This tag is for questions related to the formation, or answering of questions.

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-3
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1answer
65 views

Are the following old English examples grammatically correct? [closed]

I have a question about two sentences I use. I would like to know if they are grammatically correct. I'm not particularly interested in hearing that they are old fashioned, out of date, or awkard. ...
3
votes
4answers
171 views

Why do not we ask negative questions without a contraction on the not after the verb?

I have found multiple questions touching on this but not a single one that has a comprehensive answer. The information is all there but in little bits. "Do you not" vs. "Don't ...
0
votes
0answers
22 views

have your boyfriend or has your boyfriend [closed]

Formally, is it correct to write? have your boyfriend ever meet your parents? or: has your boyfriend ever meet your parents?
-1
votes
0answers
11 views

Why must I have reputation points to let my opinion be known? [migrated]

Your requirements for "reputation points" to allow one to comment, or to vote up or down on any topic is authoritarian and dictatorial, and smacks of totalitarianism. I'm just sayin' :)
0
votes
0answers
15 views

Use of “How To …?” in Headings [duplicate]

I often see non-native English speakers write questions and use them as headings. The questions are usually of the form interrogative word followed by the content of the question followed by a ...
0
votes
0answers
11 views

The etymology of do/does for questions [duplicate]

What is the etymology of the use of do/ does/ did for questions forms as opposed to inverting the subject and verb?
1
vote
2answers
100 views

What we call the next consecutive question in series of problem

on stack overflow we can edit the questions and this problem is based on that. Scenario I was asking problem A and got the solution of A but face a new problem B. How do I mention (reference ...
1
vote
1answer
53 views

Can you play ON it? [closed]

I have a question. Is it correct to ask "Can you play ON it?"? The word "it " means an instrument. So if I ask "can you play it? ", will this question mean the same as "Can you play the guitar?"?
2
votes
1answer
53 views

Rhetorical device - listing rejected answers

Is there a name for the rhetorical device whereby you ask a question and then list the rejected answers? For example: "What was it then? It wasn't x, nor y, nor z. No, in fact it was . . .." The ...
1
vote
2answers
47 views

did you know …? [duplicate]

Should I use an interrogation mark in the following examples? Did you know that…? ...in Finland, there is only 1 mandatory test, PISA, taken when children are 16 ? ...in Brazil an ...
2
votes
2answers
60 views

Word order in question with very long subject

The normal word order for a wh- question in English is: wh- + auxiliary + subject + verb. Hence the sentence below should be correct: What might the consequences of the loss of diversity of plant ...
0
votes
0answers
17 views

'do' or 'does': “do/does money and power control the world?” [duplicate]

Can you please help me with the correct form of this question?
2
votes
1answer
46 views

“How much X is in Y?” vs “How much X is there in Y?”

First: How much money is there in a bank? Second: How much money is in a bank? Honestly, both of them are the same for me, but who knows.. I am not a native speaker.
2
votes
6answers
263 views

What is the question for “twice as many … as” format?

I have a question about how to make a certain type of question. There is the statement here: The airplane has twice as many engines as it requires. I want to make a question the answer to ...
1
vote
1answer
49 views

Punctuation for referring to a question

Are either of these incorrect or nonstandard ways to refer to a question mid sentence? Or are both of them okay? Our experiment set out to answer the question; is running fruit under water an ...
0
votes
2answers
51 views

“I'm sure this would not have happen” vs. “I'm not sure this didn't happen”

I was asked what's wrong with this sentence: I'm not sure this didn't happen. I didn't think it was incorrect, but my friend said I was. So, is the sentence correct either way, or is one correct and ...
0
votes
1answer
23 views

does a semicolon or comma belong before “is this correct?”

You went to the store and bought chips, is that correct? You went to the store and bought chips; is that correct? You bought a bag of chips, correct? You bought a bag of chips; correct? Thanks for ...
0
votes
2answers
67 views

“Is it for when?” vs. “When is it for?”

I always get confused which of the following is correct: Is it for when? When is it for? Or are there further ways to ask for when something is needed. The it in question is an ...
1
vote
4answers
258 views

Reported speech - questions

In the Cambridge Grammar of the English Language; Huddleston and Pullum 2002, they make the following qualifying comment: ... reported speech covers the reporting of spoken and written text but ...
0
votes
2answers
115 views

Is it correct to ask “ What degrees is it outside?” [closed]

My friend keeps saying that asking "What degrees is it outside?" is not correct, is she right?
2
votes
1answer
47 views

What does “So you are going to be famous ?!” express? [closed]

My teacher gave us a dialogue the other day and the boy said he was playing in a band so his friend said : Oh, that must be exciting! So you are going to be famous ? Then she gave us a question : What ...
1
vote
0answers
25 views

“Which foods do you…” vs. “What foods do you…” [duplicate]

The word "which", by its definition, is "asking for information specifying one or more people or things from a definite set." So, naturally, "which foods do you..." is the correct way of phrasing this ...
6
votes
5answers
226 views

Why is the word “how” considered an adverb, even if the answer is an adjective?

Consider this question and its related answer: Question: How was the pizza? Answer: It was delicious. The question is asking how, which is defined in every dictionary as an ...
4
votes
3answers
185 views

How to categorize this phrase. Relative clause, Interrogative clause, Adverbial clause?

What is "Where to go" in the sentence "Where to go is the question." Is it a adverbial phrase or a relative clause? And what is "Why go" in the sentence "Why go when you can stay?" - is it a clause?
2
votes
1answer
56 views

“What X is this?” vs. “What's this X?”

What's the difference between "What color is this?" and "What's this color?". If someone is asking a kid, which one is more appropriate? Should he use "Which" instead of "What"?
2
votes
1answer
72 views

How to phrase a question to know a person's current number in a particular position?

I'm trying to figure out how to phrase a question to know a person's current number in a position. For example: Mr. X is the 15th prime minister of India. What is the correct question to ask ...
1
vote
2answers
96 views

“Why does he not?” or “Why does not he?” and why? [duplicate]

Which is the more correct form: Why does he not? Why does not he? and why? At first blush 1 would seem to be grammatical - just on an intuitive judgement. However 2 logically seems as ...
1
vote
2answers
44 views

Another way to say “ Having recieved no response” [closed]

Please suggest other ways to phrase" Having received no response."
0
votes
1answer
69 views

Correct question form with “supposed to”? [closed]

I am wondering is following question correct: Is it what was supposed to be done here? Thanks in advance.
1
vote
1answer
69 views

Do these questions have the same meaning? [closed]

Didn't you come here last week? and Did you come here last week, didn't you?
4
votes
4answers
831 views

Why do some questions not start with an auxiliary verb?

When I learned English, my teachers told me that all questions must have an auxiliary verb at the beginning, just like Are you mad? or Is she playing? do. But when watching some movies or talking ...
0
votes
0answers
45 views

Way to ask interviewer (/speaking examiner) to repeat slowly its question [duplicate]

The accent of a speaking examiner is sometimes difficult to understand completely. Asking him to repeat his question is a delicate action that should be handled correctly, in my consideration. ...
1
vote
2answers
78 views

Cooperation, how to use it in a question?

Is it correct to say: Would you like to start a cooperation (with us)? Or should it be: Would you like to cooperate (with us)? I feel like the first sentence is wrong, as it sounds to much like ...
4
votes
2answers
83 views

How do I punctuate a question with a guessed answer in it?

How to punctuate a question directly followed by the asker's guess at the answer? E.g. What's in here? Your books? What's in here, your books? What's in here; your books? Which of ...
0
votes
1answer
329 views

“Are you hurt” vs. “Did you get hurt”

What should we use when someone is injured? Are you hurt? Or it should be Did you get hurt? I felt using the second one as improper. Please correct me.
0
votes
2answers
107 views

Is there difference in common usage between 'I have an answer' and 'I know an answer' sentences

In common everyday usage is there any diffrence between these sentences: 'I have an answer' and 'I know an answer' My clue: Ad 1. I have some proposition of an answer but I'm not 100% sure Ad 2. ...
0
votes
1answer
91 views

What is the origin of “Why don't you…” as a suggestion or command?

Frequently, in spoken dialogue one hears the above phrase used as a suggestion to the listener (or sometimes more strongly, as a command): Why don't you give me that book? Why don't you go to the ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

Is there a word for 'religism'? [duplicate]

I'm searching for a word with a meaning similar to Racism or Sexism but within the context of religion. Is there a word for this meaning?
3
votes
4answers
137 views

Can I say “Which area of triangle a or triangle b is larger”?

I am a math teacher in Asia. In one math question there are two triangles, A and B. I want to ask which has the larger area. Should I ask: "Which area of triangle a or triangle b is larger"? or ...
0
votes
1answer
51 views

Are these default questions about events correct grammatically? [closed]

As you can see below, I created some default questions which are supposed to ask about events that either have happened or will happen in future(the gaps will be filled by different events such as ...
0
votes
1answer
103 views

Inversion in Wh-questions [duplicate]

What is difference between: Why I am studying? Why am I studying?
0
votes
0answers
48 views

How do you ask this? [duplicate]

"Abraham Lincoln was the 16th President of USA" How do I ask a question that gets me this answer ? I want a direct question - not something like "How many presidents before Lincoln" (I mean, without ...
4
votes
4answers
255 views

Use of 'not' in questions

When is it okay to use 'not' when posing a question? I believe that the person asking would include the 'not 'when he believes the implied to be true. For example: "Are you going to the store? "Are ...
1
vote
3answers
87 views

If X was not part Y, I'd like it - meaning

I'm trying to fill out a survey that asks me about features that should or should not be included in a smartphone app. The actual questions are confidential, but it's in the style of a sentence like ...
0
votes
2answers
231 views

Can we use “you” to refer to a general person? [duplicate]

I asked a friend of mine "Does he use workout machines that tone your ass?" I know it's more clear if I had said "Does he use workout machines that tone his ass?", but is the first question still ...
0
votes
1answer
124 views

Asking a “Do you have…” question without do-support

Is the following sentence correct English? Have you the address? The address in question is obvious to the person being asked. It's normal to ask such a question as "Do you have the address?" ...
0
votes
2answers
49 views

is 'do we actually know where we are going any more' a question?

I'm confused as to if do we actually know where we are going any more is a question or not, because of the 'do' I think yes but when read it seems like a sentence.
0
votes
2answers
135 views

What type of question is “He's right behind me, isn't he?”

This sort of question He's right behind me, isn't he? is popular on comedy TV shows. It's usually said by somebody just after they've been poking fun or talking badly about someone to group of other ...
1
vote
0answers
28 views

Is there a way to ask the ordinal number value in English without sounding weird? [duplicate]

If the answer expected is It is an amazing car, then the question would be How is the car? If the answer expected is I got my red car then the question would be something like Which colour car did ...
1
vote
1answer
79 views

Punctuation for a compound question

What is the proper punctuation for the following? Have you heard, I like chocolate ice cream (?) (.) Should it be two separate sentences? Have you heard? I like chocolate ice cream. Is there a ...