This tag is for questions related to the formation, or answering of questions.

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2
votes
2answers
205 views

“With what […]?” or “What […] with?”

Making a comparison with Who/Whom I now have a doubt about the use of what with prepositions in questions. I'll explain by example: These two sentences are correct, one is more formal than the other: ...
2
votes
1answer
384 views

Is a question an independent clause?

Ex. Anyone going to the store? Often times in writing words get omitted in questions, such as the one above. Does that still make them "independent clauses" or must the sentence be able to stand as ...
-1
votes
1answer
79 views

Why do we say “is it” when asking a question rather than “it is”? [closed]

What it says on the tin, a foreign friend of mine has asked and I can't tell him; apart from it sounding horrible. For example: "Why is it raining today?" Instead of: "Why it is raining today?"
1
vote
3answers
329 views

The Drop - meaning of “get to” [closed]

What does "get to" mean in the following excerpt taken from the book "The Drop" by Michael Connelly? The "Get to" is at the end of the excerpt. I have written it in bold. Thank you very much for the ...
6
votes
2answers
10k views

I was wondering if there are synonyms for “I was wondering”

Often I ask a question (by e-mail), and precede the question with I was wondering if... For example I was wondering if you can give me your office hrs? Why not just simply ask the real question? ...
1
vote
1answer
168 views

Question marks in written conversation [duplicate]

Should a question mark appear at the end of question (and before the end quotation mark)? An example is "How are you feeling today," he asked. I'm getting conflicting advice.
1
vote
1answer
4k views

“Is it right?” or “Is it correct?” [duplicate]

Which question is more proper? [some statement], is it right? [some statement], is it correct?
3
votes
2answers
248 views

Is it right/appropriate to say “double bag it?”

What one would say to get another (plastic) bag for carrying heavy groceries? Is it right to tell the cashier "would you please double bag it?" I am asking this question because when I tried to ...
1
vote
1answer
208 views

How to puncutuate when using self imposed questions in a declarative sentence

I have toyed with using a colon and keeping the question marks or even ditching the question marks. See below: Admittedly I was apprehensive at first to approach the prisoner, all I could think ...
0
votes
1answer
604 views

Ending a declarative statement with a question mark? [duplicate]

Recently, there was a debate as to when one can legitimately end a declarative statement with a question mark, like writing “I don’t know?” as an answer, and what that could possibly mean. The ...
-4
votes
1answer
935 views

What’s the difference between “how” and “how so”? [closed]

Please tell me the difference between these two questions: how how so Do those two mean the same thing? If they do not, please explain with examples.
0
votes
0answers
45 views

Question structure + prepositions [duplicate]

What did you buy the computer with? What did you give them an overview of? Are they correct?
1
vote
1answer
75 views

Grammaticality of “Is it today that…”

I would like to know if it is grammatically correct to ask the question, "Is it today that you are going to town?" My concern is specifically the "Is it" part.
2
votes
1answer
282 views

How do you say x in x language? What's the English/Spanish word for x?

Is it correct to ask "how do you say 'tower' in Spanish?" or should we actually ask "what's the Spanish word for 'tower'?" Some people say that if I ask "how do you say..." the answer would be softly, ...
1
vote
1answer
33 views

“Shot dead” v/s unfortunate or sudden demise

Is it possible to use the word "shot dead" for unfortunate or sudden demise of a person not due to a gun shot?
2
votes
1answer
689 views

A question ending with preposition “of” [duplicate]

I would like to know whether this is correct: He uses a car instead of a bus. What does he use a car instead of?
-1
votes
1answer
1k views

Present tense in a question with verb in past tense [closed]

I have got following two questions. I wanted to ask am I correct in thinking that we can’t test token system? I wanted to ask was I correct in thinking that we couldn't test token system? I ...
0
votes
1answer
132 views

“he is too young to go to school, is he ” or “he is too young to go to school, isn't he?” [duplicate]

Can you tell me which of the following sentences is correct? why? a) He is too young to go to school, is he? b) He is too young to go to school, isn't he?
-1
votes
1answer
568 views

How to use tag questions in sentences containing: 'as well as', 'along with', 'neither…nor'… etc.? [closed]

I need the rules of using tag questions in sentences containing: as well as, along with, neither....nor..., either....or... etc. For instance: I as well as my friends am going to the party, _?
-2
votes
2answers
129 views

Question:Is this hotel selling cigarettes? [closed]

I am confused with this question: "Is this hotel selling cigarettes?" or "Does this hotel sell cigarettes?" "Is this computer working?" or "Does this computer work?" Which one is correct? Is there ...
1
vote
4answers
542 views

Is “How do you … ?” a polite question to ask the right way to do things? [closed]

Sometimes I feel uncomfortable to say "How do you spell xxx ?". It sounds like asking his or her own way of spelling a word implicating that I am not necessarily expecting the correct answer. Is "How ...
-3
votes
2answers
111 views

How else should I avoid using “under” at the end of the sentence [closed]

Although it's acceptable to use prepositions at the end of the sentence, it's not favorable to grammarians or grammar teachers. How else could I rephrase the question: Which license are airplan ...
2
votes
1answer
455 views

What are “How to … ?” questions (errors) called?

I see questions formed like "How to do this?" every day. They are so frequent that I wonder if there is a name for grammatical errors of this kind.
1
vote
1answer
277 views

“Is you is or is you ain't my baby?” [duplicate]

Is this phrase grammatically correct? Is you is or is you ain't my baby? It's from a Tom and Jerry cartoon: http://vimeo.com/40283242 (at 1:30, 2:00 and 3:00).
1
vote
1answer
2k views

Should I use a semicolon or a colon to introduce a question at the end of a sentence? [duplicate]

Which of the following is punctuated correctly? My question for you is: how do I do that? My question for you is; how do I do that? Or should it be something different altogether?
2
votes
1answer
822 views

Negative question; what's the affirmative answer here? [duplicate]

My wife and I communicate in English. She's Japanese, I'm Norwegian and we're both language enthusiasts; this makes for a lot of interesting language discussions. This is something that surfaced ...
2
votes
0answers
24 views

“A question in a question” [duplicate]

I've got two questions for you. Number one: I've always been confused about what I call "a question in a question" (maybe there is a technical term for that but I don't know it). What I mean is... ...
4
votes
1answer
347 views

Is “who did what” grammatically correct?

Sometimes I wish to know what each person in a group of people did, or where each person went, or which book goes where. Is it correct to say, Who went where? Who did what? Who told whom? ...
2
votes
1answer
348 views

Asking a question with “have” without do-support: “What symptoms has Anne?”

The context is that a doctor is asking about somebody's child's symptoms of influenza. Is this question correct: "What symptoms has Anne?" If it's incorrect, then why? It looks strange to me, I ...
0
votes
1answer
666 views

What's the English version of the German “oder?” [closed]

In German, you often add the question word oder after a statement (", oder?") to ask whether the statement's correct. What is the equivalent of oder in English? I always begin sentences with this ...
2
votes
2answers
213 views

Past Perfect question forms with 'before' etc

A part of an entry about Past Perfect (424.1) in Swan's Practical English Usage 3rd Ed states that the past perfect is not necessary in the cases where we use conjunctions (e.g. after, as soon as) and ...
-1
votes
1answer
406 views

Is the answer to this question “neither” or “either”?

She doesn't think so or you don't think so? Is it grammatically correct to respond with Either. or Neither. to this question? Or does this depend on the meaning intended to be ...
-2
votes
3answers
366 views

“What keeps him going?” vs. “What does him keep going?” [duplicate]

Why is the grammatical structure of "What keeps him going?" right? I got a bit confused over this, when I realized that this structure fundamentally contradicts the basic rule I teach my students: ...
-1
votes
1answer
201 views

Colon usage after an imperative sentence in survey instructions

Consider a survey question that asks a question and then gives instruction about how to respond. For example, Is this a sample survey question? Check all that apply: __ yes __ no Is it ...
1
vote
1answer
122 views

“Why not” and double negatives

This popped up during a conversation. My friend said (roughly): Some vegetarians don't eat meat. Why not fish? To me, this felt somewhat weird. Her intent was to ask, if some vegetarians refuse ...
2
votes
2answers
133 views

“Can I do X” vs. “Can't I do X”

Consider this scenarios: A: Can I do X? A: Can't I do X? In both the cases, the B replies with "Yes" to indicate A can do X and with "No" to indicate he cannot. The 1st one seems to ask for ...
-5
votes
1answer
162 views

Grammar: did + past simple, is it correct? [closed]

I’ve noticed a few times where someone says something like “Did you made...” or “Did you worked...” when asking questions. Is this some kind of unofficial talk or is it completely incorrect ...
0
votes
1answer
462 views

What is the proper way to ask two questions in one sentence?

Every now and again I find myself writing a sentence like this: INPUT in LPINPUT is some data structure I can identify — what does LP mean, array? I don't know what to call this type of ...
1
vote
1answer
233 views

Using can and can't [duplicate]

She can barely cook a decent meal, ____ she? I think the answer is can’t. Please advise: what is the rule here? Therefore, if the question is asked: She can’t swim, ____ she? In this case, ...
2
votes
2answers
219 views

“What questions are there?” vs. “What are the questions there?”

Imagine this scene: "a non-native student asking another student about the questions in a paper on the table of the teacher". Which is the correct way for asking this between the two questions below: ...
-2
votes
2answers
178 views

why use a 'statistics' at the end of this sentence? is it correct? [closed]

You lock your car, you put valuables in the trunk and you even leave the empty glove box open. Is this sufficient to keep your vehicle off the car thefts statistics?
5
votes
1answer
630 views

Why do positive and negative variants of the same question elicit the same answer? [duplicate]

In common American English usage, these two questions elicit the same response: Do you have a ticket? Don't you have a ticket? These are the usual answers (I was going to say "possible answers" ...
-2
votes
3answers
189 views

Is there a tense issue in this sentence? [closed]

The garbage bags slipped from her hands, crashing to the ground.
-2
votes
2answers
117 views

“Do I believe the sky above” vs. “I do believe the sky above” [closed]

I’m Brazilian and I have a question. Why does Enya say the following in her song “Caribbean Blue”? So the world goes round and round With all you ever knew They say the sky high above Is ...
-1
votes
1answer
181 views

How can I increase my focus and pleasure in reading English? [closed]

After working on my oral skills in English for a couple of years, I know more interested in learning written English, specially by reading. I have been reading a couple of books over the last months ...
-1
votes
1answer
368 views

Is it ok to end a sentence with a preposition? [duplicate]

I have a sentence: It can be derived from either A or B. But I’m not sure how to ask the following question: Which one of them can it be derived from? Is that ok, or would it be better if ...
-1
votes
1answer
325 views

Do you say two baskets of apples?

Plural of basket is baskets. Plural of apple is apples. Assuming there is more than one apple in each basket. There are two baskets of apples. Is this sentence grammatically correct?
-3
votes
2answers
143 views

Length of answer! [closed]

When should I answer in short and when should I answer in long? In real life which of following answer is used? Did you read that book? Yes. Yes, I did. Yes, I read it. Yes, I did. I ...
1
vote
3answers
4k views

Can a semicolon be used to separate questions? [closed]

Did you see Survivor last night; it was crazy, right? Did you see Survivor last night? It was crazy, right? Can a semicolon separate questions? Which one is correct?
0
votes
1answer
172 views

Where to put a person's name in a question?

When I'm asking a person about something where should I put a person's name? Which of the following is correct? Jem do you know....? Do you know Jem...?