This tag is for questions related to the formation, or answering of questions.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

2
votes
2answers
2k views

What do you do when you end the first part of a compound sentence with a quote? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How should I punctuate around quotes? For example, if I want to show someone's response in the same sentence, what would I do? Would the comma from the end of the quote be ...
0
votes
1answer
99 views

“Is/are X + adjective”

I provide the sentence in context: [A couple kisses. A friend of them sees the scene and says:] Oh, are you cute! This clearly means "you're so cute, sweet" and the like. So, is this ...
4
votes
5answers
490 views

how much more—question or statement?

Since this, how much more another[.|?] I would have used a question mark to end that sentence; however, I've seen two different, recent authors end it with a period. Is this type of sentence a ...
5
votes
1answer
14k views

Question tags — “did you” vs. “didn't you”

Typically, when we ask for confirmation/denial of a statement, we say something like the following: We turn left here, don't we? You have a cat, don't you? We've met before, haven't we? ...
1
vote
2answers
730 views

Which tense do I use when I talk about direct speech in texts?

I want to ask questions about a text. The text is written in past tense. When I talk about the text, do I only use simple present or also present progressive? Please, look at the following examples. ...
6
votes
3answers
535 views

Moving the interrogative pro-adverb to the end of a question

I am not a native speaker of English. From what I learn, 'wh' questions in English should normally be like this: Why should we believe you? How did she participate in the massacre? However, ...
-2
votes
2answers
9k views

Did vs. was in sentence [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why do we use 'did' with questions using the simple past tense? Do the following sentences have the same meaning? Did she say something? Was she said something? ...
7
votes
5answers
910 views

“Why can't I see?” or “Why I can't see?”?

Which of the following is correct? Why can't I see? Why I can't see? I am a bit confused, since both have inversion, negation and a "why" in the beginning.
-2
votes
1answer
708 views

What is the standard way to answer a question that is asking for confirmation? [closed]

Now, this is something all native english speakers should have learned in grade school, but many non-native english speakers don't know how to answer a question unambiguously. In particular, in the ...
1
vote
2answers
596 views

Why do we use “to” after “how”? [closed]

For example: How to makes this? Why do I use the to after how?
13
votes
6answers
9k views

Why do we put the verb to be at the end of these questions? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Changing subject and verb positions in statements and questions Look at the following questions - can anyone give a simple grammatical explanation as to why we put the verb ...
-3
votes
1answer
520 views

Greeting Question [closed]

We're working on a web/mobile application, and in our home screen we greet the user with the message Hi John, What are you up to today ?, we're offering him the option to find deals around him, places,...
4
votes
3answers
89k views

“What about you?” versus “How about you?”

E.g. I'm going straight home after work. How about you? I'm going straight home after work. What about you? They both seem to work interchangeably, but there feels like a subtle ...
-1
votes
2answers
660 views

Word order in questions

I would need to know whether the following is correct: What should be your best friend like? //what character should your best friend have What is his strange car for? //question I do not know ...
0
votes
1answer
511 views

Can I use “any” in this example?

I know "any" is used only in plural (questions or negation) or for uncountable nouns OR if it expresses "whichever"/"every. But what about this? Is there any document describing that? //can I use it? ...
4
votes
2answers
17k views

Rules for rising and falling intonation in similar questions - what are they?

Consider these two questions: Would you mind saying a little bit more about that? and What do you mean by that? When they perform the same function, and I expect an answer to both, why ...
2
votes
0answers
38 views

No and double inversion within question tags [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How to reply to question tags I'm a Dutch native speaker so forgive my English mistakes (that's why I am here). In Dutch it is normal to have a following example ...
8
votes
3answers
1k views

Why some questions are written in this funny way?

There, I did it myself. Instead of asking "Why are some questions written in this funny way?", I produced what strikes me as bad English ever so often: Questions that are formed by starting out with "...
1
vote
4answers
2k views

What is the appropriate question tag for sentences such as “Neither of you is…”?

Neither of you is going to the show tonight, ____? Should it be isn't he/she? I think the fact that neither of you takes the third-person singular verb is means that a third-person question tag ought ...
2
votes
0answers
67 views

“You went there?” in English [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is it OK to add a question mark to show inflection? Can we say in a conversation "You went there", and by stressing the statement, mean "Did you go?" I know one normally ...
0
votes
2answers
100 views

Could the order of words in the common question be changed? [closed]

Examples (somebody is thinking about some thoughts, said by the devil): Maybe he is right... Or isn't he? Maybe he is right... Or he isn't? Maybe he is right... Or even to doubt in his falsehood ...
3
votes
0answers
933 views

Interrogative form of a sentence [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How should I phrase a question that must be answered with an ordinal number (e.g., the third prime)? How to ask a question to get a cardinal number answer Neil ...
11
votes
5answers
3k views

'How to' vs 'How do I'

This question is inspired by comments on a question on stackoverflow. The original poster wrote: How to correct this error? And comments say that it's an incorrect question. Better is How ...
7
votes
2answers
2k views

Does appending a question mark to a declarative sentence result in a valid sentence?

Suppose I have the sentence: "All apples are green." Although it is not a true statement, clearly it is a declarative sentence. Can any declarative sentence like this be made into an ...
6
votes
3answers
14k views

Is “To whom could we direct our questions to?” grammatical?

Which of these sentences are proper? : If we have further questions with regards to x&y, to whom could we direct our questions? If we have further questions with regards to x&y, to whom ...
2
votes
2answers
244 views

What is this kind of question known as?

A question that's not exactly rhetorical but the answer IS implied. for example; "am I annoying you?" you're meant to say no, and they are aware that they are indeed annoying you.
2
votes
4answers
19k views

Difference between “can” and “may” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Can/May/Will you help me with this? Which is correct if I want to request for a pen? Can I have your pen please? May I have your pen please?
4
votes
0answers
178 views

“Aren't I” vs “Amn't I” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why “ain't I” and “aren't I” instead of “amn't I”? Why do we say "aren't I" rather than "amn't I"? Is it purely for ease or ...
4
votes
6answers
260 views

“Who is one to believe” or “which one to believe”

Do you think this edit was necessary? So, who is one to believe? (as in "So, who am i to believe?") into So, which one to believe? Specially considering that the following question in the original ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

“Difference between” multiple choices (vs. “among”) [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “between” vs “among” I learned that "between" refers to two objects or concepts and "among" refers to three or more. However, in situations when I ...
1
vote
3answers
2k views

What is another way of saying “how” in a question context? [closed]

For example, in the situation "How does a affect b?" I've come up with "In what way does a affect b?" and "What aspects of a make it affect b?" (although that has a slightly different connotation). ...
10
votes
1answer
8k views

Negative questions vs positive questions

I'd like to know if negative questions are used very often in English. For example, in Spanish, negative questions are used very often just to offer something, to ask about something you're not sure, ...
-2
votes
1answer
690 views

What's the best way to write a reported question? [closed]

Which of the following is correct: People ask me, what Google.com is? or People ask me, what is Google.com?
11
votes
5answers
17k views

Sentences ending with both a colon and a question mark

How should sentences that end with both a colon and a question mark be formed? Two examples are below, both questions, but one in which the colon presents a piece of information and the other in which ...
12
votes
0answers
399 views

How can I properly ask this question? [duplicate]

I want to ask a question so that I can get the answer which gives the position of the President. So the answer I want to get is: Barack Hussein Obama is the 44th President of the United States. ...
15
votes
2answers
5k views

Is it incorrect to say, “Why cannot…?”

At any point in history was "Why cannot...?" used as frequently as "Why can't...?" Is it even grammatically correct to say "Why cannot you do this?" I know it can be rearranged to be "Why can you not ...
34
votes
16answers
27k views

What's a word for avoiding a question with a generic (fake) answer?

Examples... Q: Why is the sky blue? A: Because God made it that way. (A kid to their parent) Q: Why do I have to clean my room? A: Because I said so. What is it called when someone ...
5
votes
2answers
4k views

“Are they American?” or “Are they Americans?”

What is the difference bewteen Are they American and Are they Americans?
2
votes
2answers
332 views

Is this correct grammar — “which feature in C/C++ don't you like?”

The question in question is this: Which feature in C/C++ don't you like? Just wanted to know if that is proper way of asking. Not sure if "don't you like" is the right way there.
7
votes
1answer
19k views

What is the correct punctuation when quoting a question in the middle of a larger sentence?

There are several questions here on quoting a question within a sentence, but most of them deal with the quote being at the end of the larger sentence. What if it's in the middle? In many cultures,...
5
votes
0answers
491 views

How to ask “nth time” of something [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Framing a question to which the answer is an ordinal number How should I phrase a question that must be answered with an ordinal number (e.g., the third prime)? If the ...
12
votes
4answers
31k views

“Haven't you?” or “don't you?”

What is the right question tag (in British English) when we use the verb have? I have interviewed a few native speakers and none of them could explain why sometimes they prefer "haven't/hasn't" and ...
2
votes
1answer
237 views

A single word for this type of question

What is a single word used to describe the following question in the following scenario: John comes in from the supermarket having not brought the jam and his brother says to him: 'Why didn't ...
0
votes
2answers
273 views

Words order in a question

Which is better (and why)? Which feature should I attach this task to? or To which feature should I attach this task?
7
votes
4answers
536 views

What's the term when you ask a question which implies a lie?

I remember there was a thread here on English.SE this month where someone explained this, but I can't remember how it was called. An example: Where have you stolen this product? This question ...
7
votes
8answers
9k views

What would you call a person who doesn't like questions being asked of them?

My sister says I ask too many questions, such as "What have you been up to lately?" She is the only person who says that. What do you call a person who doesn't like questions being asked?
5
votes
1answer
782 views

Punctuating a Sentence Containing a Question

If a sentence contains a complete question, but ends with a statement, should it be punctuated with a question mark? Example: Could she go to the store, he wondered
1
vote
3answers
31k views

“When did you born?” [closed]

When did you born? Can you please tell me which of the items below is the literal translation of the question? When did you give birth? When were you given birth to? Also, how do we answer to ...
0
votes
1answer
572 views

Is that a correct usage of present perfect?

What do you think about this sentence? Do you have bought the lesson book? Is that a correct usage of "Do you have bought"? Or should I say "Did you buy"?
4
votes
3answers
1k views

Are sentences that have multiple “WH Question” words considered grammatical?

Are sentences that have multiple "WH Question" words considered grammatical ? For example, is the following sentence grammatical: Tomorrow, where are we meeting at what time to do what ?