This tag is for questions related to the formation, or answering of questions.

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21 views

If we need to change word order in embedded (indirect) questions, why don't these change word order?

If we need to use different word order in direct and indirect questions (example: Are they planning to marry? / Do you know if they are planning to get married?), why do these embedded questions use ...
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1answer
32 views

How to respond to negative questions (adjectives)?

My friend got me this question: When somebody asks, "Is it not available?" Should I say: (1) "Yes, it is not available." OR (2) "No, it is not available."? I know it would be better to use the word ...
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2answers
19 views

Putting examples in a different sentence

If I were to ask a question like this: What type of glue is it? And I need to provide some examples: Liquid, stick, etc. Do I have to keep them in one sentence or could I split them into ...
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4answers
2k views

Why do some questions not start with an auxiliary verb?

When I learned English, my teachers told me that all questions must have an auxiliary verb at the beginning, just like Are you mad? or Is she playing? do. But when watching some movies or talking ...
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2answers
32 views

“How long is the tomorrow meeting” or “How long is the meeting tomorrow”? [closed]

Which of the following is, or are, correct to say? How long is the tomorrow meeting expected to last? How long is the meeting tomorrow expected to last?
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1answer
69 views

Asking subject - object questions. 'Did' or past form of the verb in Past Simple?

The question is about the rule of asking questions in Past Simple tense. Please, look at the questions below and tell me if my thinking and naming of questions stated here are correct? For example ...
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0answers
30 views

I have a question for this sentence.

Look at this sentence pz. The medical writer, Thomas McKeown, showed that most of the fatal diseases of the 19th century ________________ before the arrive of antibiotics or immunization programmes. ...
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2answers
44 views

Two questions in one sentence (embedded question) [duplicate]

In a question like this (I took it from an English course): Can you tell me if there's anything you don't have any doubts about? Is this correct? (grammatically speaking) Because for me it ...
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1answer
40 views

Should questions phrased as declarations end with a question mark?

Should a question masquerading as a declaration—like, "I wonder if you have any suggestions?"—end with a question mark or a period?
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0answers
23 views

What is the word for accepting help from someone else, not by merit, but because they know you? [duplicate]

So, say that someone is about to start at a new school, and your sister says "Oh, I aced that class! Let me introduce you to the teacher; maybe he'll give you less homework/give you more ...
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1answer
47 views

Using (be) as a main verb in this form (be) without using auxiliary verbs, is it possible?

There's no doubt that "Be happy." and "Don't be sad." are correct. But "They be happy" is incorrect. "They are happy" "Are they happy?" "They aren't happy" "Aren't they happy?" "Why aren't they ...
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0answers
35 views

what is the difference between how many years and how long years [migrated]

for example 1- how many years you lived in this house ? or 2- how long years you lived in this house ? which one is right ?
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1answer
86 views

Is 'Maybe I can help?' correct?

Two weeks ago I did an English test. I was asked the following question: (or something like this, I don't remember the exact question) A classmate is trying to do his homework, but he doesn't know ...
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4answers
91 views

“What's a nice place to go shopping?” or “Where's a nice place to go shopping?”

Which is correct: "What's a nice place to go shopping?" or "Where's a nice place to go shopping?" Why do we use "What's?" and not "Where's?"
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2answers
2k views

“In the case of” or “In case of”

I am wondering whether "in the case of" is a correct expression. I know "in case of" can be used, for example "In case of an emergency" but when would be appropriate to use "in the case of" as long as ...
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2answers
213 views

Is it incorrect to ask a question within a question?

Op's original question: What would be correct and why? a. "Do you know? Where can we get puff pastries from?" b. "Do you know? Where we can get puff pastries from?" Op's revised question (after ...
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0answers
35 views

Survey Design: Past Tense vs. Present Tense

This seems silly, but I can't make up my mind. When asking survey participants to rate their attitude(s) about a past experience, should the statement be in past or present tense? For example, ...
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1answer
56 views

Polite way when you ask someone you don't know a question [closed]

Which is the best way to ask a question in a polite way; for example, I want to write an email to someone that doesn't know me, and to ask something... Is okay to say write this: Sorry to disturb ...
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2answers
30 views

Ask questions in first or second person? [closed]

When I ask a question, should I use first or second person? As an example, should I say "How do you do that?" or "How do I do that?".
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1answer
53 views

Is it all right to end this sentence with a question mark? [closed]

I am writing a story, and one sentence has been bugging me. What was going on with that, I wondered? It's an interior thought, and so I don't use quotations. If it were dialogue, I would put ...
2
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1answer
65 views

Comma after “here”

I've been speculating whether or not I can use a comma after "here"? Unfortunately I haven't been able to find any clarifying answers anywhere, or perhaps I haven't been searching enough. To the ...
0
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2answers
154 views

Proper response to “Let's meet…” [closed]

What's the proper response to this Linda: "Let's meet outside the library." Lucy: "____" A. Is 6.30 all right? B. Yes, let's do it C. How about meeting again? D. I'd like to go to the ...
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5answers
533 views

What is the word for a 'hint' that might help give the solution at the end of movies

For example, in The DaVinci Code (movie), there's an upside-down pyramid shown at the beginning of the movie. When the movie comes to an end, the whole story kind of "gathers" around this pyramid. I ...
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2answers
23 views

Have/having choice simple question [closed]

Which sentence is correct (or maybe both of them wrong or right)? What's difference between them? "What problem do you have with this?"; "What problem are you having with this?"
2
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1answer
59 views

Is “Do you want to try?” incorrect?

I was watching a video about the most frequent mistakes Brazilians make speaking English and the first mistake was saying "Do you want to try?" instead of "Do you want to try it?". I'm a native ...
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2answers
61 views

“I would like” or “I will like”?

If I was to be asked a question like: "What will the witches look like?", how will I respond to it would I say The witches would look like... or The witches will look like.... The example shows ...
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0answers
40 views

what does the expression “There is the slight hint of desperation off you. Of need. ” mean?

I need your help. It is a dialogue When two man have illegal transaction. After one man look another man in the eyes and then say like this. "There is the slight hint of desperation off you. Of ...
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4answers
54k views

I was wondering if there are synonyms for “I was wondering”

Often I ask a question (by e-mail), and precede the question with I was wondering if... For example I was wondering if you can give me your office hrs? Why not just simply ask the real question? ...
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0answers
37 views

A person who make you live adversity [closed]

How do you call a person who always thinks you're wrong whatever you say or ask them (at the job)?
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1answer
47 views

What is the recipient of a question called? [duplicate]

When I ask you a question I am the inquisitor or or the inquirer. But what are you, the one to whom I'm asking the question? Here's the example I'm working with: the children's book "Are you My ...
1
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1answer
25 views

A word to describe type of question (questioning the future)

I know what a rhetorical question is. But this is more like me asking a question which will definitely draw an assumption or a guess as an answer. For example : What do you think the oil prices would ...
0
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1answer
99 views

How to ask properly: “how grave a mistake is”? [closed]

I Googled the following sentence: “how serious is the mistake” and it produced only 5 hits! Does it mean the sentence is ungrammatical? I then tried Googling “how serious is the error” and only got ...
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3answers
93 views

“How did it use/d to work?”; 'use' or 'used'?

In the above sentence I'm having trouble deciding between use & used. If I go to verbalise it the d is definitely dropped, but that could just be a locale thing and written it would still contain ...
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3answers
830 views

Can an “or” question be answered “yes” or “no”?

I recently moved to the West Coast for a new job. I periodically ask if someone is going to take choice A or choice B. Commonly they answer "yes" or "no." I always asked them to re-state by writing ...
3
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1answer
266 views

“Do you also?” as a question?

I was able to find numerous examples of "Do you also..." type questions in The Bible, like: And Yeshua said to the twelve, “Do you also wish to leave?” But I am wondering whether simply "Do you ...
4
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3answers
109 views

What English term is used to describe “sarcasm toward questions about trivial issues”?

The question is difficult to mention in a single line as a title, hence feel free to edit the title. Person-1: Did Brazil win the football match today? Person-2: People are dying across the ...
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1answer
50 views

Is there a name for the words at the beginning of a sentence which make it a question?

Given the following sentences Is it Thursday Today? Does your dog smell? Has your Mother called? Is there a particular name given to the emphasised words at the beginning of the ...
0
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1answer
265 views

How to punctuate a question within a thought [duplicate]

In a third-person narrative, I want to punctuate the following sentence: Wasn't art supposed to impact the reader in an emotional way, she wondered. How would that line be punctuated? I know I ...
0
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1answer
76 views

Use of “If you really want to”

If somebody says, "If you really want to leave me, then let me know," which reply would be correct in the English language—"Yes I do" or "Yes I really do"?
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2answers
233 views

“Can I have a question?”

Is this phrase used at all by native speakers? After almost 20 years of studying and speaking English, I've been told this is a phrase that almost every Czech speaker gets wrong - it seems that even ...
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2answers
136 views

What (or who) is the rival gang of the Jets? [closed]

Is a gang (or a musical group) considered like a person or an object? I.e. should I ask: Who is the rival gang of the Jets? Or should it be: What is the rival gang of the Jets? What is ...
3
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3answers
194 views

What is the word for letters that do not ascend above the midline / uniform height? (i.e. aceuomnwxz, not btlj)

I found the word for the part of letters that rise above the midline (ascender: The part of a lowercase letter that rises above the main body of the letter (as in b, d, h). The part that extends above ...
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1answer
204 views
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5answers
2k views

Is “ Whom did you give the book? ” ungrammatical?

You gave him the book. (1) Based on the sentence (1), it seems to me that the following form of question is possible: Whom did you give the book? (2) instead of To whom ...
0
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1answer
50 views

Questions without a question mark (New Yorker) [duplicate]

How to listen to music How a City in France got out the World's first Short-Story vending machines How we learn fairness What makes great detective fiction according to T.S. Elliot What went wrong at ...
2
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1answer
93 views

Asking questions without “do” in them

In school, we learned that in interrogative statements to use do (e.g. Do you want to go there?). I'm wondering if there are any cases when do is not required. For example, I'm thinking if this is ...
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0answers
23 views

Hiding the aux. verb and subject at the beginning of a question [duplicate]

I was watching 10 Things I Hate About You today, and at some point the protagonist's father starts up the following dialogue: Hello Katerine. Make anyone cry today? Sadly, no. But it's only 4:30. ...
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1answer
4k views

Why is there no auxiliary in the question “How many people study there”?

Why don't we use the auxiliary do in the following question: How many people study there?
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0answers
34 views

How do I ask two questions back to back? [duplicate]

Example: What is that? A bird or an eagle? Is this the correct way to punctuate this sort of question?
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3answers
21k views

“For how long have you been…” vs. “how long have you been…”

Ante-scriptum: The question should be quite a frequently arising one, so this might be a duplicate. If it is, I haven't found it previously asked here I don't know if the title is meaningful, but ...