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1
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4answers
48 views

How to correctly quantify the term “research”

What is the correct way to express the quantity of research. Eg: Joe has done a lot of research on the subject. Is there a better way to express "a lot". Thank you
0
votes
0answers
44 views

Why is “all . . . not” apparently more common than “not all ”?

For example, All that glitters is not gold is sort of a fixed term, and people often use the same “all . . . not” form when talking about things. See also the question “Is it wrong to use ‘not’ in ...
-1
votes
1answer
39 views

Do we use “the amount of” or “the number of” for mixed plural and singular nouns?

"the number of" precedes plural countable nouns, as in: "The number of paper products..." "the amount of" precedes non-count nouns, as in: "The amount of oil..." How if we want to ...
0
votes
0answers
44 views

How many kinds are one? [duplicate]

Is "kind", as a noun, singular, or plural? People nearly always say "these/those kind of (things)" rather than "this/that kind of (things)" makes more sense.
1
vote
2answers
70 views

Quantifiers “most” vs. “most of”

I came across this exercise in one of Oxford books. Most / Most of flowers bought at airports are safe, about 90%. Shouldn't we use "most of the" when we are talking about a specific set of ...
-1
votes
2answers
368 views

such as something vs. such something as

The original one: From the view point of outstanding teachers such as John... From the view point of such outstanding teachers as John ... From the view point of outstanding teachers such John as... ...
2
votes
2answers
371 views

Optional 'of' in various phrases, especially with 'much/much of'

Yes, I know there is a related question here. But that doesn't answer my question. For each of the following phrases, are they correct? If not, why not? What is the OF doing? What part of speech ...
2
votes
3answers
426 views

Why do we say “so much more” rather than “so more ”? Why do we have to put the much in?

If the definition of the word so is an extent, then why do we have to put another word that describes a quantity after it, as "so much more" or "so much better"? Why can't we just say, so more or so ...
-1
votes
1answer
51 views

Which is correct and why [closed]

You work (too hard/ too much hard). I have (quite a lot of free time/ quite free time).
1
vote
3answers
2k views

What is the formal way to say “a bit”?

What is the formal way to say a bit in an essay, for example, in the sentence beginning “It is a bit different from”? Is a little formal enough?
4
votes
3answers
1k views

Is 'many' used in positive sentences or not?

It is uncanny how many books will insist that neither 'many' nor 'much' can be used in positive sentences. Have you got many pens? / Have you got much money? --> correct I haven't got many pens. / I ...
2
votes
4answers
444 views

Quantification of Frequency Adverbs

This is a list of common frequency adverbs in English with rough estimates of their absolute frequency someone has posted on an ESL study site: Always (100% of the time) Frequently (about 90% of ...
2
votes
3answers
313 views

Plural indefinite pronouns?

Can some indefinite pronouns be plural? One commenter on Mr K's Grammar World says they cannot. He also says the following examples contain quantifiers, and not indefinite pronouns. Many have ...
0
votes
2answers
141 views

How multiple quantifiers in a sentence are interpreted

Someone sleeps everyday. Does this mean that there is someone who sleeps everyday or that everyday someone sleeps?
0
votes
1answer
47 views

Am I using “such” right? [closed]

Are these right? such amounts of money such a lot of money such an amount of money such lots such lots of people
1
vote
2answers
118 views

Universal quantifiers

In the following statements all the individuals of a group are addressed for gratitude: Gratitude is owed to each member of the group. Gratitude is owed to every member of the group. Gratitude is ...
0
votes
5answers
3k views

Difference between “plenty of money/friends” and “a lot of money/friends”?

What is the difference between: I have plenty of money/friends. I have a lot of money/friends.
2
votes
1answer
274 views

“For all” or “for each”

In mathematical context, or in the context of mathematical logic, is there a difference between: This is valid for each x. and This is valid for all x. ? If both have the same meaning, ...
0
votes
2answers
3k views

Potato or Potatoes

When considering a recipe which contains potatoes, which would be correct for the UK: 350g of potato 350g of potatoes
0
votes
5answers
431 views

Order of universal and existential quantifier

In mathematics we use the universal and existential quantifiers (represented symbolically by ∀ and ∃, respectively) to make our lives easier. We can also use them in English. From a logical ...
5
votes
2answers
269 views

“both of” + possessive, which noun does “both of” refer to?

Both of the boy's parents were happy with the new school. Is it proper English to say "both of the boy's parents", as in the above sentence, to mean "both parents of the boy"? Or do we have to ...
3
votes
2answers
97 views

“length in bytes” vs “length by the byte” and “paid in hours” vs “paid by the hour”

"The variable len indicates the buffer length in bytes." "The variable len indicates the buffer length by the byte." I'm a computer programmer, so I know 1 is far more common than 2. ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

Is “make no mistake” a mistake?

Is "make no mistake" proper grammar? Isn't "no" being used as a quantifier? Aren't quantified nouns supposed to be plural when the quantity is none? For example, I was taught to say, "one egg" and ...
2
votes
2answers
113 views

Is “any” correctly applied in the example?

I suppose in this sentence "any" means "all" and/or "every" reference occured in DEF_2 and DEF_3. One shall remove any reference to those items in DEF_2 and DEF_3. Is this correct?
35
votes
9answers
5k views

“1 in 10 are” or “1 in 10 is”?

Take the examples: "One in ten children are dyslexic." "One in ten children is dyslexic." "One in ten children has dyslexia." "One in ten children have dyslexia." The "one" is singular so 2 and 3 ...
4
votes
3answers
612 views

“Amount of boxes” vs “number of boxes” in non discrete graph

I have a graph where I show number of boxes that a machine can service per minute. The data may not always give a whole number (for example, a machine may be able to service 2.3 boxes / per minute). ...
18
votes
3answers
18k views

“Amount” vs. “number” vs. “quantity”

For what values of x does one write the number of x, the amount of x, or the quantity of x?