This tag is for questions related to the formation, or answering of questions.

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3answers
31 views

What we call the next consecutive question in series of problem

on stack overflow we can edit the questions and this problem is based on that. Scenario I was asking problem A and got the solution of A but face a new problem B. How do I mention (reference ...
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0answers
32 views

Can you play ON it?

I have a question. Is it correct to ask "Can you play ON it?"? The word "it " means an instrument. So if I ask "can you play it? ", will this question mean the same as "Can you play the guitar?"?
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7answers
7k views

Can I say “Do you have a facebook”?

Can I say "Do you have a facebook" to ask if someone has "a Facebook account"? I know it is not grammatically correct. I just wanted to know if people say that or not.
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3answers
166 views

How to categorize this phrase. Relative clause, Interrogative clause, Adverbial clause?

What is "Where to go" in the sentence "Where to go is the question." Is it a adverbial phrase or a relative clause? And what is "Why go" in the sentence "Why go when you can stay?" - is it a clause?
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2answers
46 views

did you know …? [duplicate]

Should I use an interrogation mark in the following examples? Did you know that…? ...in Finland, there is only 1 mandatory test, PISA, taken when children are 16 ? ...in Brazil an ...
2
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1answer
45 views

Rhetorical device - listing rejected answers

Is there a name for the rhetorical device whereby you ask a question and then list the rejected answers? For example: "What was it then? It wasn't x, nor y, nor z. No, in fact it was . . .." The ...
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2answers
49 views

Word order in question with very long subject

The normal word order for a wh- question in English is: wh- + auxiliary + subject + verb. Hence the sentence below should be correct: What might the consequences of the loss of diversity of plant ...
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3answers
3k views

How to Identify a Rhetorical Question?

I am familiar with the idea of a rhetorical question, but are there any criteria to mark or identify one? Can a rhetorical question be recognized alone or does it need surrounding context? It ...
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0answers
17 views

'do' or 'does': “do/does money and power control the world?” [duplicate]

Can you please help me with the correct form of this question?
2
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1answer
41 views

“How much X is in Y?” vs “How much X is there in Y?”

First: How much money is there in a bank? Second: How much money is in a bank? Honestly, both of them are the same for me, but who knows.. I am not a native speaker.
2
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6answers
235 views

What is the question for “twice as many … as” format?

I have a question about how to make a certain type of question. There is the statement here: The airplane has twice as many engines as it requires. I want to make a question the answer to ...
0
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0answers
27 views

University essay question [migrated]

I am applying for a university scholarship program, and as part of the application I have to write some essays but I don't understand what they want exactly in the first essay. The question is written ...
1
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1answer
43 views

Punctuation for referring to a question

Are either of these incorrect or nonstandard ways to refer to a question mid sentence? Or are both of them okay? Our experiment set out to answer the question; is running fruit under water an ...
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4answers
217 views

Reported speech - questions

In the Cambridge Grammar of the English Language; Huddleston and Pullum 2002, they make the following qualifying comment: ... reported speech covers the reporting of spoken and written text but ...
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2answers
38 views

“I'm sure this would not have happen” vs. “I'm not sure this didn't happen”

I was asked what's wrong with this sentence: I'm not sure this didn't happen. I didn't think it was incorrect, but my friend said I was. So, is the sentence correct either way, or is one correct and ...
0
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2answers
57 views

“Is it for when?” vs. “When is it for?”

I always get confused which of the following is correct: Is it for when? When is it for? Or are there further ways to ask for when something is needed. The it in question is an ...
0
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1answer
21 views

does a semicolon or comma belong before “is this correct?”

You went to the store and bought chips, is that correct? You went to the store and bought chips; is that correct? You bought a bag of chips, correct? You bought a bag of chips; correct? Thanks for ...
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5answers
31k views

How to ask if a person has done/had breakfast?

Is it "Did you do breakfast?" or "Did you have/had breakfast?"
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7answers
509 views

Is there a word for this situation?

Some co-workers of mine from another office play a "question game." I wasn't there for the question, but here it is: Is it accidentally impregnating someone if you know you're trying to get her ...
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2answers
104 views

Is it correct to ask “ What degrees is it outside?” [closed]

My friend keeps saying that asking "What degrees is it outside?" is not correct, is she right?
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1answer
45 views

What does “So you are going to be famous ?!” express? [closed]

My teacher gave us a dialogue the other day and the boy said he was playing in a band so his friend said : Oh, that must be exciting! So you are going to be famous ? Then she gave us a question : What ...
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0answers
25 views

“Which foods do you…” vs. “What foods do you…” [duplicate]

The word "which", by its definition, is "asking for information specifying one or more people or things from a definite set." So, naturally, "which foods do you..." is the correct way of phrasing this ...
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votes
5answers
174 views

Why is the word “how” considered an adverb, even if the answer is an adjective?

Consider this question and its related answer: Question: How was the pizza? Answer: It was delicious. The question is asking how, which is defined in every dictionary as an ...
2
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1answer
49 views

“What X is this?” vs. “What's this X?”

What's the difference between "What color is this?" and "What's this color?". If someone is asking a kid, which one is more appropriate? Should he use "Which" instead of "What"?
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1answer
58 views

How to phrase a question to know a person's current number in a particular position?

I'm trying to figure out how to phrase a question to know a person's current number in a position. For example: Mr. X is the 15th prime minister of India. What is the correct question to ask ...
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3answers
85 views

If X was not part Y, I'd like it - meaning

I'm trying to fill out a survey that asks me about features that should or should not be included in a smartphone app. The actual questions are confidential, but it's in the style of a sentence like ...
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2answers
87 views

“Why does he not?” or “Why does not he?” and why? [duplicate]

Which is the more correct form: Why does he not? Why does not he? and why? At first blush 1 would seem to be grammatical - just on an intuitive judgement. However 2 logically seems as ...
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4answers
5k views

Why is it “how come” and not “why come”?

When someone asks "How come?", the person answering actually answers the question "why?". "Why?" and "How?" are very different questions. I was wondering how "how come?" came to be an alternative way ...
4
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2answers
79 views

How do I punctuate a question with a guessed answer in it?

How to punctuate a question directly followed by the asker's guess at the answer? E.g. What's in here? Your books? What's in here, your books? What's in here; your books? Which of ...
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2answers
31 views

Another way to say “ Having recieved no response” [closed]

Please suggest other ways to phrase" Having received no response."
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1answer
66 views

Correct question form with “supposed to”? [closed]

I am wondering is following question correct: Is it what was supposed to be done here? Thanks in advance.
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4answers
791 views

Why do some questions not start with an auxiliary verb?

When I learned English, my teachers told me that all questions must have an auxiliary verb at the beginning, just like Are you mad? or Is she playing? do. But when watching some movies or talking ...
48
votes
11answers
133k views

Do you really answer “How do you do?” with “How do you do?”

We're told in our English classes (learning English as a foreign language) that the only possible answer to How do you do? is to repeat the question: How do you do? (While it's ...
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8answers
20k views

Should “guess what” be a question or command?

In other words: should it be “Guess what?” or “Guess what!”? Or does the correct usage depend on the context and intent of the speaker?
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1answer
67 views

Do these questions have the same meaning? [closed]

Didn't you come here last week? and Did you come here last week, didn't you?
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5answers
311 views

Negative in a question with various negative valence words

so I was walking to a very nice place in Berlin today only to find it empty yet again. I was asking myself why this is... and now I am confused. Which of the following forms of asking are correct? ...
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0answers
45 views

Way to ask interviewer (/speaking examiner) to repeat slowly its question [duplicate]

The accent of a speaking examiner is sometimes difficult to understand completely. Asking him to repeat his question is a delicate action that should be handled correctly, in my consideration. ...
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votes
4answers
10k views

“Haven't you?” or “don't you?”

What is the right question tag (in British English) when we use the verb have? I have interviewed a few native speakers and none of them could explain why sometimes they prefer "haven't/hasn't" and ...
1
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2answers
69 views

Cooperation, how to use it in a question?

Is it correct to say: Would you like to start a cooperation (with us)? Or should it be: Would you like to cooperate (with us)? I feel like the first sentence is wrong, as it sounds to much like ...
2
votes
2answers
5k views

“For how long have you been…” vs. “how long have you been…”

Ante-scriptum: The question should be quite a frequently arising one, so this might be a duplicate. If it is, I haven't found it previously asked here I don't know if the title is meaningful, but ...
0
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1answer
234 views

“Are you hurt” vs. “Did you get hurt”

What should we use when someone is injured? Are you hurt? Or it should be Did you get hurt? I felt using the second one as improper. Please correct me.
0
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2answers
103 views

Is there difference in common usage between 'I have an answer' and 'I know an answer' sentences

In common everyday usage is there any diffrence between these sentences: 'I have an answer' and 'I know an answer' My clue: Ad 1. I have some proposition of an answer but I'm not 100% sure Ad 2. ...
0
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1answer
74 views

What is the origin of “Why don't you…” as a suggestion or command?

Frequently, in spoken dialogue one hears the above phrase used as a suggestion to the listener (or sometimes more strongly, as a command): Why don't you give me that book? Why don't you go to the ...
0
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0answers
19 views

Is there a word for 'religism'? [duplicate]

I'm searching for a word with a meaning similar to Racism or Sexism but within the context of religion. Is there a word for this meaning?
3
votes
4answers
130 views

Can I say “Which area of triangle a or triangle b is larger”?

I am a math teacher in Asia. In one math question there are two triangles, A and B. I want to ask which has the larger area. Should I ask: "Which area of triangle a or triangle b is larger"? or ...
4
votes
4answers
240 views

Use of 'not' in questions

When is it okay to use 'not' when posing a question? I believe that the person asking would include the 'not 'when he believes the implied to be true. For example: "Are you going to the store? "Are ...
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18answers
5k views

How should I phrase a question that must be answered with an ordinal number (e.g., the third prime)?

I want to make a question having an answer as follows: 5 is the third prime number. The bold part is the answer. How to phrase the question?
0
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5answers
4k views

What does “What are you into?” mean?

I personally don't use this question in spoken language but I usually see it in written language. I also frequently see that when someone asks this question, it elicits in turn the question "What do ...
0
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1answer
49 views

Are these default questions about events correct grammatically? [closed]

As you can see below, I created some default questions which are supposed to ask about events that either have happened or will happen in future(the gaps will be filled by different events such as ...
0
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1answer
93 views

Inversion in Wh-questions [duplicate]

What is difference between: Why I am studying? Why am I studying?