Questions about redundant constructions, pleonasms, etc.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

1
vote
3answers
78 views

Ambiguous pronouns

I have a statement like The performance of the proposed scheme, and its dependence on … Here, ‘it’ can refer to either the performance of the scheme, or the scheme itself. I changed the ...
17
votes
2answers
2k views

Isn't the word “shotgun” a self-redundancy?

I was googling the reason for why it's called "shotgun" to ride beside the driver when it suddenly hit me - why on Earth is the firearm called "shotgun"?! Is there any other kind of a gun than one ...
0
votes
1answer
63 views

*Deja vu* all over again [closed]

"Deja vu all over again" is an example of either a semi-literate (when the speaker does not know what deja vu means) or a jocular use (when the speaker tries to be funny). Can you give similar ...
1
vote
2answers
77 views

Isn't the term “foreign national” redundant? [closed]

Looking at the definition given at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foreign_national (I know, not a great source) I can't see how replacing this with just "foreigner" wouldn't suffice?
0
votes
2answers
69 views

Is it ok to say “mutually practice together”?

Is it correct to say This way we can mutually practice together. Since mutually has already been mentioned, is it correct if I use the word together at the end? It may be redundant, but is ...
3
votes
3answers
155 views

Is “over-saturated” redundant?

For me, "saturated" implies there couldn't exist more of given quantity, like concentration of substance in a solution. So "over-saturated" (as in "over-saturated market") seems redundant.
4
votes
4answers
178 views

What does “cyber-” actually mean?

I'm heading into the postgraduate phase of my Computer Science-oriented studies, and I can't put my finger on what this root means. According to Etymology Online it comes from Cybernetics, which in ...
1
vote
2answers
61 views

Is the term “fresh and original” redundant?

I see this phrase all over the place. Fresh in this usage appears to be in the usage: not previously known or used; new or different. And directly lists original as a synonym. And original in ...
2
votes
1answer
43 views

How does a “research scientist” differ from a “scientist”?

I have seen the term "research scientist" in several job descriptions. Does the qualifier "research" distinguish a special kind of scientific role, or is this actually a redundant phrase. How can you ...
1
vote
1answer
57 views

that had -> having?

I want to make this sentence shorter: Also, items that had poor parameter estimates were removed from the analysis. Is it correct to turn that had into having? Also, items having poor ...
2
votes
2answers
124 views

Additionally … also

[disclosure: I'm not a native speaker of English] I work as a university professor. When writing up lecture notes as well as research papers, I have a tendency to write things like the following. ...
1
vote
2answers
87 views

Is “further strengthen” or “further bolster” redundant?

For example, To further strengthen my graduate school application, I studied Spanish in Argentina for a semester. The wording seems redundant and awkward to me, but it's common and I'd like ...
2
votes
4answers
110 views

Which of the two sentences is correct?

"What I feel more important is for you to go home right now." "What I feel is more important is for you to go home right now." Which sentence is correct? Also, is there a rule that is being followed ...
0
votes
2answers
52 views

Is “must certainly” redundant?

Is "must certainly" redundant or incorrect? Or is it a valid way to stress the certainty of "must"? Examples: You must be wrong. You must certainly be wrong.
0
votes
3answers
90 views

'Hot water heater' versus 'Water heater'

I've heard 'Hot water heater' and 'Water heater' being used interchangeably to refer to an appliance which generates a supply of heated water. The wording of 'Hot water heater' feels redundant, as ...
2
votes
2answers
213 views

Is 'co-conspirator' redundant?

I've noticed in the news that multiple individuals involved in a crime are referred to as co-conspirators. Etymonline gives the origin of conspire: conspire (v.): late 14c., from Old French ...
1
vote
2answers
136 views

Unnecessary pronouns: “The President he issued…”

Is it now considered acceptable to follow a proper noun with a pronoun? E.g. The President he issued a new executive order.
0
votes
1answer
88 views

Can you use “has” instead of “contains”?

If I say: The new ipad has a 4.5" lcd screen and a microUSB slot. instead of: The new ipad contains a 4.5" lcd screen and a microUSB slot. Is it better or worse? Is "contains" necessary, am I ...
1
vote
2answers
55 views

“Information is a distinction that makes a difference” - Donald MacKay

This quote keeps puzzling me. I've newly started attending some lectures relating to the linguistic/information and theories of linguists past and present, which is usually followed up by a debate ...
-2
votes
2answers
156 views

Why is “safe haven” used so frequently, by those who should know better? [closed]

A haven is a place that is safe. So, "safe haven" is redundant. Shockingly, several state legislatures have even passed laws for dropping off babies with no penalty; these laws are usually referred ...
1
vote
2answers
106 views

Is “Math Calculation” redundant when describing how to solve a problem?

I was corrected by another individual when describing the solution to a problem as a "math calculation". Is math implied when using calculation in a sentence therefore making my statement redundant?
0
votes
2answers
105 views

“Should character education be part of the curriculum that perspective teachers are exposed to in their credentialing program?” — is this too wordy? [closed]

Should character education be part of the curriculum that perspective teachers are exposed to in their credentialing program?
2
votes
2answers
101 views

Is it redundant to say “a spelling bee contest”?

A "spelling bee" is an expression usually used to describe the spelling contest, but not necessarily. With that in mind, is it be considered redundant to call it a "spelling bee contest" or a ...
1
vote
2answers
231 views

“What do children aged/ages 5 to 11 years old know about the sun?” — redundant?

I truly believe there is something a tad... non-normative about constructions like "children ages 5 to 11 years old" or "children aged 5 to 11 years old". Isn't that redundant? Shouldn't it read ...
4
votes
2answers
151 views

At least two or more: Not always redundant?

At least two or more Is the “or more” bit above ever not redundant? Seems absolutely redundant to me, but it gets about 170 million Google hits, and many from government sites and university ...
3
votes
2answers
4k views

Do you need the “why” in “That's the reason why”? [duplicate]

I often hear people say things like “That's the reason why I....” As far as I know, “That's the reason I...” would still be grammatically correct, but I can't find anything stating one way or the ...
2
votes
6answers
272 views

Is the “will” in “can and will” necessary?

Anyone who's ever seen much American film or television has heard some variation of the following sentences countless times: You have the right to remain silent. If you choose to give up that ...
38
votes
11answers
6k views

Is the usage of 'personally' in 'I personally don't like something' redundant?

What is the difference between the following? I personally don't like wax museums. I don't like wax museums. The adverb personally does not seem to emphasize anything here. Is it ...
1
vote
1answer
16k views

Is it correct to start a sentence with “with” in English?

Is it correct to use with at the beginning of a sentence? Here's an example sentence: With the development of the economy, living standards improved. To my eyes this looks unnatural; I would ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

Usage of “she herself” or “he himself” [closed]

As I understand it, he and him are etymologically, and for purposes of grammar, different cases of the same word. If it's the same word, wouldn't it be sufficient to use himself alone—with maybe the ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

Is “quintessential example” correct usage?

Since quintessential means "representing the perfect example of a class" is it correct to use "the quintessential example" as in this sentence: "Electrons are the quintessential example of ...
0
votes
1answer
48 views

Is “signup for registration” redundant?

I'm writing a document for an exercise-project spec. The line goes: A simple registration website where visitors can view registered users and signup for registration themselves. Is this being ...
2
votes
2answers
187 views

Is the word multimedia redundant?

So, the correct plural form of medium is media. Of course, there are exceptions, and the words have taken on new usages (such as adding a definitive article "the" to media, making it singular), but ...
-1
votes
3answers
2k views

“Within” and “in” when referring to time

I know that both can mean "inside" but what I don't have clear is whether both mean the same when talking about time. For example: The party is in two days = The party is within two days ?? ...
1
vote
4answers
352 views

Is “appears likely” redundant?

Likeliness is already uncertain, so saying that an even is likely, is surely the same as saying it appears the event will occur, right? Wouldn't this mean that "X appears likely" is the same as saying ...
0
votes
1answer
219 views

“That that” vs. “that” [closed]

Is "that that" or "that, that" redundant in sentences such as this: The reason we are late is that that we had an accident. or The reason we are late is that, that we had an accident. Is ...
2
votes
2answers
171 views

And/or in total negation: “Some people are not able to interpret and/or analyze”

In the following sentence, the “and/or” seems odd in a case of total negation: Evidently some people are not able to interpret and/or analyze at that deeper level. Because the sentence says “are not ...
2
votes
4answers
410 views

Is the phrase “spherical ball” redundant?

In a computer science course, our professor was explaining the idea of object oriented programming using the analogy of soccer. While reading the Wikipedia article on Association Football, it said ...
1
vote
4answers
2k views

Is “a choice between one of two options” grammatically correct?

In: a choice between one of two options I would like to know if this is correct grammatically. I came across it in a scientific paper. I think the “one of ” part should be removed. Am I correct? ...
4
votes
4answers
2k views

Is the phrase “consistently inconsistent” redundant and does it have a single word?

I stumbled on this phrase today, but have seen it in news articles and blogs, as well. Here's an example from this site: To put it mildly, the result of exercise was and remains consistently ...
1
vote
2answers
152 views

Is this headline as redundant as it seems?

Drunk driver found hiding after hit-and-run Is it necessary to write "found hiding"? It seems like the only time you can find something is when it is hidden or missing. Is this statement ...
3
votes
3answers
215 views

Is saying “an obsolete remnant” redundant?

Is saying "an obsolete remnant" or "an old remnant" redundant (or tautologous), or can the adjective be necessary to convey what I'm trying to say? (I imagined "remnant" already carries the ...
0
votes
2answers
254 views

Is using of “each” along with “apiece” redundant in this sentence?

I was interested in the following sentence which appeared in an article titled “Kooky Politics Make for Entertaining Races" by Albert R. Hunt in The New York Times (June 20, 2010). The figure ...
18
votes
4answers
2k views

Why do street parking signs say “no stopping or standing”?

I see redundancy here. If one stands a car on the street, isn't it necessary to stop first? It would seem the most logical and efficient use of language for the sign would be "no stopping." Or do ...
0
votes
4answers
591 views

Is “relatively big compared to” redundant?

If I say something like He is big compared to the other guy. He is relatively big compared to the other guy. is the adverb relatively wrong because of redundancy?
3
votes
5answers
328 views

Is it IQ or IQ score?

What's the correct way to use the term intelligence quotient in a sentence? Jim's IQ is 130. –or– Jim's IQ score is 130.
4
votes
2answers
1k views

When did “crew” become a sport? When did “crew team” come into use?

When I was a child, there was a sport called rowing; if four or more people rowed together in the same boat, they would be known as a crew. At some point, either before or during my childhood, the ...
0
votes
3answers
13k views

Is the phrase “a stark contrast” redundant?

Merriam-Webster defines stark as "sharply delineated." The same dictionary defines a contrast as a "juxtaposition of dissimilar elements." Doesn't it follow then that "a stark contrast" essentially ...
5
votes
3answers
667 views

Is it redundant to use “or not” at the end of a sentence weighing two options? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Whether or not” vs. “whether” For example: "I was unsure whether to pity him." "I was unsure whether to pity him or not."
1
vote
3answers
611 views

Usage - lone lonely loner

Is it proper to call someone a lone lonely loner? I take lone to mean the only, lonely to mean feeling sad and loner to mean someone who prefers being alone. So, the usage kind of makes sense to ...