This tag is for questions related to the formation, or answering of questions.

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0
votes
1answer
845 views

What's the English version of the German “oder?” [closed]

In German, you often add the question word oder after a statement (", oder?") to ask whether the statement's correct. What is the equivalent of oder in English? I always begin sentences with this ...
2
votes
2answers
222 views

Past Perfect question forms with 'before' etc

A part of an entry about Past Perfect (424.1) in Swan's Practical English Usage 3rd Ed states that the past perfect is not necessary in the cases where we use conjunctions (e.g. after, as soon as) and ...
-1
votes
1answer
459 views

Is the answer to this question “neither” or “either”?

She doesn't think so or you don't think so? Is it grammatically correct to respond with Either. or Neither. to this question? Or does this depend on the meaning intended to be ...
-2
votes
3answers
439 views

“What keeps him going?” vs. “What does him keep going?” [duplicate]

Why is the grammatical structure of "What keeps him going?" right? I got a bit confused over this, when I realized that this structure fundamentally contradicts the basic rule I teach my students: ...
-1
votes
1answer
240 views

Colon usage after an imperative sentence in survey instructions

Consider a survey question that asks a question and then gives instruction about how to respond. For example, Is this a sample survey question? Check all that apply: __ yes __ no Is it ...
1
vote
1answer
130 views

“Why not” and double negatives

This popped up during a conversation. My friend said (roughly): Some vegetarians don't eat meat. Why not fish? To me, this felt somewhat weird. Her intent was to ask, if some vegetarians refuse ...
2
votes
2answers
152 views

“Can I do X” vs. “Can't I do X”

Consider this scenarios: A: Can I do X? A: Can't I do X? In both the cases, the B replies with "Yes" to indicate A can do X and with "No" to indicate he cannot. The 1st one seems to ask for ...
-5
votes
1answer
167 views

Grammar: did + past simple, is it correct? [closed]

I’ve noticed a few times where someone says something like “Did you made...” or “Did you worked...” when asking questions. Is this some kind of unofficial talk or is it completely incorrect ...
0
votes
1answer
553 views

What is the proper way to ask two questions in one sentence?

Every now and again I find myself writing a sentence like this: INPUT in LPINPUT is some data structure I can identify — what does LP mean, array? I don't know what to call this type of ...
1
vote
1answer
250 views

Using can and can't [duplicate]

She can barely cook a decent meal, ____ she? I think the answer is can’t. Please advise: what is the rule here? Therefore, if the question is asked: She can’t swim, ____ she? In this case, ...
2
votes
2answers
230 views

“What questions are there?” vs. “What are the questions there?”

Imagine this scene: "a non-native student asking another student about the questions in a paper on the table of the teacher". Which is the correct way for asking this between the two questions below: ...
-2
votes
2answers
183 views

why use a 'statistics' at the end of this sentence? is it correct? [closed]

You lock your car, you put valuables in the trunk and you even leave the empty glove box open. Is this sufficient to keep your vehicle off the car thefts statistics?
5
votes
1answer
719 views

Why do positive and negative variants of the same question elicit the same answer? [duplicate]

In common American English usage, these two questions elicit the same response: Do you have a ticket? Don't you have a ticket? These are the usual answers (I was going to say "possible answers" ...
-2
votes
3answers
199 views

Is there a tense issue in this sentence? [closed]

The garbage bags slipped from her hands, crashing to the ground.
-2
votes
2answers
118 views

“Do I believe the sky above” vs. “I do believe the sky above” [closed]

I’m Brazilian and I have a question. Why does Enya say the following in her song “Caribbean Blue”? So the world goes round and round With all you ever knew They say the sky high above Is ...
-1
votes
1answer
187 views

How can I increase my focus and pleasure in reading English? [closed]

After working on my oral skills in English for a couple of years, I know more interested in learning written English, specially by reading. I have been reading a couple of books over the last months ...
-1
votes
1answer
388 views

Is it ok to end a sentence with a preposition? [duplicate]

I have a sentence: It can be derived from either A or B. But I’m not sure how to ask the following question: Which one of them can it be derived from? Is that ok, or would it be better if ...
-1
votes
1answer
366 views

Do you say two baskets of apples?

Plural of basket is baskets. Plural of apple is apples. Assuming there is more than one apple in each basket. There are two baskets of apples. Is this sentence grammatically correct?
-3
votes
2answers
148 views

Length of answer! [closed]

When should I answer in short and when should I answer in long? In real life which of following answer is used? Did you read that book? Yes. Yes, I did. Yes, I read it. Yes, I did. I ...
1
vote
3answers
4k views

Can a semicolon be used to separate questions? [closed]

Did you see Survivor last night; it was crazy, right? Did you see Survivor last night? It was crazy, right? Can a semicolon separate questions? Which one is correct?
0
votes
1answer
197 views

Where to put a person's name in a question?

When I'm asking a person about something where should I put a person's name? Which of the following is correct? Jem do you know....? Do you know Jem...?
-1
votes
2answers
112 views

Post Question To

If Craig wrote a question on an online forum and the question was intended for Larry: Craig posted a question to Larry. Should the part "to Larry" modify "a question", or "posted"? In ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

How manieth as an ordinal number question [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How should I phrase a question that must be answered with an ordinal number (e.g., the third prime)? In my native tongue, Malayalam, there is a question word - ...
1
vote
3answers
313 views

“Have you no shame?”

Are these questions grammatically correct? Have you no shame? Have you no money? Has he a friend? or it is not allowed to use have and has (in this situation) to make a question?
1
vote
3answers
23k views

What is the best answer to the question “How are you” in business meetings? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When someone asks, “How are you?” Every time when my colleges from USA ask me "How are you?" I don't know what should I answer. I think that answer like "Fine, thanks. ...
2
votes
2answers
332 views

Is a question beginning with “How to” grammatically correct?

How to fix my computer? How to save money? Are these grammatically correct questions?
1
vote
3answers
218 views

The use of question formation in non-question phrases?

I have read the following text some time ago: [...] Only here can you enjoy dazzling entertainment, get the thrill of your life on the exciting rides, and be face-to-face with some of the ...
-1
votes
2answers
165 views

Why didn't someone… or Why someone didn't [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Where am I?” vs. “Where I am?” What is the correct form of such a grammar construction? I'd like to ask why someone didn't do something and I don't know which form is ...
3
votes
2answers
302 views

“Does he go bowling?” or “Doesn't he go bowling?”

Let's say we know a boy called Jonny and he goes bowling twice a week. My daughter has asked me which of the following questions are correct. Does Jonny go bowling? Doesn't Jonny go ...
1
vote
2answers
259 views

Grammaticality of linking two questions like “how often” and “why” together

I would like to ask the postage department the questions like "how often the packages got lost in the mail" and "why the packages got lost in the mail". While it is absolutely correct in Russian to ...
0
votes
0answers
57 views

How would you phrase questions that require an “interrogative ordinal” which is absent in English? [duplicate]

Duplicate of: How should I phrase a question that must be answered with an ordinal number (e.g., the third prime)? How to phrase an asking sentence that must be answered with an ordinal number? ...
0
votes
1answer
91 views

What is the better form to ask with 'when'? [closed]

There are a few options here: When is the end of the world? When the end of the world happens? When is the end of the world going? When does the end of the world happen? Any wrong options here? ...
1
vote
1answer
246 views

Answering a negatively-expressed question [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How to answer a negative question without ambiguity? 2). Didn't we park on the C level? (A) Yes, I sure thought we did. (B) No, we'll park on the D level. (C) ...
1
vote
1answer
98 views

“What/when is the right time for doing this?”

Which one of the following sounds more natural? What is the right time for doing this? When is the right time for doing this? It seems like these both mean the same thing. If they convey ...
-2
votes
2answers
297 views

Where to place the word “easily”? [closed]

Where should I place the word easily — before or after edit and share your bookmarks? Do you want to edit and share your bookmarks easily? or Do you want to easily edit and share your ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

What is the courteous alternative of “Do you understand what I say?”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Does it make sense?” or “Do you understand me?”? "Do you get me?", "Do you get my point?", etc? What is the courteous alternative of "Do you understand what I say?"?
7
votes
3answers
1k views

When to use nah or right in a sentence

When I was chatting with my friend, as a part of our conversation I used a phrase. "You have laptop nah." He replied, first try to change your English, it sounds ridiculous, using words nah, right. ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

“Where am I?” vs. “Where I am?” [closed]

Which is more correct to say in a question? (For example a guy that wakes up in a train) "Where am I?" or "Where I am?"
1
vote
0answers
78 views

What is the question for which the answer is “This is my third coffee today”? [duplicate]

Duplicate of: How should I phrase a question that must be answered with an ordinal number (e.g., the third prime)? Framing a question to which the answer is an ordinal number How manyth son ...
-3
votes
3answers
301 views

“Why you no…?” or “What that no…?” — are those grammatically correct? [closed]

Why you no come? Why you no talk English? Why you no have a girlfriend? What kind of English are these sentences? Are these types of sentences grammatically correct?
22
votes
1answer
690 views

Is “Did you it?” a valid question?

My English teacher always asks “Did you it?” when she wants to know whether some student has done an exercise. I think her question sounds horrible, and I believe it is wrong. In my opinion, she ...
1
vote
0answers
22 views

Interrogative sentences without auxiliary verbs and declarative sentences with auxiliary verbs [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is it OK to add a question mark to show inflection? Sometimes, auxiliary verbs or helping verbs are not present in some interrogative sentences in some specific contexts ...
1
vote
1answer
394 views

What will be the question for “he is my second son” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How should I phrase a question that must be answered with an ordinal number (e.g., the third prime)? How do you convert the sentence “George Washington was the first ...
6
votes
4answers
210 views

How do teachers ask to calculate expressions?

How do American/British primary school teachers ask their pupils to calculate an expression? E.g. What is 2+3 equal to? What is the value of 2+3? ... In particular, I'm interested whether the ...
0
votes
3answers
3k views

Which is more correct, “Which one do you want?” or “What one do you want?” [closed]

Which of the following is correct? Which one do you want? What one do you want?
2
votes
1answer
812 views

What are questions like “why did the chicken cross the road” called?

What are questions like Why did the chicken cross the road? called? I want to know if there is a particular term given to these type of questions.
2
votes
9answers
430 views

How do I ask “when” without implying past or future?

"When did or will the event happen?" — This sounds silly to me. To make matters worse, I would like to use passive voice because the question is in reference to a statement that uses passive voice. ...
2
votes
4answers
28k views

How to ask in a polite way

I am an international student in the U.S.A. I am writing an email and I am stuck on one sentence. I would like to say: "Do you know when I can get the flyers?" I would like to make the sentence more ...
15
votes
3answers
3k views

How does one correctly punctuate a sentence that declares that one has a question? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Punctuation with “The question is…” '.', '?' or ' “… ?” ' Position of question mark when sentence doesn't end ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

“You have nothing to do” - “Yes I do” / “Yes I don't” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When a negative question is asked, what is the grammatically correct way to answer? How to answer a negative question without ambiguity? If someone says "You have ...