This tag is for questions related to the formation, or answering of questions.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

3
votes
0answers
486 views

Interrogative form of a sentence [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How should I phrase a question that must be answered with an ordinal number (e.g., the third prime)? How to ask a question to get a cardinal number answer Neil ...
2
votes
9answers
396 views

How do I ask “when” without implying past or future?

"When did or will the event happen?" — This sounds silly to me. To make matters worse, I would like to use passive voice because the question is in reference to a statement that uses passive voice. ...
2
votes
7answers
6k views

Polite phrase to ask for details [closed]

Usually, I send to a client "Cover Letter" with phrase "May I get the details?", if I need to get more information about his project. Suddenly, I have discovered that it is not very polite. And now I ...
2
votes
3answers
5k views

Is “To whom could we direct our questions to?” grammatical?

I was wondering which of these sentences are proper? If we have further questions with regards to x&y, to whom could we direct our questions? If we have further questions with regards to ...
2
votes
4answers
19k views

How to ask in a polite way

I am an international student in the U.S.A. I am writing an email and I am stuck on one sentence. I would like to say: "Do you know when I can get the flyers?" I would like to make the sentence more ...
2
votes
4answers
2k views

Punctuation around the word “OK” at the end of a sentence

If a sentence ends in "OK", and the sentence is a request, usually there is a comma before the OK and a question mark after it. The comma signifies a pause, correct? What if there was no pause, then ...
2
votes
3answers
264 views

Expression for asking a question in a way that assumes a certain solution?

Especially (but not only) with technical problems, people often ask questions in a way that assumes a certain solution. For example: Where can I get a cheap taxi to the airport? But the person ...
2
votes
4answers
544 views

Asking somebody to select between two or more options

Assume we want to ask somebody to choose between two options. Each option is a phrase like "stay home" or "come with me". What is the correct form of asking such questions? Do you want to stay ...
2
votes
2answers
268 views

Is a question beginning with “How to” grammatically correct?

How to fix my computer? How to save money? Are these grammatically correct questions?
2
votes
2answers
713 views

What do you do when you end the first part of a compound sentence with a quote? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How should I punctuate around quotes? For example, if I want to show someone's response in the same sentence, what would I do? Would the comma from the end of the quote ...
2
votes
2answers
8k views

Punctuation with “The question is…” '.', '?' or ' “… ?” ' [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Position of question mark when sentence doesn't end with question Take this statement for example: That's not the question. The question is what was Colonel ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

“You have nothing to do” - “Yes I do” / “Yes I don't” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When a negative question is asked, what is the grammatically correct way to answer? How to answer a negative question without ambiguity? If someone says "You have ...
2
votes
3answers
28k views

“What about you?” versus “How about you?”

E.g. I'm going straight home after work. How about you? I'm going straight home after work. What about you? They both seem to work interchangeably, but there feels like a subtle ...
2
votes
2answers
246 views

Is this correct grammar — “which feature in C/C++ don't you like?”

The question in question is this: Which feature in C/C++ don't you like? Just wanted to know if that is proper way of asking. Not sure if "don't you like" is the right way there.
2
votes
1answer
719 views

How to answer “The applicant’s overall rank is ? out of ? ”

I am filling a reference form and I met 2 questions that I am not sure how to answer : The applicant’s overall rank is __ out of ___ Please describe the comparison group: __ If the ...
2
votes
6answers
358 views

How to answer this question? Yes or No [duplicate]

Sorry, if this question is naive. If someone asks me, "You didn't go to school today, right?" If I did not, should I answer, Yes or No? Similarly, "You do not like eating fish, do you?" ...
2
votes
4answers
7k views

Difference between “can” and “may” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Can/May/Will you help me with this? Which is correct if I want to request for a pen? Can I have your pen please? May I have your pen please?
2
votes
4answers
2k views

Question phrases to make sure that everything is understood correctly

I am looking for the best question phrases to make sure that everything is understood correctly. – Trains to London leave on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays and ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

“For how long have you been…” vs. “how long have you been…”

Ante-scriptum: The question should be quite a frequently arising one, so this might be a duplicate. If it is, I haven't found it previously asked here I don't know if the title is meaningful, but ...
2
votes
1answer
60 views

Why are these questions structured differently?

How many rooms does your apartment have? How many rooms have carpeting? I'm a native speaker of English teaching at a language school. Recently I was stumped by a question made by a student. ...
2
votes
1answer
227 views

How do you say x in x language? What's the English/Spanish word for x?

Is it correct to ask "how do you say 'tower' in Spanish?" or should we actually ask "what's the Spanish word for 'tower'?" Some people say that if I ask "how do you say..." the answer would be softly, ...
2
votes
1answer
200 views

A single word for this type of question

What is a single word used to describe the following question in the following scenario: John comes in from the supermarket having not brought the jam and his brother says to him: 'Why didn't ...
2
votes
3answers
37 views

Can a dash work after a question mark?

Can a dash work after a question mark? Meaning is this sentence correct and if not how would you rewrite it? I am wondering if you know any publications, blogs or websites who are seeking new ...
2
votes
2answers
60 views

Answering a negative question with one word

There has been talk of how to answer a negative question without ambiguity, most often with a qualifying phrase needed for clarification. (For example, "yes, I do"/"no, I don't.) I've noticed that ...
2
votes
3answers
300 views

“This helps us how?” vs. “How does this help us?”

In the sci-fi movie Inception by Christopher Nolan, in the first level of dreaming, they kidnap Cilian Murphy and Tom Hardy tries to get some information from him, by impersonating Browning, his ...
2
votes
2answers
143 views

“With what […]?” or “What […] with?”

Making a comparison with Who/Whom I now have a doubt about the use of what with prepositions in questions. I'll explain by example: These two sentences are correct, one is more formal than the other: ...
2
votes
1answer
347 views

What are “How to … ?” questions (errors) called?

I see questions formed like "How to do this?" every day. They are so frequent that I wonder if there is a name for grammatical errors of this kind.
2
votes
2answers
205 views

What is this kind of question known as?

A question that's not exactly rhetorical but the answer IS implied. for example; "am I annoying you?" you're meant to say no, and they are aware that they are indeed annoying you.
2
votes
1answer
605 views

A question ending with preposition “of” [duplicate]

I would like to know whether this is correct: He uses a car instead of a bus. What does he use a car instead of?
2
votes
1answer
639 views

Negative question; what's the affirmative answer here? [duplicate]

My wife and I communicate in English. She's Japanese, I'm Norwegian and we're both language enthusiasts; this makes for a lot of interesting language discussions. This is something that surfaced ...
2
votes
2answers
122 views

“Can I do X” vs. “Can't I do X”

Consider this scenarios: A: Can I do X? A: Can't I do X? In both the cases, the B replies with "Yes" to indicate A can do X and with "No" to indicate he cannot. The 1st one seems to ask for ...
2
votes
1answer
742 views

What are questions like “why did the chicken cross the road” called?

What are questions like Why did the chicken cross the road? called? I want to know if there is a particular term given to these type of questions.
2
votes
2answers
4k views

“What/When is the best time to call back?”

Which is better, and what is the difference? What is the best time to call back? When is the best time to call back?
2
votes
3answers
270 views

“Was it a girl?” or “Was that a girl?”

Here's a conversation. "I saw a salesperson there" "Was it a girl?" Is it OK to use "it" when you refer to the salesperson? Or should you use "that" instead of "it"?
2
votes
1answer
289 views

Is a question an independent clause?

Ex. Anyone going to the store? Often times in writing words get omitted in questions, such as the one above. Does that still make them "independent clauses" or must the sentence be able to stand as ...
2
votes
2answers
183 views

“What questions are there?” vs. “What are the questions there?”

Imagine this scene: "a non-native student asking another student about the questions in a paper on the table of the teacher". Which is the correct way for asking this between the two questions below: ...
2
votes
3answers
630 views

Using abbreviations incorrectly?

In English it's considered correct to ask I do it like this, don't I? or Why can't I go? whereas "don't" is an abbreviation of "do not" and "can't" is an abbreviation of "cannot". ...
2
votes
0answers
22 views

“A question in a question” [duplicate]

I've got two questions for you. Number one: I've always been confused about what I call "a question in a question" (maybe there is a technical term for that but I don't know it). What I mean is... ...
2
votes
1answer
294 views

Asking a question with “have” without do-support: “What symptoms has Anne?”

The context is that a doctor is asking about somebody's child's symptoms of influenza. Is this question correct: "What symptoms has Anne?" If it's incorrect, then why? It looks strange to me, I ...
2
votes
2answers
197 views

Past Perfect question forms with 'before' etc

A part of an entry about Past Perfect (424.1) in Swan's Practical English Usage 3rd Ed states that the past perfect is not necessary in the cases where we use conjunctions (e.g. after, as soon as) and ...
2
votes
0answers
402 views

How to frame a question to get answer about the turn that somebody has taken in doing something? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How should I phrase a question that must be answered with an ordinal number (e.g., the third prime)? How to ask a question to get a cardinal number answer I want to ...
2
votes
0answers
38 views

No and double inversion within question tags [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How to reply to question tags I'm a Dutch native speaker so forgive my English mistakes (that's why I am here). In Dutch it is normal to have a following example ...
2
votes
0answers
61 views

“You went there?” in English [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is it OK to add a question mark to show inflection? Can we say in a conversation "You went there", and by stressing the statement, mean "Did you go?" I know one ...
2
votes
0answers
351 views

How do you say this in English? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicates: Framing a question to which the answer is an ordinal number How to phrase an asking sentence that must be answered with an ordinal number (e.g., the third prime) ? It ...
1
vote
2answers
273 views

Is it possible to describe something with a question?

On the of chance this being possible examples please.
1
vote
3answers
724 views

How to unambiguously ask a question with “OR”

I want to ask a question about a piece of text. Is the text about McDonalds Corporation or McDonalds Products? I want the answer to be "Yes"/"No", rather than "McDonalds Corporation"/"McDonalds ...
1
vote
2answers
160 views

“Why the sun shines?”

I've seen questions framed in the following manner many a time: "Why the sun shines?" "Why hair grows?" While the most correct way to frame these kind of questions is obviously: "Why does ...
1
vote
3answers
257 views

“Have you no shame?”

Are these questions grammatically correct? Have you no shame? Have you no money? Has he a friend? or it is not allowed to use have and has (in this situation) to make a question?
1
vote
6answers
426 views

Is there a word for this situation?

Some co-workers of mine from another office play a "question game." I wasn't there for the question, but here it is: Is it accidentally impregnating someone if you know you're trying to get her ...
1
vote
2answers
240 views

Grammaticality of linking two questions like “how often” and “why” together

I would like to ask the postage department the questions like "how often the packages got lost in the mail" and "why the packages got lost in the mail". While it is absolutely correct in Russian to ...