1
vote
3answers
101 views

How to write a question with a suggested answer at the end

How do you properly convey in writing a sentence where a question is asked and followed by a suggested answer? For example, the question "What are we having for dinner?" is asked, and the guess ...
1
vote
2answers
87 views

Place interrogation mark within question with “dashed”-comment

I'm trying to figure out where should I place an iterrogation mark in the sentence below. First, what I want to say: Does X mean X, or does it mean Y? As we talked before about X meaning Y. And ...
0
votes
2answers
149 views

Is a question mark used when trying to get someone's attention?

Mike: Hey, Matt? Matt: Yeah? Mike: What are you doing? Since it's not actually a question, I'm not sure if a question mark should be used or not. But I'm also not just saying 'hey' to ...
0
votes
1answer
81 views

How to punctuate a question within a thought [duplicate]

In a third person narrative, punctuate the following sentence: Wasn't art supposed to impact the reader in an emotional way, she wondered. How would that line be punctuated? I know I could use ...
0
votes
0answers
14 views

I am wondering: Is this a proper way to use a colon? [duplicate]

When sending sending formal emails that ask a question to the recipient, I often find myself writing something like the following: I was wondering if _____. The problem with this is that this ...
0
votes
2answers
103 views

What kind of punctuation should I use to embed a question in another sentence?

How should I punctuate this sentence? It seem that I should somehow distinguish the question part of the sentence from the main part of the sentence. If I didn't know the answer, I would first ...
1
vote
0answers
29 views

Exclaiming Questions [duplicate]

What is the correct way to write a question you would verbally ask in a higher tone of voice? How is this possible?! OR How is this possible!? The subtlety lies in the punctuation. Thanks ...
1
vote
1answer
173 views

How to puncutuate when using self imposed questions in a declarative sentence

I have toyed with using a colon and keeping the question marks or even ditching the question marks. See below: Admittedly I was apprehensive at first to approach the prisoner, all I could think ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Should I use a semicolon or a colon to introduce a question at the end of a sentence? [duplicate]

Which of the following is punctuated correctly? My question for you is: how do I do that? My question for you is; how do I do that? Or should it be something different altogether?
0
votes
1answer
391 views

What is the proper way to ask two questions in one sentence?

Every now and again I find myself writing a sentence like this: INPUT in LPINPUT is some data structure I can identify — what does LP mean, array? I don't know what to call this type of ...
1
vote
3answers
3k views

Can a semicolon be used to separate questions? [closed]

Did you see Survivor last night; it was crazy, right? Did you see Survivor last night? It was crazy, right? Can a semicolon separate questions? Which one is correct?
15
votes
3answers
3k views

How does one correctly punctuate a sentence that declares that one has a question? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Punctuation with “The question is…” '.', '?' or ' “… ?” ' Position of question mark when sentence doesn't end ...
4
votes
3answers
347 views

Punctuating a phrase leading up to a question

In formal writing (like a technical paper), is there a generally accepted way to punctuate the break between an introductory phrase and a question in a sentence like this? Let's ask ourselves ...
2
votes
2answers
713 views

What do you do when you end the first part of a compound sentence with a quote? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How should I punctuate around quotes? For example, if I want to show someone's response in the same sentence, what would I do? Would the comma from the end of the quote ...
4
votes
5answers
384 views

how much more—question or statement?

Since this, how much more another[.|?] I would have used a question mark to end that sentence; however, I've seen two different, recent authors end it with a period. Is this type of sentence a ...
6
votes
3answers
4k views

Sentences ending with both a colon and a question mark

How should sentences that end with both a colon and a question mark be formed? Two examples are below, both questions, but one in which the colon presents a piece of information and the other in which ...
6
votes
1answer
5k views

What is the correct punctuation when quoting a question in the middle of a larger sentence?

There are several questions here on quoting a question within a sentence, but most of them deal with the quote being at the end of the larger sentence. What if it's in the middle? In many ...
5
votes
1answer
504 views

Punctuating a Sentence Containing a Question

If a sentence contains a complete question, but ends with a statement, should it be punctuated with a question mark? Example: Could she go to the store, he wondered
4
votes
3answers
4k views

How do I punctuate a question within a statement?

What is the proper way to punctuate a question that is posed within a statement like in the following example? Associated with my interest in the patterns that structure aquatic ecosystems is the ...
10
votes
3answers
2k views

Quoting a question at the end of a sentence which is itself a question

If my sentence is a question and ends with a quote of a question, where exactly do I put a question mark? Did she ask, "Is it raining"? Did she ask, "Is it raining?"? Did she ask, "Is it ...
5
votes
5answers
4k views

When is it appropriate to end a question without a question mark?

Basically, if I ask a rhetorical question, it's not really prompting for an answer. Does that mean it should not end in a question mark? Here are two examples: "What's New" used as a title for a ...
9
votes
5answers
1k views

Is it OK to add a question mark to show inflection?

When asking a question you generally have to raise your voice at the end of the sentence, is it okay to stuff a question mark in order to show inflection? A couple examples: 'That really happened?' ...
6
votes
4answers
19k views

Does the word after a question mark start with a capital letter?

Should I write it like this? Or perhaps like this? Should I write it like this? or perhaps like this? What about after an exclamation mark or semicolon?
3
votes
5answers
4k views

What is the correct punctuation for an indirect question?

I'm wondering how it is correct to structure sentence and what punctuation should be used. In particular, is the next sentence correct: I was wondering if there's any progress on the issue. Or ...
2
votes
2answers
8k views

Punctuation with “The question is…” '.', '?' or ' “… ?” ' [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Position of question mark when sentence doesn't end with question Take this statement for example: That's not the question. The question is what was Colonel ...
2
votes
4answers
2k views

Punctuation around the word “OK” at the end of a sentence

If a sentence ends in "OK", and the sentence is a request, usually there is a comma before the OK and a question mark after it. The comma signifies a pause, correct? What if there was no pause, then ...
7
votes
7answers
12k views

Should “guess what” be a question or command?

In other words: should it be “Guess what?” or “Guess what!”? Or does the correct usage depend on the context and intent of the speaker?
8
votes
5answers
219 views

“How to […]?” and “Where to […]?” Questions that are not questions. Is this defensible?

Adding a question mark to the end of a "How to" or "Where to" sentence appears to be quite common. Here are two examples from this very site: How to punctuate a list of questions? (link) Where to ...
15
votes
5answers
28k views

What is the best way to punctuate a list of questions in a declarative sentence?

In my report a need to write a list of example questions that someone might ask, but I would like to do it in a sentence rather than a separate list. Here is an example: This poses questions such ...
3
votes
1answer
299 views

Is it correct to use “are you” instead of “if you're”?

As an example: This is a good read, are you interested in more related topics. What are these type of sentences called? Does it follow the same grammar as: Should you require more ...