Questions about reflexive verbs and pronouns

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0
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2answers
44 views

You or yourself

I need some help how to write it? Keep the child in you! Or "Keep the child in yourself"? I have checked some samples but I am still not sure.
1
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1answer
42 views

Although the rule was made by “him” or “himself” [duplicate]

Although the rule was made by ....., the director rarely enforced it. Should it be "him" or "himself"?
0
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0answers
25 views

What is correct: using myself or I? [duplicate]

What is correct: we are waiting on dinner for myself and Jamie, or, we are waiting on dinner for Jamie and I?
2
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2answers
48 views

I wonder whether it should be a just pronoun or a reflexive one

Turkey’s Justice and Development (AK) party won national elections by a surprisingly large margin, taking 317 of 550 seats in parliament and giving it back the majority it lost in previous elections ...
2
votes
2answers
56 views

You or Yourself?

I need some help with you/yourself because I'm sure I misuse it all the time. Here's an example sentence: What is a nice, smart girl like you/yourself hanging around a group of kids like them for? ...
0
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0answers
28 views

“Closer in age to herself”: Hypercorrection? Grammatical?

Is the use of “myself” in the following sentence and example of hypercorrection, or is this acceptable use according to standard (i.e., prescriptivist) grammar? Her grandmother was crazy about ...
8
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1answer
139 views

Do reflexive verbs often evolve into intransitive usage?

With the relatively recent proliferation in the number and variety of genders that our contemporaries willingly proclaim themselves to be or belong to, a new intransitive sense of the verb identify, ...
0
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1answer
43 views

Reflexive pronoun

What reflexive pronoun should I use when referring to a city, itself or herself? Lisbon is a city that does not show herself/itself.
13
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2answers
1k views

“This includes me” or “This includes myself”? [duplicate]

Which of the following is correct - or are both of these examples grammatical? This includes me, my friend and my brother. This includes myself, my friend and my brother. EDIT NOTE: ...
5
votes
1answer
337 views

Who do we keep an air of mystery about?

This is a followup to my post on meta.SE. The filler text: Apparently, this user prefers to keep an air of mystery about them. sounds odd to my ear. I understand that "them" is being used as a ...
0
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1answer
181 views

“such as yourselves” or “such as you”

Would it be Without patrons such as yourselves, we could not have this event. OR Without patrons such as you, we could not have this event.
0
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2answers
311 views

I looked at the mirror and saw: “me” or “myself”? [closed]

Which one is right to use in the following sentence? I looked at the mirror and saw Me / Myself.
3
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1answer
119 views

Is this just a peculiarity of the specific text, or does the disuse of “‑self” to indicate the reflexive here speak to broader trends?

In the 1917 JPS translation of the Hebrew Bible, we have, in Ecclesiastes 2: I made me great works; I builded me houses; I planted me vineyards; I made me gardens and parks, and I planted trees in ...
0
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1answer
50 views

You vs. Yourself?

If a child points at a necklace his classmate is making, and he wonders if the classmate is making it for herself or for someone else, which of the following is more appropriate? "Is this for ...
2
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0answers
43 views

Formation of Reflexive Pronouns [duplicate]

In English possessive adjectives and reflexive pronouns are I - My - Myself You - Your - Yourself He - His - Himself * She - Her - Herself * It - Its - Itself * They (sing.) - Their - Themself * We ...
0
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2answers
72 views

Avoiding reflexive pronouns

Say, for some reason, it's preferable to avoid pronouns when referring to someone. With most forms of pronouns, it's easy to do so by substituting their name in. Consider: She likes the bread of her ...
1
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1answer
104 views

What is “herself” or “himself” on IMDB, when you click on filmography of an actress or actor

What is "herself" or "himself" on the IMDB website, when you click on filmography of an actress or actor? Stephen Hawking Doctor Who Live: The Next Doctor (TV Movie) Himself (as Professor ...
3
votes
4answers
160 views

Missing reflexive when there's a preposition

English does distinguish between a regular pronoun and a self referential one in all persons. However, it seems like the reflexive form isn't always needed. She told him good bye and shut the door ...
0
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2answers
229 views

“Themselves” or “Themself” in a singular context? [duplicate]

I have the following sentence: In order to read the remainder of this book, the reader is advised to familiarize themselves with the concepts contained within this Chapter. I want to put: In ...
0
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0answers
61 views

including or included?

I'd greatly appreciate if someone could tell me whether both of the following are correct: Ageing concerns all of us, INCLUDING me. [I know this one is correct] Ageing concerns all of us, me ...
0
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2answers
110 views

Uses of Reflexive pronoun [duplicate]

We use reflexive pronoun after some verbs like *avail ourself, acquitted himself, absented themselves * etc and some time we have to avoid from reflexive pronoun after some verbs like break, burst, ...
0
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1answer
283 views

Can a sentence begin with an object or reflexive noun?

I'm writing a function (for a game) which converts a sentence with Spivak pronouns into one with pronouns as specified by a user-selected template. For example, the following input sentence: "E ...
2
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1answer
580 views

“Is himself in?” What does it mean?

Context - A stranger knocks on your door and asks "Is himself in?" himself, a reflexive pronoun, here seems to be used for a nominative pronoun.
0
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0answers
63 views

Why is it “take something with you” and not “take something with yourself”? [duplicate]

Why are reflexive pronouns not used in the following examples? The sentences numbered 1 are what people say, but the sentences numbered 2 are what I understand should be be used, as the subjects of ...
6
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5answers
2k views

Why is “herself” required in this particular sentence?

Why is a reflexive pronoun, i.e. herself, grammatically required in the following sentence? I gave Susie a picture of herself. Compare with: I gave Susie a picture of her. This ...
0
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1answer
917 views

When to use “myself” or “me” [duplicate]

Which is grammatically correct? "Request you to register me for the course" "Request you to register myself for the course"
0
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1answer
157 views

“Myself” as a single subject

How do we use myself as the only subject of a sentence? For example I once heard some people saying Myself am to be blamed. Is this grammatically correct? How is it different from I am to be blamed? ...
0
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0answers
34 views

“Ourselves” versus “Us”—sentence-specific use? [duplicate]

I'm confused about when to use ourselves and when to use us. I looked at this question, but I'm not sure how to generalize that answer to the sentence I am working with. We need to base our ...
2
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1answer
793 views

Use of reflexive pronoun (you or yourself)? [duplicate]

Given the choice in sentences: I appreciate the help from both yourself and Bob. I appreciate the help from both you and Bob. Which is correct? I'm stuck because I can't seem to ...
-2
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1answer
104 views

What does “themself” mean? [closed]

My English teacher explained about themself and themselves. I don't really quite understand though.
0
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1answer
130 views

Another 'me' versus 'myself' usage question

I am quitting a job. I wrote a letter of resignation and have come upon the following sentence: "Moreover, I believe [name of restaurant] will be better suited to have an employee that is different ...
2
votes
3answers
788 views

“Older version of me” vs. “older version of myself”

I wrote: "...," said an older version of me. But a native speaker of English — which I am not — replaced the me with myself. Can someone tell me which one is correct and why?
0
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1answer
233 views

Should I use “me” or “myself” here?

I know that many questions on topics similar to this one have been asked before, but I have read many of them and still not able to solve my problem. You could attribute it to my poor command of ...
5
votes
3answers
7k views

You yourself - double pronoun

You have made it up yourself. This is obviously ok. But if the pronoun it should be repalced by a long noun-phrase: You have made up the illusory world in which you move yourself. It would ...
0
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1answer
87 views

Which is correct? [duplicate]

Which is correct? Dear Jay, I was contacted by Sue on behalf of herself, John, and you. or Dear Jay, I was contacted by Sue on behalf of herself, John, and yourself.
1
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1answer
1k views

What is the difference between “self-imposed” and “self-inflicted”?

I'm writing something about Fyodor Dostoyevsky's Notes From Underground about how we sometimes revel in suffering. I want to then add ... much of which is not only self-inflicted, but also ...
1
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3answers
4k views

“I myself Naresh” as an introduction

I have heard so many times that before starting presentation people introduce themselves like this: I myself Naresh and the topic I am going to present is.... Myself Naresh and the topic I am ...
0
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1answer
233 views

Proper usage of “themselves”?

Could anyone please tell me if I used "themselves" properly in this sentences: Such artificial samples can also potentially reduce distortions ... that are due to varying properties of the samples ...
1
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3answers
3k views

Ourselves vs us?

I am simply haunted by the fear of my family not having enough money to support ourselves. I am simply haunted by the fear of my family not having enough money to support us. The ...
4
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1answer
257 views

“Reflexive only” verbs

English can use a lot of verbs in a reflexive context. Even ones that usually are used intransitively. I laugh myself silly. However, it seems like there are very few – perhaps no – verbs that ...
1
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2answers
1k views

Part of speech for non reflexive “oneself”

The words myself, yourself, himself and the like usually function as reflexive pronouns. However, they are also used in context that do not fulfill the common definitions of reflexive. Neither the ...
0
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2answers
7k views
3
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5answers
798 views

Usage of reflexive pronouns

I have read answers to questions like When is it correct to use "yourself" and "myself" (versus "you" and "me")? but I couldn't find a general rule for using ...
1
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2answers
3k views

Use of “manifest” as an active verb

Recently I completed an English creative writing exam in which I used the phrase files and papers manifest, as if by some unholy magic at the tray on his desk. My teacher stated that my use of ...
6
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3answers
1k views

Come to (regain consciousness) and pull to (shut)

I don't know if it's part of my regional dialect, but around these parts we use the phrase "pull to" to mean 'close the door all the way.' It wasn't until last week that it struck me as odd. Pull the ...
4
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1answer
45k views

Is it correct to say “I myself”?

I thought it was incorrect to say I myself as in: I myself don’t like this idea. However, last night I was watching the second Harry Potter movie, and one of the characters said: In case you ...
2
votes
4answers
1k views

“Implicate” vs. “incriminate”

I am exploring possible differences in the meanings of 'implicate/incriminate' from using different direct objects. Assume the context is police interrogation: He implicated/incriminated his ...
9
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2answers
4k views

How should I avoid this reflexive pronoun, or is it okay?

I typed a sentence in Microsoft Word as: o Each mobile operating system implements encryption in their own way. It was part of a list of bullet points. I got dinged for their own being ...
0
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1answer
185 views

Can we use “from” after “stop”?

I want to know the difference between these two items: She couldn't stop herself laughing. She couldn't stop herself from laughing. I assume that No. 2 is wrong, but it seems right!
1
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3answers
768 views

“I draw myself” vs. “I draw me”

"How can I draw myself using a mirror?" — I came across this question and couldn't help but wonder if it should be "draw me". Draw here is to mean "make a picture". What do you think?