This tag is for questions related to the formation, or answering of questions.

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-6
votes
1answer
158 views

“How long did it take?” or “How long did it takes?”? [closed]

Which one is the correct one? I think is the second one, but my english book says it is the first.
3
votes
2answers
103 views

Can “it's” be used as a question? [duplicate]

In my experience, people say "it's" in place of "it is," but never in the form of a question. I think the question "It's?" sounds awkward, but I'd like to know if it's grammatically correct. Is it? ...
1
vote
2answers
36 views

Question on hypotheticals

In the following sentence: We need to approach the two experts and convince them to help. Their contribution will be huge and will advance this field in the company." Regarding the latter half, ...
1
vote
2answers
61 views

Is “moonstruck adventure” an actual term/expression? [closed]

Encountered the phrase "moonstruck adventure" repeatedly in a text i'm dealing with (in the context of bad decisions made by someone that nearly led to disastrous results) - is that a proper term or ...
0
votes
1answer
66 views

Which is correct, on or upon?

In the following example, would it be correct to replace both uses of 'upon'? Tom further encouraged Blain's team regarding the proposed trade deal, adding that before everything would be agreed ...
1
vote
2answers
88 views

Correct structure and in sentence? [closed]

Is the grammar and structure in the following line correct (specifically in the marked section)? In light of this, it was very much in the interests of myself, the relevant department heads, and ...
0
votes
1answer
56 views

That or which in a sentence [duplicate]

Should this: We believed the issues which would be on the agenda were too problematic at the time" Be like this? We believed the issues that would be on the agenda were too problematic at ...
2
votes
2answers
80 views

Hypothetical would/will in past perspective

When writing of past conversations and perspectives, is it correct to use 'will' to reference a possibility that did happen (and might still be relevant), followed by 'would' for a possibility that ...
0
votes
2answers
47 views

Which of the forms is correct? [closed]

Which of the following should be used? "While in office in 2002, Andrew did not intend to touch that issue." "While in office in 2002, Andrew had no intention of touching that issue."
0
votes
3answers
107 views

Negative Questions:

You have a large house. Negative question= Don't you have a large house? Saying ''Haven't you a large house?'' is wrong am i correct? But is ''Haven't you got a large house?'' correct or wrong?
0
votes
1answer
28 views

is this a form of denial? [closed]

Is it called denial if I see and notice my dog but don't pay attention to it? If it is can you give me a description of denial in that form, me and my brother are in a debate about it, I say it is ...
4
votes
2answers
92 views

Passive voice, agency, and survey format

I'm designing an opinion survey and one of the factors I am thinking of manipulating is the way the question is phrased. Specifically, I'm thinking of contrasting the following two item phrasings: 1) ...
-1
votes
2answers
193 views

How do i know if the word is step or glide in English [closed]

today I have a lesson in school about steps and glides and i didn't understand it. My first question what are steps and glides? My second question is how do i know if the sentence ends with steps or ...
0
votes
2answers
3k views

what is the difference between verbal and oral? [closed]

what is the difference between verbal and oral ? I am looking forward to the answer and I appreciate your effort
0
votes
1answer
172 views

Is the question form of a statement truly implicit?

We have statements, and we have questions. A request made in the form of a statement has a question equivalent. But is that question equivalent implicit, or is it simply a rewording of the statement ...
-2
votes
2answers
91 views

Who did/do I met today on the way to work? [closed]

Lets say you have the sentence Today I've met an old coleague on the way to work. What is the question going to be: Who did/do I met today on the way to work? did or do, and why? EDIT: ...
3
votes
2answers
301 views

Word order for subordinate questions

I know subordinate questions have no inversion. Should this sentence: "Do you know what are the good things to do around here?" be "Do you know what the good things are to do around ...
0
votes
2answers
348 views

Which of these statements is correct? [closed]

A friend and I were discussing a past event and she said: "I don't know when you left yesterday" but I thought she ought to say: "I don't know when you leave yesterday" Please tell me ...
2
votes
1answer
154 views

What job don't students like very much?

I need to have my English students read a pie chart containing information about jobs. One of the questions I wrote is: "What job don't students like very much?" (They are expected to read the ...
3
votes
2answers
875 views

Ask someone about their birth order [duplicate]

If I need to ask someone about their birth order, what question is usually used? Let's say I do not ask how many children his family has first. What is your birth order? or Which child are you in ...
0
votes
5answers
573 views

What is a word to describe a response to a question that is evasive but not untrue [duplicate]

I'm looking for a single word synonym of evasion, fudging or dodging the question that does not imply deceit in the answer (apart from possible awareness of the respondent that they are not actually ...
3
votes
1answer
224 views

On Interrogative Sentence [duplicate]

Is it correct to make a sentence interrogative only with question mark (and tone) and without following essential grammatical rules? For example, people usually say You are going to the stadium? ...
2
votes
1answer
348 views

Can I have multiple question marks in one sentence? [duplicate]

When I ask multiple questions at once should I break it up into multiple sentences and capitalize the first letter at the beginning of each question(?), or should I use one question mark at the very ...
3
votes
1answer
138 views

Replacing “do you have” with “have you”

Found a similar question here, but with some minor differences. Is it archaic to use have you in sentences such as this: John : I think we can see it with a specially crafted telescope. Mary : ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

“Don't you…” question

I'm studying English for 10 months. I suppose myself to know it quite well now. But I'm confused about one thing. I noticed that some of my English speaking friends sometimes ask "Don't you ...
-1
votes
1answer
72 views

The/a/an usage question [duplicate]

In the book I am studying in , I saw these two sentences: After a university education, she got married. These days, women have as good an education as men, which I think is a good thing ...
0
votes
1answer
241 views

Using the phrase 'a number of' with countable/uncountable nouns and verbs in singular/plural [closed]

Find the mistake: Every year, an enormous number of paper is used to produce books. My thoughts so far: After googling I found that when using "a number of" we use plural verb (i.e., are). Is ...
0
votes
1answer
118 views

Question using this structure “Since … is …, could we …?”

I want to give a fact and then make a question. like this: Since this info is important for investigation, could we store it for later use? Is that correct?
0
votes
0answers
200 views

Do you use a question mark or period in this sentence?

"What happened, if you don't mind me asking." If you split it in to two different sentences: "What happened?" and "If you don't mind me asking." you can tell where the question mark and period goes. ...
0
votes
1answer
166 views

“How much” questions without auxiliary verb

Are all these questions and their answers possible? a) How much costs this book? -> Ten dollars costs this book. (Ten dollars as a singular subject, the price). b) How much costs this book? -> Ten ...
0
votes
4answers
193 views

Is there a term for a question that is only a question because of a question mark? [duplicate]

I sent a friend a question in the form: Just trying to remember how we know each other? That is a "statement" without the question mark at the end. Is there a term for this? Since it does not ...
2
votes
1answer
215 views

Is asking a question in the form 'What that impression might be?' acceptable?

Someone wrote to me - Because you have an impression of me that's not true maybe. I responded What that impression might be? Is that acceptable or not?
0
votes
1answer
38 views

“How do you…?” --> “You have to…?” / “I have to…?”

I need help. Is it correct to answer How do you...? type of questions with You have to...? For example, Person A: How do you wash your clothes? Person B: First, you have to separate colored ...
0
votes
1answer
75 views

Use of “If you really want to”

If somebody says, "If you really want to leave me, then let me know," which reply would be correct in the English language—"Yes I do" or "Yes I really do"?
3
votes
2answers
194 views

Responding to a question correctly with yes or no [duplicate]

This question has been irking me for a while and I cannot seem to find any answer. Take something simple such as: Question:"Did you not enjoy eating at the restaurant?" Response: "No." ...
1
vote
1answer
50 views

How do I respond to this? [closed]

I asked someone how their day is going. They responded "Hello and it's going lol" how do i respond to that? or was that a way of saying dont bother me?
3
votes
1answer
166 views

Can you use a semicolon to separate a question?

e.g., "I'm ordering five guys; do you want some?
0
votes
0answers
1k views

A polite form to change the time of an appointment

I want to ask what the best form for changing a meeting time is. What is the formal way for suggesting another time? Is my sentence ok? Also, is obligatory the right way to describe a class which I ...
3
votes
3answers
317 views

How to answer this “as … as” comparison?

With the question, "Is [noun1] as [adjective] as [noun2]?", should one answer in the negative or affirmative when [noun1] is more [adjective] than [noun2]? Example: Animal Top speed ======= ...
1
vote
1answer
274 views

To make it clear + question (or to be sure, to make sure)

"To make it clear", "To be sure", "To make sure" + Question I'm wondering if I can use some of them like this?: To make clear, what is the most important requirement for the project? To be sure, ...
0
votes
1answer
183 views

Is the question “If you didn't break the vase, who did?” a conditional sentence?

My problem is that I was taught (I think wrongly) that whenever a conditional sentence refers to past, there should be past perfect tense in the if clause, as in example 1. Example 1: If you ...
3
votes
2answers
205 views

Position of interrogative auxiliary verbs as replies to statements [closed]

Imagine someone states the following to you: I think you're mistaken. We've never traveled to Italy together. What's the difference between the following two responses, if any? Haven't we? ...
0
votes
0answers
29 views

For what period of time [duplicate]

There is a mathematical model. Model can give a forecast for some duration (hours, days, years). But the forecast will not be equally accurate for different periods of time. How should I ask for what ...
0
votes
1answer
139 views

“Which course are you enrolled in?” vs. “Under which course are you enrolled?”

If I want to ask someone about the course they are taking, what would be the more appropriate usage: Which course are you enrolled in? Under which course are you enrolled?
2
votes
1answer
115 views

The use of 'there' in questions

I'm an English teacher in Belgium and would like to know the following... I gave my students the sentence 'There were a lot of people in the shop.' I asked my students to make a good question to get ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

Can words like “what” be the subject of a sentence?

In a question like "Who hears a noise?", is the subject of the sentence who? I can think of a few tests for subjects like: "the subject is the phrase that inverts with the auxiliary to form a ...
25
votes
17answers
3k views

A question asked in order to expose ignorance

I am looking for a particular word that describes: a question that is asked in order to expose ignorance/lack of knowledge. As with a rhetorical question, the questioner knows the answer, but ...
0
votes
2answers
72 views

How easy it is or How easy is it [duplicate]

The actual sentence goes like this: How easy it is to integrate the two applications? or How easy is it to integrate the two applications? To my understanding 'How easy it is' wrong if used as a ...
0
votes
2answers
550 views

Answering a multiple-choice question with “yes”?

I don't know if it's my incompetence in the English language, or if it's other people trying to mess with my head, but... When you ask someone a question such as "What do you like, X or Y?", and they ...
2
votes
2answers
208 views

Is saying 'What did you think' acceptable?

Can you please tell me what is correct: The situation is that you have been to a movie with another person. At the end of the movie you ask: What did you think of the movie? I want to know ...