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12
votes
5answers
6k views

You can contact John, Jane or me (myself) for more information [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When is it correct to use “yourself” and “myself” (versus “you” and “me”)? In a conversation, how is is correct to say: ...
8
votes
2answers
1k views

How should I avoid this reflexive pronoun, or is it okay?

I typed a sentence in Microsoft Word as: o Each mobile operating system implements encryption in their own way. It was part of a list of bullet points. I got dinged for their own being ...
7
votes
3answers
2k views

Reflexive love: where does “love me some …” come from?

It seems trendy to use a reflexive-like construction with love or hate plus some, like this: You know I love me some cheese! I hate me some cold and the temperature is dropping. Where did this ...
7
votes
3answers
8k views

“People like you” versus “people like yourself”?

In the latest South Park episode, I noticed a line: We have so many abandoned babies and not enough people like yourself who care. Which kinda struck me, because I'd expect it to be people ...
6
votes
3answers
1k views

“A sensible person like you” vs. “a sensible person like yourself”

What is the difference between you and yourself in the following context? My dear Professor, surely a sensible person like yourself can call him by his name. My dear Professor, surely a ...
5
votes
4answers
2k views

Gender neutral reflexive pronoun — equivalent to “himself” and “herself”

How would you refer to a gender neutral subject with a reflexive pronoun? It is unbelievable how a perpetrator will cast oneself in the role of victim. That does not seem right. Is there a ...
5
votes
4answers
25k views

When to use “me” or “myself”?

Which one is correct: Someone like me... or Someone like myself... Is "like myself" ever correct?
4
votes
2answers
5k views

“I am I”, “I am myself”, or “I am me”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When is it correct to use “yourself” and “myself” (versus “you” and “me”)? According to Google Ngram, "I am myself" is more common that "I am I", but which is correct? ...
4
votes
3answers
186 views

You yourself - double pronoun

You have made it up yourself. This is obviously ok. But if the pronoun it should be repalced by a long noun-phrase: You have made up the illusory world in which you move yourself. It would ...
4
votes
1answer
136 views

“Reflexive only” verbs

English can use a lot of verbs in a reflexive context. Even ones that usually are used intransitively. I laugh myself silly. However, it seems like there are very few – perhaps no – verbs that ...
4
votes
1answer
14k views

'Him or herself' v. 'himself or herself'?

I was reading this article on the New York Times. This sentence caused me some confusion: But what I’m teaching are topics such as 5th-century Indian theories of logical inference, or the ...
4
votes
2answers
191 views

Come to (regain consciousness) and pull to (shut)

I don't know if it's part of my regional dialect, but around these parts we use the phrase "pull to" to mean 'close the door all the way.' It wasn't until last week that it struck me as odd. Pull the ...
3
votes
2answers
266 views

Wrong usage of “myself ”, or just putting emphasis on “me”?

I was writing the following sentence, and I realized it somehow sounds odd: I am constantly trying to remind myself to think carefully before speaking, but those moments I forget to do so end up ...
3
votes
1answer
2k views

Is it correct to say “I myself”?

I thought it was incorrect to say I myself as in: I myself don’t like this idea. However, last night I was watching the second Harry Potter movie, and one of the characters said: In case you ...
3
votes
2answers
230 views

“X is me” or “X is myself”

Which is correct? The English Stack Exchange user with the ID of 5481 is me. The English Stack Exchange user with the ID of 5481 is myself.
3
votes
0answers
278 views

Why himself and themselves, not hisself and theirselves? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why “themselves” and “himself” I = myself   you = yourself  he = himself   she = herself  it = itself   we = ourselves  you = yourselves  they = ...
2
votes
3answers
251 views

“Ann's friends and herself” — is this correct?

Is the sentence: Ann's friends and herself were really nice to us. grammatically correct?
2
votes
1answer
397 views

“Neither Billy nor Suzy look” vs. “neither Billy nor Suzy looks” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Neither is” or “neither are” Say you take a photo of Billy and Suzy, but they both end up looking funny. Would you say Neither Billy nor ...
2
votes
4answers
318 views

“Implicate” vs. “incriminate”

I am exploring possible differences in the meanings of 'implicate/incriminate' from using different direct objects. Assume the context is police interrogation: He implicated/incriminated his ...
1
vote
3answers
698 views

“I myself Naresh” as an introduction

I have heard so many times that before starting presentation people introduce themselves like this: I myself Naresh and the topic I am going to present is.... Myself Naresh and the topic I am ...
1
vote
4answers
248 views

Usage of reflexive pronouns

I have read answers to questions like When is it correct to use "yourself" and "myself" (versus "you" and "me")? but I couldn't find a general rule for using ...
1
vote
3answers
308 views

“I draw myself” vs. “I draw me”

"How can I draw myself using a mirror?" — I came across this question and couldn't help but wonder if it should be "draw me". Draw here is to mean "make a picture". What do you think?
1
vote
1answer
103 views

What is the difference between “self-imposed” and “self-inflicted”?

I'm writing something about Fyodor Dostoyevsky's Notes From Underground about how we sometimes revel in suffering. I want to then add ... much of which is not only self-inflicted, but also ...
1
vote
2answers
84 views

Part of speech for non reflexive “oneself”

The words myself, yourself, himself and the like usually function as reflexive pronouns. However, they are also used in context that do not fulfill the common definitions of reflexive. Neither the ...
1
vote
3answers
231 views

Use of “manifest” as an active verb

Recently I completed an English creative writing exam in which I used the phrase files and papers manifest, as if by some unholy magic at the tray on his desk. My teacher stated that my use of ...
1
vote
2answers
3k views

“Myself” vs. “by myself”

I get confused with the following. Any explanation would be greatly appreciated. I can't do it myself. I can't do it by myself.
0
votes
2answers
422 views

“We”, “I”, “this author”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Style Question: Use of “we” vs. “I” vs. passive voice in a dissertation Use of “I”, “we” and the passive voice in a scientific thesis For my ...
0
votes
2answers
104 views

'a trip for my wife and self'

Can one use 'self' as substitute for 'myself' in 'a trip for my wife and self'? I have noticed that using 'myself' there raises other grammatical issues strictly related with the so_called "Toff's ...
0
votes
2answers
837 views
0
votes
2answers
925 views

has changed and is changed

While I was reading a grammar book I came upon this sentence: '...but it has changed because the pronoun in front of it has changed...'. Why does the author use 'has' rather than 'is'? Note: ...
0
votes
1answer
56 views

Should I use “me” or “myself” here?

I know that many questions on topics similar to this one have been asked before, but I have read many of them and still not able to solve my problem. You could attribute it to my poor command of ...
0
votes
1answer
43 views

Which is correct? [duplicate]

Which is correct? Dear Jay, I was contacted by Sue on behalf of herself, John, and you. or Dear Jay, I was contacted by Sue on behalf of herself, John, and yourself.
-1
votes
1answer
432 views

“I”, “me” and “myself” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “My friends and I” vs. “My friends and me” vs. “Me and my friends” Can “myself” stand for both “me” and “I” in “my mother and I/me”? ...
-1
votes
1answer
145 views

Can we use “from” after “stop”?

I want to know the difference between these two items: She couldn't stop herself laughing. She couldn't stop herself from laughing. I assume that No. 2 is wrong, but it seems right!
-2
votes
3answers
94 views

talking about a schizophrenic!

Theoretically, could this sentence be correct when talking about a person with schizophrenia? "he/she is talking to each other" I suppose 'herself' or 'himself' would be the better word to use ...