This tag is for questions related to the formation, or answering of questions.

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1
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2answers
157 views

Another way to say “ Having received no response” [closed]

Please suggest other ways to phrase" Having received no response."
21
votes
15answers
4k views

Framing a question whose answer is an ordinal number

I am the third daughter (or son) of my parents. OR I am the third child of my parents How should a question that is answered with the above sentences be framed?
1
vote
3answers
162 views

‘Your dream’ vs. ‘your dream in life’

I have been asked to answer the following two, separate, questions: What is your dream? What is your dream in life? I am confused by this, because they look almost identical to me, and I cannot ...
0
votes
1answer
37 views

Is the question form of a statement truly implicit?

We have statements, and we have questions. A request made in the form of a statement has a question equivalent. But is that question equivalent implicit, or is it simply a rewording of the statement ...
0
votes
1answer
33 views

Use of a gerund in a prepositional phrase? [closed]

I would like to ask something about the use of the gerund. I have these two sentences, and I would like to know if there's only one good answer, or if they both are correct. I would also like to know ...
-2
votes
2answers
37 views

Who did/do I met today on the way to work? [closed]

Lets say you have the sentence Today I've met an old coleague on the way to work. What is the question going to be: Who did/do I met today on the way to work? did or do, and why? EDIT: ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

Wh-questions: auxiliary verbs or not?

What's the difference between these two questions: Why they chose football? and Why did they choose football?
2
votes
2answers
56 views

Word order for subordinate questions

I know subordinate questions have no inversion. Should this sentence: "Do you know what are the good things to do around here?" be "Do you know what the good things are to do around ...
0
votes
2answers
53 views

Which of these statements is correct? [closed]

A friend and I were discussing a past event and she said: "I don't know when you left yesterday" but I thought she ought to say: "I don't know when you leave yesterday" Please tell me ...
-2
votes
0answers
35 views

Have you come on yesterday [closed]

Which one is the right sentence of the following questions. Have you come on yesterday ? Are you came on Yesterday ?
2
votes
1answer
98 views

What job don't students like very much?

I need to have my English students read a pie chart containing information about jobs. One of the questions I wrote is: "What job don't students like very much?" (They are expected to read the ...
0
votes
1answer
43 views

Question using this structure “Since … is …, could we …?”

I want to give a fact and then make a question. like this: Since this info is important for investigation, could we store it for later use? Is that correct?
9
votes
4answers
291 views

How to categorize this phrase. Relative clause, Interrogative clause, Adverbial clause?

What is "Where to go" in the sentence "Where to go is the question." Is it a adverbial phrase or a relative clause? And what is "Why go" in the sentence "Why go when you can stay?" - is it a clause?
38
votes
18answers
6k views

How should I phrase a question that must be answered with an ordinal number (e.g., the third prime)?

I want to make a question having an answer as follows: 5 is the third prime number. The bold part is the answer. How to phrase the question?
2
votes
1answer
101 views

Is asking a question in the form 'What that impression might be?' acceptable?

Someone wrote to me - Because you have an impression of me that's not true maybe. I responded What that impression might be? Is that acceptable or not?
3
votes
2answers
104 views

Ask someone about their birth order [duplicate]

If I need to ask someone about their birth order, what question is usually used? Let's say I do not ask how many children his family has first. What is your birth order? or Which child are you in ...
2
votes
1answer
68 views

Replacing “do you have” with “have you”

Found a similar question here, but with some minor differences. Is it archaic to use have you in sentences such as this: John : I think we can see it with a specially crafted telescope. Mary : ...
6
votes
3answers
841 views

Why is there no form of “do” in questions of the type “who knows?”

I'm wondering whether expressions like the ones below are correct or not. I've seen them several times but they don't seem to follow the typical grammatical structure. Who comes? (instead of ...
0
votes
5answers
89 views

What is a word to describe a response to a question that is evasive but not untrue [duplicate]

I'm looking for a single word synonym of evasion, fudging or dodging the question that does not imply deceit in the answer (apart from possible awareness of the respondent that they are not actually ...
3
votes
1answer
68 views

On Interrogative Sentence [duplicate]

Is it correct to make a sentence interrogative only with question mark (and tone) and without following essential grammatical rules? For example, people usually say You are going to the stadium? ...
2
votes
1answer
49 views

Can I have multiple question marks in one sentence? [duplicate]

When I ask multiple questions at once should I break it up into multiple sentences and capitalize the first letter at the beginning of each question(?), or should I use one question mark at the very ...
0
votes
1answer
38 views

Use of “If you really want to”

If somebody says, "If you really want to leave me, then let me know," which reply would be correct in the English language—"Yes I do" or "Yes I really do"?
1
vote
0answers
51 views

On correct using of colon [closed]

Is the use of a colon in this question grammatically correct? Which colors do you prefer: blue or green?
0
votes
1answer
118 views

“Don't you…” question

I'm studying English for 10 months. I suppose myself to know it quite well now. But I'm confused about one thing. I noticed that some of my English speaking friends sometimes ask "Don't you ...
0
votes
1answer
61 views

Using the phrase 'a number of' with countable/uncountable nouns and verbs in singular/plural [closed]

Find the mistake: Every year, an enormous number of paper is used to produce books. My thoughts so far: After googling I found that when using "a number of" we use plural verb (i.e., are). Is ...
0
votes
1answer
52 views

The/a/an usage question [duplicate]

In the book I am studying in , I saw these two sentences: After a university education, she got married. These days, women have as good an education as men, which I think is a good thing ...
0
votes
0answers
46 views

Do you use a question mark or period in this sentence?

"What happened, if you don't mind me asking." If you split it in to two different sentences: "What happened?" and "If you don't mind me asking." you can tell where the question mark and period goes. ...
0
votes
1answer
54 views

“How much” questions without auxiliary verb

Are all these questions and their answers possible? a) How much costs this book? -> Ten dollars costs this book. (Ten dollars as a singular subject, the price). b) How much costs this book? -> Ten ...
0
votes
4answers
118 views

Is there a term for a question that is only a question because of a question mark? [duplicate]

I sent a friend a question in the form: Just trying to remember how we know each other? That is a "statement" without the question mark at the end. Is there a term for this? Since it does not ...
0
votes
1answer
28 views

“How do you…?” --> “You have to…?” / “I have to…?”

I need help. Is it correct to answer How do you...? type of questions with You have to...? For example, Person A: How do you wash your clothes? Person B: First, you have to separate colored ...
3
votes
2answers
47 views

Responding to a question correctly with yes or no [duplicate]

This question has been irking me for a while and I cannot seem to find any answer. Take something simple such as: Question:"Did you not enjoy eating at the restaurant?" Response: "No." ...
3
votes
3answers
67 views

How to answer this “as … as” comparison?

With the question, "Is [noun1] as [adjective] as [noun2]?", should one answer in the negative or affirmative when [noun1] is more [adjective] than [noun2]? Example: Animal Top speed ======= ...
1
vote
1answer
34 views

How do I respond to this? [closed]

I asked someone how their day is going. They responded "Hello and it's going lol" how do i respond to that? or was that a way of saying dont bother me?
3
votes
1answer
64 views
1
vote
1answer
253 views

A polite form to change the time of an appointment

I want to ask what the best form for changing a meeting time is. What is the formal way for suggesting another time? Is my sentence ok? Also, is obligatory the right way to describe a class which I ...
1
vote
1answer
98 views

Punctuation for referring to a question

Is either of these an incorrect or nonstandard way to refer to a question mid sentence? Or are both of them okay? Our experiment set out to answer the question; is running fruit under water an ...
0
votes
1answer
89 views

Is the question “If you didn't break the vase, who did?” a conditional sentence?

My problem is that I was taught (I think wrongly) that whenever a conditional sentence refers to past, there should be past perfect tense in the if clause, as in example 1. Example 1: If you ...
1
vote
1answer
59 views

To make it clear + question (or to be sure, to make sure)

"To make it clear", "To be sure", "To make sure" + Question I'm wondering if I can use some of them like this?: To make clear, what is the most important requirement for the project? To be sure, ...
3
votes
2answers
79 views

Position of interrogative auxiliary verbs as replies to statements [closed]

Imagine someone states the following to you: I think you're mistaken. We've never traveled to Italy together. What's the difference between the following two responses, if any? Haven't we? ...
1
vote
0answers
45 views

Should this sentence have a question mark? [closed]

Should the following sentence have a question mark?" Can you ask your dad to come as quickly as possible, she needs a doctor to check her leg.
1
vote
1answer
39 views

How should I phrase this question correctly? [closed]

I am having trouble phrasing this question. Are both these versions grammatically correct? Which one is the best? Any suggestions would be very helpful. Thank you. What are mandatory, recommended ...
2
votes
3answers
13k views

“will” vs “would” in this sentence

I am talking about events taking place in the known future: Would it be okay if I'll confirm around 3 pm? or should it be Would it be okay if I'd confirm around 3 pm? What is the ...
0
votes
1answer
238 views

Question building in English vs. in French [duplicate]

Question about language grammar etymology. In French the question «Do you love?» can be written as «Aimez-vous?» in German — «Mögen Sie?», but in English — «Do you love?». Why should we use the verb ...
24
votes
17answers
3k views

A question asked in order to expose ignorance

I am looking for a particular word that describes: a question that is asked in order to expose ignorance/lack of knowledge. As with a rhetorical question, the questioner knows the answer, but ...
2
votes
1answer
79 views

The use of 'there' in questions

I'm an English teacher in Belgium and would like to know the following... I gave my students the sentence 'There were a lot of people in the shop.' I asked my students to make a good question to get ...
2
votes
2answers
164 views

Can words like “what” be the subject of a sentence?

In a question like "Who hears a noise?", is the subject of the sentence who? I can think of a few tests for subjects like: "the subject is the phrase that inverts with the auxiliary to form a ...
0
votes
0answers
26 views

For what period of time [duplicate]

There is a mathematical model. Model can give a forecast for some duration (hours, days, years). But the forecast will not be equally accurate for different periods of time. How should I ask for what ...
0
votes
1answer
50 views

“Which course are you enrolled in?” vs. “Under which course are you enrolled?”

If I want to ask someone about the course they are taking, what would be the more appropriate usage: Which course are you enrolled in? Under which course are you enrolled?
0
votes
2answers
47 views

How easy it is or How easy is it [duplicate]

The actual sentence goes like this: How easy it is to integrate the two applications? or How easy is it to integrate the two applications? To my understanding 'How easy it is' wrong if used as a ...
0
votes
5answers
12k views

What does “What are you into?” mean?

I personally don't use this question in spoken language but I usually see it in written language. I also frequently see that when someone asks this question, it elicits in turn the question "What do ...