1
vote
3answers
101 views

How to write a question with a suggested answer at the end

How do you properly convey in writing a sentence where a question is asked and followed by a suggested answer? For example, the question "What are we having for dinner?" is asked, and the guess ...
0
votes
0answers
22 views
-1
votes
4answers
97 views

convert this sentence to “not only but also” [closed]

The sheepdog did not allow the tigers to lay their paw on sheep and tied them in a daisy chain.
0
votes
2answers
1k views

“Have you got a chance to” vs “Did you get a chance to”

What is the difference between following two statements? Have you got a chance to look into this? Did you get a chance to look into this?
1
vote
4answers
273 views

“Where did you buy it?” or “where did you buy it from?”

When someone purchase something from somewhere and I ask him the location of purchasing, which one is the correct question: Where did you buy it? OR Where did you buy it from? Is ...
2
votes
3answers
270 views

“Was it a girl?” or “Was that a girl?”

Here's a conversation. "I saw a salesperson there" "Was it a girl?" Is it OK to use "it" when you refer to the salesperson? Or should you use "that" instead of "it"?
0
votes
2answers
124 views

Following a statement with a question

Person1: "I'm feeling quite rough today." Person2: "That sucks - what's the matter?" Is Person2 using correct punctuation, or should there be a comma to separate the statement and the question? ...
-1
votes
1answer
60 views

“I don't” or “don't I” in questions [closed]

Please tell me about the difference between these two questions: Why don't I see it? Why I don't see it? Is the second question grammatically correct?
0
votes
1answer
173 views

Using Who versus that in a sentence

In this sentence: We are asking you to invite your congregation that have a passion for mission to consider volunteering three hours one day a week. Should it read "who" or "that" after ...
2
votes
2answers
143 views

“With what […]?” or “What […] with?”

Making a comparison with Who/Whom I now have a doubt about the use of what with prepositions in questions. I'll explain by example: These two sentences are correct, one is more formal than the other: ...
2
votes
1answer
287 views

Is a question an independent clause?

Ex. Anyone going to the store? Often times in writing words get omitted in questions, such as the one above. Does that still make them "independent clauses" or must the sentence be able to stand as ...
1
vote
3answers
226 views

The Drop - meaning of “get to” [closed]

What does "get to" mean in the following excerpt taken from the book "The Drop" by Michael Connelly? The "Get to" is at the end of the excerpt. I have written it in bold. Thank you very much for the ...
2
votes
1answer
604 views

A question ending with preposition “of” [duplicate]

I would like to know whether this is correct: He uses a car instead of a bus. What does he use a car instead of?
2
votes
1answer
345 views

What are “How to … ?” questions (errors) called?

I see questions formed like "How to do this?" every day. They are so frequent that I wonder if there is a name for grammatical errors of this kind.
-2
votes
3answers
277 views

“What keeps him going?” vs. “What does him keep going?” [duplicate]

Why is the grammatical structure of "What keeps him going?" right? I got a bit confused over this, when I realized that this structure fundamentally contradicts the basic rule I teach my students: ...
1
vote
1answer
204 views

Using can and can't [duplicate]

She can barely cook a decent meal, ____ she? I think the answer is can’t. Please advise: what is the rule here? Therefore, if the question is asked: She can’t swim, ____ she? In this case, ...
2
votes
2answers
182 views

“What questions are there?” vs. “What are the questions there?”

Imagine this scene: "a non-native student asking another student about the questions in a paper on the table of the teacher". Which is the correct way for asking this between the two questions below: ...
-1
votes
2answers
86 views

Post Question To

If Craig wrote a question on an online forum and the question was intended for Larry: Craig posted a question to Larry. Should the part "to Larry" modify "a question", or "posted"? In ...
7
votes
3answers
1k views

When to use nah or right in a sentence

When I was chatting with my friend, as a part of our conversation I used a phrase. "You have laptop nah." He replied, first try to change your English, it sounds ridiculous, using words nah, right. ...
1
vote
0answers
21 views

Interrogative sentences without auxiliary verbs and declarative sentences with auxiliary verbs [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is it OK to add a question mark to show inflection? Sometimes, auxiliary verbs or helping verbs are not present in some interrogative sentences in some specific contexts ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

“You have nothing to do” - “Yes I do” / “Yes I don't” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When a negative question is asked, what is the grammatically correct way to answer? How to answer a negative question without ambiguity? If someone says "You have ...
0
votes
0answers
59 views

How can I answer back? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How to answer a negative question without ambiguity? If someone ask you this question "Don't you have exam? " how can I answer back using only (Yes and No). that's ...
4
votes
8answers
1k views

“Why do people read books?” — “Because people read books to get information.”

I work at a middle school in South Korea. One of the questions on the recent 2nd grade mid-term exam was "Why do people read books?". There are over 300 students in this year, so there were plenty ...
5
votes
1answer
1k views

Question about “how many”

Why don't we use the auxiliary do in the following question: How many people study there?
6
votes
3answers
344 views

Moving the interrogative pro-adverb to the end of a question

I am not a native speaker of English. From what I learn, 'wh' questions in English should normally be like this: Why should we believe you? How did she participate in the massacre? However, ...
12
votes
6answers
3k views

Why do we put the verb to be at the end of these questions? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Changing subject and verb positions in statements and questions Look at the following questions - can anyone give a simple grammatical explanation as to why we put the ...
7
votes
3answers
777 views

Why some questions are written in this funny way?

There, I did it myself. Instead of asking "Why are some questions written in this funny way?", I produced what strikes me as bad English ever so often: Questions that are formed by starting out with ...
2
votes
0answers
61 views

“You went there?” in English [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is it OK to add a question mark to show inflection? Can we say in a conversation "You went there", and by stressing the statement, mean "Did you go?" I know one ...
8
votes
5answers
672 views

'How to' vs 'How do I'

This question is inspired by comments on a question on stackoverflow. The original poster wrote: How to correct this error? And comments say that it's an incorrect question. Better is How ...
1
vote
2answers
3k views

How to ask questions with “how many” in them?

I would like some guidance on how to ask questions with "how many" in them. For example, does one say From how many minutes is the train late? or simply How many minutes is the train late? ...
4
votes
3answers
1k views

Why do we invert word order when asking a question?

What's the difference between an inverted question and a normal-order question? Why invert? Is there a reason or a benefit? I love you? Do I love you?
5
votes
3answers
2k views

Changing subject and verb positions in statements and questions

We always change subject and verb positions in whenever we want to ask a question such as "What is your name?". But when it comes to statements like the following, which form is correct? I ...