Pun is a play on words or paronomasia.

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1answer
77 views

Pun with “effervescent” and “fiddlesticks”

I read a pun in a children's joke book "Effervescent enough covers on your bed, your fiddlestick out." I know that "fiddlestick out" is "feet will stick out", but what is the "effervescent" punning ...
5
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1answer
226 views

Is there a technical name for this kind of wordplay?

In his book Humorous English, Evan Esar writes, The blended compound is the fusion of two compounds, with the terminal word of one being the same or similar to the initial word of the other. By ...
5
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1answer
445 views

What makes 'St-n-c-tt-r' a 'smirking pun'?

This passage comes from Walter Isaacson's “Benjamin Franklin: An American Life.”: Franklin wrote about a husband who caught his wife in bed with a man named Stonecutter, tried to cut off the ...
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2answers
103 views

When Harry met Sally - idiomatic expression

In the 1989 movie "When Harry met Sally" the expression: When X met Y Has some other meaning other than the obvious one, or there's a hidden idiomatic expression or a pun?
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2answers
138 views

“Bnag” pun, anagram or play on words?

There is a one-liner by Tim Vine, a British stand-up comedian, that sees him pull out a card with the word... BNAG and exclaim: That's bang out of order! The joke is derived from the idiom ...
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2answers
158 views

Is the second last “shipping” necessary?

From this question, This is a ship-shipping ship, shipping shipping ships. The second to last shipping seems to be redundant. Is it necessary? Does the sentence still preserve the same ...
0
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2answers
96 views

The “preying” mantis female is said to devour its “mail” during copulation. Considering these mistakes unintentional, what would we call them?

Is there such thing as "a written malapropism" or "a slip of the pen"? Or are they just simple spelling mistakes? If they were unintentional, they couldn't be considered puns or a play with words, I ...
3
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1answer
94 views

What literary term best describes the following phrase relying on the dual meaning of a word for humorous effect?

"A sheep led astray rarely gets fleeced." The literal act of fleecing of a sheep alludes to the alternative meaning of fleeced - to get swindled, or stripped of money. It doesn't seem to be a pun, ...
14
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1answer
989 views

“Foot pound energy Irish appearing” pun?

In translating W. H. Hodgson's The Regeneration of Captain Bully Keller, I came across this sentence, which I suppose must be some kind of pun or joke, but I cannot understand at all. He knew ...
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3answers
68 views

Word for “extinct”, “eradicated” that sounds like “reserved” [closed]

In the Czech language, there's a word play with copyright notice. We say "vyhrazena" for "reserved" (as of rights) and "vyhlazena" as for eradicated (eg. Indians). I used that pun on my mini site ...
67
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3answers
11k views

Two crows being an attempted murder

What is the point of this joke? — "What do you call two crows on a branch?" — "Attempted murder." I've googled it to check if it was a word play but the closest one I've hit was "marauder". ...
1
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1answer
160 views

Informal Vocabulary - 'Mank you'

I understand the character is being sarcastic but I don't understand why exactly he says 'mank you'. I looked up the word 'mank' and it doesn't make sense in the context so I suppose 'mank you' is ...
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3answers
594 views

What English homophone corresponds to 'oise salon'?

This is something of a fringe question. I hope it's considered on-topic. There have been two books published which purport to be French poetry. The joke is that when read aloud, the poetry sounds, ...
0
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2answers
213 views

Origin of “Arachnoleptic fit”

In various websites on the Internet, including http://www.joke-archives.com/dictionaries/dictionarywords.html, I've come across the phrase Arachnoleptic fit. Apparently all the words in that set ...
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1answer
125 views

Name of wordplay similar to a pun but where one word is made up

An example would be most clear: Let's say a company finds a new way to help people communicate. They call their company kamunik8r Since kamunik8r is a made up word that is meant to sound like ...
3
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1answer
359 views

“The man was either mad or both”

In the delightful Fry and Laurie sketch The Letter, several puns are expertly delivered by Stephen Fry, however there is one I don't understand. At 4:45 in the video, he says "The man was either mad, ...
4
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1answer
394 views

“Do You Dreams Come True”: A clever pun or just bad English?

There's a Japanese band called "Dreams Come True", and on March 21st (2009) they released an album entitled: "Do You Dreams Come True". The title of the album has troubled me since this time. src: ...
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2answers
264 views

Can Someone Tell me if This Sentence is a Pun?

My friend and I are walking along a nude beach. There is an exposed man directly in front of us. My friend asks me what time it is. My response is "It's 12 o'cock." Pun or bad joke?
108
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3answers
29k views

I don't get this joke. Is it some kind of play on “water, too?”

I don't get this joke. Is it some kind of play on "water, too?" Transcript: Two scientists walk into a bar. The first says, "I'll have some H2O." The second says, "I'll have a glass of water ...
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2answers
19k views

What do you call two words that contradict each other in a sentence?

I'm having trouble as to what you call two words that contradict each other. For example, "That was weirdly normal." I think this kind of word play is used in puns and jokes. But I do not know how you ...
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3answers
303 views

Can you explain the pun “erpigarms”

Here is an extract from a short story: When Pushkin broke his legs, he started to go about on wheels. His friends used to enjoy teasing Pushkin and grabbing him by his wheels. Pushkin took this ...
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1answer
1k views

What is the earliest recorded pun in the English language?

So, I'll admit I love a good pun. Done correctly, it is humor for the clever that builds up rather than tears down. Plus, it beats an emetic in the right situation. That said, I wonder how far back ...
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1answer
461 views

I can't make heads or tails of this paragraph. It's a complex pun. (Warning: mildly “bad language” and urban lingo.)

Here it is: It's your brother's MR. T PUPPET, which of course is kept in the apartment with a sense of profound humorous irony. But as usual with your BRO's exploits, this is no ordinary irony, or ...
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3answers
70k views

How to use “no pun intended”?

The phrase "no pun intended" is often added after someone made a pun or something that could be considered a pun. If this should be taken literally (i.e. it really was unintentional), then I'm not ...
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3answers
4k views

Make like a banana

In my area, it's not unusual to hear expressions like I'm going to make like a banana and split. ...make like a tree and leave. ...make like a baby and head out. ...make like a prom ...
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0answers
745 views

Shakespeare: “Asses are made to bear” [closed]

When Petruchio invites Katherine to sit on his lap, she replies, "Asses are made to bear, and so are you." (Taming of the Shrew Act II, Scene 1.) The denotation is clear, donkeys (Equus africanus ...
3
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3answers
407 views

What is the best way to idiomatically translate this pun into English?

I'm trying to translate some text from Russian to English. The text discusses both chairs and power over people (it is a fantasy work discussing a Chair of Power for a Lord). At one point, it has a ...
15
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1answer
2k views

“Soft-peddle” vs. “Soft-pedal”: eggcorn blunder or sly play on words?

In chat the other day I asked the following question: "Recently I've been seeing writers using "soft-peddle" in print (in reputable publications, to boot) when I am certain the trope is ...
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3answers
851 views

What is the correct term for this juxtaposition of words?

He has a soft spot for playing hard ball Not really a pun, I think. What is the exact term? And correct me if the title can be made better.
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4answers
868 views

Literal antonym to “Outspoken”

I'm working on a humorous project in which one character is called the Outspoken Mime. The adjective "outspoken" means the mime in question is "free, bold, or unreserved in speech." On one side, ...
5
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1answer
920 views

Brainstorm: a pun on rainstorm?

The Online Etymology Dictionary unsurprisingly says brainstorm is from the combination of brain and storm. What I want to know is whether or not this neologism was an intentional pun on the word ...
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2answers
2k views

A pun or not a pun?

I was talking to someone about puns and she said that it's a play on words, e.g. "those two pears are a pear of green balls" (sorry about the awful example, I couldn't think of any others on the ...
8
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1answer
2k views

“After all 7 8 9” joke?

I know that it is very important to be aware of "hidden meanings" of words and phrases. (Especially if the meaning is sexual.) That is why I love Stephen Colbert's "The Word" segments and usually ...
3
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2answers
1k views

“We've got you covered” on an umbrella

Is the above a pun? In one sense, the word covered is used to different ways (sort of) in that the phrase is usually used to mean a covered responsibility, not literally covered. At the same time, ...
2
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3answers
2k views

What is the meaning, or fun of the pun in the line, “H.D. was the youthful butt of excruciating jokes, or eggscruciating yolks”?

I came across the line, “In the orphanage he shared with Puss, H.D. was the youthful butt of excruciating jokes (or eggscruciating yolks).” in Time magazine’s review of the newly released animation, ...
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3answers
8k views

A word for when a word is used incorrectly (grammatically) but can still be parsed in a grammatically correct way?

Does such a word exist? An example: Do good. Supposing that my intention in saying "Do good!" was actually "Do well (on your test)!", the sentence still parses correctly as "Do good (deeds)!" I ...
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5answers
707 views

A pedant's plea for a proper pun

This problem has plagued me occasionally, and I'm finally asking: What is the proper grammar (specifically, verb use and capitalization) in the following pun situation? The only Windows I want to ...
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6answers
6k views

“Tortoise” and “taught us”

I’m reading Alice in Wonderland, and found the following dialogue: “The master was an old Turtle — we used to call him Tortoise—” “Why did you call him Tortoise, if he wasn’t one?” Alice ...
4
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1answer
480 views

Term for misspelling used as pun of another word

What is the term for a common or potential pun of another word using a misspelling? For example, I thought the made-up word bikery was a funny sort of play on the word bakery. What, therefore, would ...
23
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1answer
3k views

Explain this pickup line: “If Bangkok invaded Djibouti, would Greece help?”

I was at an Model UN conference and often notes like the following get passed. As I'm not a native speaker, I assume that this has to do with some pronunciational issue. Can you please explain what's ...
4
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2answers
1k views

Double meaning?

Taken from "A Quiver Full of Arrows": "The flowers have lasted well," she teased, and left him to make the coffee. Does the sentence clearly imply that she left to make the coffee? Or could ...
5
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3answers
921 views

Is this sentence grammatically correct or punny (or both)?

I have a comment on this question where I refer to a list of three examples deemed 'valid'. I said: "I think the last valid example is not." The sentence sounds kind of strange (I did that on ...
6
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1answer
259 views

Jackson = $$son: pun or topical reference

Alfred Bester's short story The Demolished Man (the original version serialized in Galaxy magazine in 1952, not the novel published in 1963) may have been the first instance of SMS-speak, featuring ...