This tag is for questions related to the formation, or answering of questions.

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Why (so) sure? vs How (so) sure?

I just answered a question on ELL.SE that made me (and the OP) wonder about something... Consider the following four question responses to these two statements: 1- "I know I'll marry young." ...
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3answers
1k views

Are sentences that have multiple “WH Question” words considered grammatical?

Are sentences that have multiple "WH Question" words considered grammatical ? For example, is the following sentence grammatical: Tomorrow, where are we meeting at what time to do what ?
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4answers
7k views

Question phrases to make sure that everything is understood correctly

I am looking for the best question phrases to make sure that everything is understood correctly. – Trains to London leave on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays and ...
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2answers
383 views

“Can I have a question?”

Is this phrase used at all by native speakers? After almost 20 years of studying and speaking English, I've been told this is a phrase that almost every Czech speaker gets wrong - it seems that even ...
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4answers
14k views

Changing a statement into a question

Consider the following sentences: Every day I want to: read a book do my homework go jogging for 20 minutes be nice to my mom To convert these into the following questions: Did you: read a ...
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3answers
113 views

What English term is used to describe “sarcasm toward questions about trivial issues”?

The question is difficult to mention in a single line as a title, hence feel free to edit the title. Person-1: Did Brazil win the football match today? Person-2: People are dying across the ...
4
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2answers
259 views

How do I punctuate a question with a guessed answer in it?

How to punctuate a question directly followed by the asker's guess at the answer? E.g. What's in here? Your books? What's in here, your books? What's in here; your books? Which of ...
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3answers
4k views

Difference between “Does she have the book?” and “Has she the book?”

What is the difference between "Does she have the book?" and "Has she the book?"
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1answer
1k views

Is “who did what” grammatically correct?

Sometimes I wish to know what each person in a group of people did, or where each person went, or which book goes where. Is it correct to say, Who went where? Who did what? Who told whom? ...
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2answers
225 views

Syntax of “What proof have we?”

I'm a German and our English teacher always told us not to use the German syntax in English. So here are a few examples to illustrate : "What means this word?" -> correct : "What does that word mean?"...
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1answer
872 views

Are “do you think” embedded questions exceptions?

In most embedded questions, the "Wh" portion of the question stays grouped together with the rest of the converted question (e.g. "What time is it?" becomes "Could you tell me what time it is?"), the ...
4
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2answers
17k views

Rules for rising and falling intonation in similar questions - what are they?

Consider these two questions: Would you mind saying a little bit more about that? and What do you mean by that? When they perform the same function, and I expect an answer to both, why ...
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4answers
361 views

What do you call a question when the answer is in said question?

For example: "What religion are Buddhist Monks?" Obviously the answer is Buddhism, and the answer is in the question. What is this technique called?
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2answers
104 views

Passive voice, agency, and survey format

I'm designing an opinion survey and one of the factors I am thinking of manipulating is the way the question is phrased. Specifically, I'm thinking of contrasting the following two item phrasings: 1) ...
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votes
1answer
53k views

Thus far? vs So far? [duplicate]

I would like to know what is the difference between "How is your day thus far?" vs. How is your day so far? and if there is any significant difference between the two questions. I always assumed that ...
4
votes
4answers
924 views

Use of 'not' in questions

When is it okay to use 'not' when posing a question? I believe that the person asking would include the 'not 'when he believes the implied to be true. For example: "Are you going to the store? "Are ...
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votes
1answer
41k views

Use “have” or “has” any/anyone/anything in the question?

Similar to this question, is it correct to use have or has with any* (any/anything/anyone/...) in a question? Examples: Have/Has any of my advices help you? Have/Has anyone of you seen it? Does ...
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1answer
3k views

How manieth as an ordinal number question [duplicate]

Possible Duplicates: How should I phrase a question that must be answered with an ordinal number (e.g., the third prime)? How to ask a question to get an ordinal number answer In my native ...
4
votes
0answers
178 views

“Aren't I” vs “Amn't I” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why “ain't I” and “aren't I” instead of “amn't I”? Why do we say "aren't I" rather than "amn't I"? Is it purely for ease or ...
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6answers
760 views

“Was it a girl?” or “Was that a girl?”

Here's a conversation. "I saw a salesperson there" "Was it a girl?" Is it OK to use "it" when you refer to the salesperson? Or should you use "that" instead of "it"?
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4answers
702 views

Can I put the question word “where” at the end of a question? [closed]

I got this sentence from a Primary 5 student's worksheet. According to this passage, this creature can be found where? Some of the parents think that the sentence should be "..., where can ...
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votes
4answers
23k views

what is the difference between the words “tall” and “high”?

Are there any differences between the words "tall" and "high" ? For instance, tall building and high building I'm not sure what are the differences between them.
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4answers
982 views

Expression for asking a question in a way that assumes a certain solution?

Especially (but not only) with technical problems, people often ask questions in a way that assumes a certain solution. For example: Where can I get a cheap taxi to the airport? But the person ...
3
votes
2answers
408 views

“Does he go bowling?” or “Doesn't he go bowling?”

Let's say we know a boy called Jonny and he goes bowling twice a week. My daughter has asked me which of the following questions are correct. Does Jonny go bowling? Doesn't Jonny go bowling?...
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3answers
5k views

How to Identify a Rhetorical Question?

I am familiar with the idea of a rhetorical question, but are there any criteria to mark or identify one? Can a rhetorical question be recognized alone or does it need surrounding context? It doesn'...
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5answers
86k views

How to ask if a person has done/had breakfast?

Is it "Did you do breakfast?" or "Did you have/had breakfast?"
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3answers
218 views

What is the word for letters that do not ascend above the midline / uniform height? (i.e. aceuomnwxz, not btlj)

I found the word for the part of letters that rise above the midline (ascender: The part of a lowercase letter that rises above the main body of the letter (as in b, d, h). The part that extends above ...
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6answers
28k views

What is the question form of “used to do”?

What is the correct way to convert "used to do" into a question? Since I want to emphasize that the action is not on-going any more, so simple past tense is not a good idea here. Could I say "do xxx ...
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2answers
1k views

Why does the verb 'have' require 'do' or 'got' and cannot be used alone?

When I began to study English, about 50 years ago, I was taught to ask, for instance, 'Have you a car?' and, if the answer was negative, to answer 'I have not a car.' However, when I came back to ...
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3answers
22k views

“For how long have you been…” vs. “how long have you been…”

Ante-scriptum: The question should be quite a frequently arising one, so this might be a duplicate. If it is, I haven't found it previously asked here I don't know if the title is meaningful, but ...
3
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3answers
91 views

Why don't we use “do” in an interrogative object clause?

A friend of mine, an English learner (reasonably advanced), asked me to proofread the sentence "Could you tell me how many people you do have?" I told her to leave out the "do", but she was curious ...
3
votes
1answer
147 views

Replacing “do you have” with “have you”

Found a similar question here, but with some minor differences. Is it archaic to use have you in sentences such as this: John : I think we can see it with a specially crafted telescope. Mary : ...
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4answers
231 views

Can I say “Which area of triangle a or triangle b is larger”?

I am a math teacher in Asia. In one math question there are two triangles, A and B. I want to ask which has the larger area. Should I ask: "Which area of triangle a or triangle b is larger"? or ...
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3answers
1k views

“Which” or “what” for accepting multiple choices from a list [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Which” vs. “what” — what's the difference and when should you use one or the other? I know that, in the context of radio buttons (the options ...
3
votes
1answer
137 views

“How much X is in Y?” vs “How much X is there in Y?”

First: How much money is there in a bank? Second: How much money is in a bank? Honestly, both of them are the same for me, but who knows.. I am not a native speaker.
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2answers
498 views

Is it right/appropriate to say “double bag it?”

What one would say to get another (plastic) bag for carrying heavy groceries? Is it right to tell the cashier "would you please double bag it?" I am asking this question because when I tried to ...
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1answer
2k views

What are “How to … ?” questions (errors) called?

I see questions formed like "How to do this?" every day. They are so frequent that I wonder if there is a name for grammatical errors of this kind.
3
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1answer
414 views

Is it correct to use “are you” instead of “if you're”?

As an example: This is a good read, are you interested in more related topics. What are these type of sentences called? Does it follow the same grammar as: Should you require more ...
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2answers
130 views

Can “it's” be used as a question? [duplicate]

In my experience, people say "it's" in place of "it is," but never in the form of a question. I think the question "It's?" sounds awkward, but I'd like to know if it's grammatically correct. Is it? ...
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2answers
1k views

Ask someone about their birth order [duplicate]

If I need to ask someone about their birth order, what question is usually used? Let's say I do not ask how many children his family has first. What is your birth order? or Which child are you in ...
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2answers
1k views

Can words like “what” be the subject of a sentence?

In a question like "Who hears a noise?", is the subject of the sentence who? I can think of a few tests for subjects like: "the subject is the phrase that inverts with the auxiliary to form a ...
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3answers
818 views

Answering a negative question with one word

There has been talk of how to answer a negative question without ambiguity, most often with a qualifying phrase needed for clarification. (For example, "yes, I do"/"no, I don't.) I've noticed that ...
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3answers
3k views

Shall I answer Yes/No to this question?

I'm filling an application which asks the following question: You have not attended the X company Selection Process in the last 6 months. * Yes/No I've not attended any selection process. So, shall ...
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1answer
4k views

What's the English version of the German “oder?” [closed]

In German, you often add the question word oder after a statement (", oder?") to ask whether the statement's correct. What is the equivalent of oder in English? I always begin sentences with this ...
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1answer
1k views

What are questions like “why did the chicken cross the road” called?

What are questions like Why did the chicken cross the road? called? I want to know if there is a particular term given to these type of questions.
3
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1answer
298 views

“Do you also?” as a question?

I was able to find numerous examples of "Do you also..." type questions in The Bible, like: And Yeshua said to the twelve, “Do you also wish to leave?” But I am wondering whether simply "Do you ...
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2answers
38 views

What does the phrases “bedraggled remnant” and “but otherwise” mean? What does the sentence mean?

In the quote: The Hoover administration had deployed tanks and tear gas to drive a bedraggled remnant of World War I veterans (the Bonus Marchers) from Washington but otherwise appeared incapable ...
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2answers
398 views

Word order for subordinate questions

I know subordinate questions have no inversion. Should this sentence: "Do you know what are the good things to do around here?" be "Do you know what the good things are to do around here?...
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1answer
2k views

“Why don't you” . . . with. . . “be” . . .?

I confuse about how to use "Why don't you" with "be". I know that we can use "Why don't you" with "Verb" such as Why don't you go with me? However I confuse that if we can use these two sentences. ...
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3answers
1k views

How to write a question with a suggested answer at the end

How do you properly convey in writing a sentence where a question is asked and followed by a suggested answer? For example, the question "What are we having for dinner?" is asked, and the guess "...