as: That's the store where I bought my computer. That's the store that I bought my computer (at?). with exceptions ...
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33 views

I went to my gym. Is this correct? [closed]

Use of 'my' with School or college is correct. Is it good to use with gym, coaching center.
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70 views

So… “whom I would trust” OR “who I would trust” — which is correct? [duplicate]

Consider the following two sentences: (A) The man or woman has not been born yet whom I would trust to write error-free English. (B) The man or woman has not been born yet who would trust ...
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2answers
51 views

Why is it impossible to put a preposition in front of the relative 'that'?

There are two sentences like below, I want to see the house in which you lived. (O)-correct I want to see the house in that you lived. (X)-incorrect We learned that we should not put a ...
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97 views

Comma before where when the clause is at the end of the sentence

Please tell me if I should place a comma before the word where in the two sentences below. I would like to work for you since I’m interested in working in a leading international school with ...
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3answers
94 views

Relative adverbs

I am having some trouble understanding why relative adverbs function as adverbs in a relative clause. My family worships in a church, where my parents married. In the above example, I understand ...
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4answers
132 views

Meaning of “And the day came when … ”

I saw some sentences that start with this phrase: "And the day came when ... " For example, the following sentence form The Garden Party and Other Stories by Katherine Mansfield At last the day ...
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1answer
38 views

“Changes taking place” vs. “changes that take place”

I proofread quite often and most of the time recognize lots of mistakes, but from time to time I see this usage of the present participle and it always makes me wonder what rules should I apply to see ...
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22 views

Omission of relative clauses where and what

Is it possible to omit the relative pronoun in these two sentences below? That's the company where Peter works. Mary didn't get what she wanted for her birthday.
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1answer
164 views

Is this grammatical? “You are who I love.”

I've just got wondering if this sentence is grammatically correct: You are who I love. This is what I am thinking: Let's focus on the who clause, then you can find that the missing element ...
6
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221 views

Commas with nested subordinate clauses both of which are restrictive (essential to the meaning)

I have been grappling with the question below for a while now, so hope that you can shed some light on it. Do we need the first comma (the one in brackets below) in the restrictive nested ...
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44 views

relative pronoun usage: “…, not in which …”?

There's the room; not in the room is the man. I want to replace the semicolon with a comma and make the second sentence a relative clause. Is it okay to change it as: There's the ...
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46 views

Is it wrong: “in which is the man”?

In the room is the man, This is grammatically correct, no doubt . "In the room" works as adverb clause and the verb and subject are inverted. In the normal way, it's written as In the room, ...
2
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1answer
50 views

How to write just 1 sentence that has 2 or more relative clauses? [closed]

Let see this sentence: Most people, who drink cold water, I knew, have never got any sore throat. am i writing the above sentence correctly? The above sentence can be broken down as following: ...
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1answer
71 views

Should I use 'which' or 'that'? [duplicate]

I have been reading up on the correct use of 'which' and 'that' but I am still struggling. I am unsure if 'must be taken regularly' is restrictive or not. Both 'which' and 'that' sound correct to me. ...
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“to become as an instructor” OR “to become an instructor”? [closed]

When she was 14 years old, she even earned a black belt in karate. Also, she got a special training, exclusive for disabled people to become as an instructor." Should I rewrite the same sentence ...
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3answers
286 views

Why Do English Speakers Use “Preposition + Relative Pronoun” Form?

there As I'm not an English Speaker, whenever I crush "Preposition + Relative Pronoun" forms in the books, newspaper, etc., it is not that easy for me to understand right away. ... it will gain ...
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3answers
88 views

Is it ever possible to use a comma after an essential clause?

Forgive me if my use of terminology isn't quite right... I'm editing this sentence: This is a serious problem that ranges from elementary school teachers to adjunct professors such as here, and ...
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1answer
49 views

How do I introduce this relative clause clearly?

As we shall see later on, there are pairs of genes ______ neither gene dominates but each lessens the effects of the other. Which of the following makes the most sense to create the relative ...
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1answer
77 views

About relative clause

I'm learning English in recent days and I read something made me really confused. The sentence is: π[q] is the length of the longest prefix of P that is a proper suffix of Pq. I see that "that ...
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135 views

can I write “are occurred”?

I want to write a sentence about international crime. Which one is the correct way to write the sentence: International crimes, which are occurred around the world... International crimes, ...
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3answers
153 views

Confusion about usage of “who” in a relative clause [duplicate]

I'm confused about two particular examples where "who" is used as a relative pronoun: Example-1: ...people who I have no idea who are. ...people who I have no idea who they are. Example-2: ...people ...
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3answers
75 views

Is this sentence using relative clauses correct grammatically? [closed]

The winner of the competition is the person who gets the cheese first, which is the prize.
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4answers
2k views

Is this correct? “One of the things that makes him great is…”

One of the things that makes him great is he brings it every night. I'm pretty sure it should be that make him in the plural, because one of the things is referring to a lot of things and a lot ...
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0answers
30 views

Right places for relative clauses [duplicate]

The chart shows the percentage of usage of most common means,WHICH ARE DESKTOP COMPUTER, LAPTOP AND MOBILE PHONE, of access to buy tickets USED by people from Australia, the UK and Malaysia. ...
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What is the meaning of the comma in this case? [duplicate]

He rides a bike reading the book. (with no comma between bike and reading) He rides a bike, reading the book. (with a comma between bike and reading) In the sentence above, What is the ...
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79 views

a story to tell Susan vs a story that he can tell Susan [closed]

He could not think of a story to tell Susan. We don't say "I tell Susan" and the sentence stops right there. From which, I figure "to tell Susan" in this sentence needs something that is ...
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1answer
144 views

Is Word always correct in suggesting either a comma before 'which' or else using 'that'?

In Microsoft Word, the grammar engine in certain situations suggests either placing a comma before which or replacing it with that (and not using a comma). Does the meaning of a sentence ever change ...
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1answer
52 views

“Where's the servant whose business it is to answer the door?”

“Where's the servant whose business it is to answer the door?" I just read this in Through the Looking Glass. If I said that sentence, I would have said "business is". Why is the 'it' necessary? ...
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608 views

Using “is” versus “are” in a relative clause

I have run into a small question that I would like to check. When referring to one person out of a group, would one use "is" or "are"? For example: I know you are one of the members that is ...
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1answer
37 views

Should this relative clause, headed by 'where', be joined to the main clause? (1786 UK)

Source: p 174, The Catholic Christian Instructed in the Sacraments ..., by Richard Challoner, 1786 Q. But does not Christ say, concerning continency, St. Matt. xix. 11, 'All men cannot receive ...
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4answers
177 views

By which? - Problem with relative clause

for hours I've been scouring the internet for some sentences/grammar rules which bother me. Unfortunately, I couldn't find the answer, and that's why I decided to ask here. Are sentences 1) and 2) ...
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1answer
49 views

Leave-out in relative pronoun usage

Original reference: http://edition.cnn.com/2015/02/03/world/taiwan-plane-crash-transasia/index.html?hpt=ob_galleryfooterexpansion&iref=obnetwork In this case of usages of relative pronouns, ...
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1answer
116 views

Weird “genitive of relative pronoun” construction

In this youtube-video a non native speaker of English said the following sentence ... another verb, of which I've already talked about the present tense At first, I thought it was simply a ...
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1answer
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What is the head noun in 'the number of' phrases?

What is the head noun in the noun phrase 'the number of koalas'? My concern is with the non-defining relative clause and the assignment of 'which' to one of the nouns in the NP. My sentences read: ...
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3answers
129 views

a nonrestrictive appositive with a restrictive clause [closed]

Jim's cousin, an olympic athlete, who lives in Boston did X. The nonrestrictive appositive "an olympic athlete" is combined with a restrictive clause "who lives in Boston." Since the comma ...
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1answer
54 views

introduce a restrictive clause without using that [duplicate]

That/which/who are commonly used to introduce a restrictive clause. But some sentences sound fine even without it. Example: John received medicines under development in the research lab. OR ...
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1answer
178 views

omitting relative pronoun in a non-restrictive clause

We often omit relative pronouns in restrictive clauses. E.g. "I am flying to a place I love" instead of "I am flying to a place that I love." It seems ok to omit the which/who in the following. But ...
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2answers
55 views

Can the non-restrictive clause NOT be next to the noun it modifies?

The idea was borrowed from finance companies' high-efficiency routine of aligning business processes to achieve optimal growth, which abused the local laws to limit competition. The idea was ...
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121 views

Using relative pronoun “who” with “team” or “bunch”

I would like to know if this sentence is grammatical, with its usage of the relative pronoun who. (I) Our team is a happy bunch who works night and day. I am getting two parses for this sentence: ...
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159 views

placement of descriptive clause in the sentence?

S1. X can be done to handle the unsavory practice by Y, which limits growth. S2. X can be done to handle the unsavory practice, which limits growth, by Y. In this sentence the descriptive ...
2
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1answer
109 views

Issue with the subject-verb agreement in the nonrestrictive clause?

Reading was very important to John's parents, both of them firsts in their families to go to college. Is the nonrestrictive/relative clause "both of them firsts in their families to go to ...