A proper noun or proper name is a capitalized noun representing a unique entity as opposed to a common noun, which represents a class of entities or nonunique instances of that class.

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Choice of relative pronouns: 'who' and/or 'that' for people?

Albert Einstein is a German-born theoretical physicist. He became world-famous for his general theory of relativity. If you turn these two sentences into one, a main clause + a relative clause, you ...
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Use of caps for zip code

I would like to know which of "ZIP Code" or "ZIP code" is correct. One of our contributors has alerted me to the fact that the term is a registered name owned by the US Postal Service, but, to my ...
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298 views

Grammaticality of “the” in “I am going to the Asda later”

A friend of mine and I are having a long standing debate about the correctness of a sentence. Informing me what he was doing later that day he said: I am going to the Asda later. Note: To ...
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Why does English use definite articles before certain proper nouns, such as the names of ships?

Over on English Language Learners, a non-native speaker asked a question about adding "the" before movie titles. I wanted to tell him or her that the rule in English is not to add a definite article ...
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30 views

Should “popperians” be capitalized?

Popperians being people who are sympathetic with Karl Popper's views? In general, should groups of people who take their collective name from a proper noun in turn capitalize their name?
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534 views

Subject/verb agreement when a title ends in a plural

1) "The book 'The Three Musketeers' is a wonderful example of..." Here we have a proper noun, a title that happens to end in a plural, and I have no sense that the verb should be plural. ...
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211 views

Abstract noun as a proper name?

This might be silly to ask, and possibly more theoretical than anything else, but it's something I've always pondered. My first name is Hope. When I was in Elementary School and first learned about ...
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99 views

What is the best way to refer in English to a zoo all whose animals are carved in stone?

I of course don't have English as my primary language, so have some forgiveness. I would translate the name as "The Rock Zoo" (doesn't seem to make it) "The Zoo on Rock" (better) "The Zoo on Stone" ...
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67 views

Treat Hypothetical Entities as Proper Nouns?

I am working with mathematical papers and commonly encounter situations where the author designates hypothetical entities. For example: We assume that player 1 moves first. Should references to ...
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2k views

How should “Northern Europe” be capitalized?

Europe should obviously be capitalized, since it is a proper noun. Should the northern part of the example sentence "I was traveling through northern Europe." be capitalized? In country names such as ...
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Quotation marks in names of events

I'm not sure if I should leave out quotation marks in names of events. Should it be: Choir competitions “Legnica Cantat”, “Canti Veris Praga”, “IFAS Pardubice”, “Advent and Christmas Music Festival ...
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169 views

Proper noun capitalization. Language or Culture?

I've noticed over the years my perception of "correct capitalization of proper nouns" has been challenged, as I've interacted with more cultures and languages. For example: Days of the week, in ...
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44 views

Does the properness of 'Street' (in the name of a street) survive when discussing two particular streets together?

So do Smith St and Wesson St meet: "at the corner of Smith & Wesson Streets"; or "at the corner of Smith & Wesson streets"?
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What is the correct capitalization of the words earth and moon?

I believe that Earth means planet and earth means soil. But I've seen earth used in published works to mean the planet earth. But no one writes jupiter. Similarly, Moon should mean the name of ...
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215 views

Is 'major' in a musical context a noun or an adjective?

In the question What are the notes in the D major scale?, I'm trying to work out what type of word major is. A scale just means a sequence of notes with defined intervals between them, and these ...
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822 views

When did we stop translating proper names?

It used to be that one would just translate a proper name that was in another language into English when referring to that entity. For example, William the Conqueror, Christopher Columbus, King ...
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Come on, don’t be such a nimrod!

According to the OED, the word English Nimrod is derived from the Hebrew, where in Genesis 10:8–9 he is described as ‘a mighty one in the earth’ and ‘a mighty hunter before the Lord’. It is ...
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216 views

Are references to names, proper nouns?

We all know proper nouns refer to a specific person, place, organization, ect. Are names that do not refer to specific entities still considered proper nouns such as Samantha in the example below? If ...
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712 views

What is the correct romanization of the Russian name “Андрей” — “Andrey” or “Andrei”? [closed]

What is the most preferable: "Andrey" or "Andrei" for the Russian name "Андрей"? Wikipedia gives both variants.
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“Are” vs. “is” for proper nouns which sound plural (such as band names)

I was trying to explain to a friend that someone is no longer available on Spotify earlier today so I said the sentence: The Avalanches are no longer available on Spotify. Immediately after ...
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384 views

When to use a definite article in the name of a ship

To use examples from Star Trek, the original series and The Next Generation called their ships "The Enterprise", Enterprise varied between "Enterprise" and "The Enterprise", Deep Space Nine always had ...
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1answer
86 views

Abreviating a ship name with an apostrophe?

If a ship is named the Scienta Victoria, and I wish to drop the first word for the sake of brevity, is it proper to place an apostrophe before the "Victoria" to signify the dropped word?
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217 views

Using a pronoun and a proper noun with a descriptor

With the sentence: "If he was Little Freddie, the apple of Vinnie's eye, would have told him." Does it mean if he was Little Freddie, or was he referring to Little Freddie? I think the meaning is for ...
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Capitalization of the word “the” in “the Lord” / “The Lord”

Should I capitalize the word "the" when speaking of God as "the/The Lord"? I praise the Lord. or... I praise The Lord.
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160 views

University names? [duplicate]

I have some questions concerning names of university. What is the difference between "The Poznan University of Life Sciences" and "Poznan University of Life Sciences"? Are there any grammatical ...
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558 views

Do I need “the” before the name of my university in the header? [duplicate]

Do I need "the" before the name of my university in the header? Header: Politechnika Wroclawska - name of university in my language (the Wroclaw University of Technology) - translated name ...
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171 views

Should proper nouns be capitalized when used as verbs? [duplicate]

Should proper nouns be capitalized when used as verbs? For instance: "I Googled it" "I googled it"
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232 views

Are the names of these metrics proper nouns?

In my thesis I am writing about a number of different metrics. Not metrics in the mathematical sense, but metrics which are measures, functions. A function which takes an input and returns a symolic ...
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1answer
3k views

Possessive and plural suffixes for proper nouns ending in -s [closed]

With a name that ends in -s, such as Travis or Lewis, where and when should you use -es, -'s, -s or just leave it alone to both pluralise, and to infer belonging to? E.g., if the ball belongs to ...
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Why is it “Paris’s cafés” but “Massachusetts’ capital”?

I’ve been studying the apostrophe and found this in Merriam-Webster’s Guide to Punctuation and Style: The possessives of proper names are generally formed in the same way as those of common nouns. ...
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4answers
3k views

Should I capitalize the word 'Web' in this sentence?

A dedicated web server may be required, depending on XXX, YYY, ZZZ, and the total number of concurrent Web users
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2answers
155 views

Is there a way to refer to the biblical state of Israel in another name?

The biblical and modern day states of Israel have the same name, even though they are not the same entities. Is there a name for the biblical state of Israel which is diffrent from Israel? Like the ...
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246 views

Should “Applied Cryptography” be capitalized? Is it a proper noun?

I'm trying to write a cover letter for a fairly prestigious job, and I'm aiming for (arguably too much) perfection in my cover letter. I don't want to be turned away only because the hiring people ...
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123 views

Which expression is older: “London Royal Parks” or “London's Royal Parks” ? And why is it Hyde Park and not Hyde's Park?

London Royal Parks and London's Royal Parks Both phrases are used, and I understand that "London" in the first example is acting as an adjective. Whereas in the second, "London", is used ...
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What are the associations of the word “Heights” in a city name? [closed]

There are lots of cities and other designations with the word "Heights" in the name. Does this refer to something specific? Is it a marketing tactic perhaps? Examples: Hacienda Heights Sterling ...
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586 views

Does a name go before or after the noun it modifies?

The sentence The user “John Smith” has been registered; go to the “User Profile” tab to view the user’s details. reads more naturally to me than The “John Smith” user has been registered; go ...
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Article before newspaper name

Suppose the name of a newspaper is Pirate Times, without an article. Which of the following is then correct, and why? During the recent General Assembly, Pirate Times met… During the recent ...
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470 views

Who verbally uses the title “Miss” with a female's first name (regardless of the female's correct title) and why? [duplicate]

Who verbally uses the title "Miss" with a female's first name (regardless of the female's correct title) and why? Example: Meet with Miss Debbie in the conference room at 2 o'clock.
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In film reviews/essays about a book or film, does the title of the movie/book always have to be highlighted/put in italics?

In film reviews/essays about a book or film, does the title of the movie/book always have to be highlighted/put in italics? I know that at the start you have to put the title in italics, e.g.: ...
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Can I use the “ll” contraction with proper names?

Can I contract "will" as "ll" when preceded by a proper name? For example: John will visit you tomorrow John'll visit you tomorrow I am inclined to think this is not acceptable in standard ...
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490 views

Pronunciation of “Oceania” in British English

How is Oceania properly pronounced in British English? Is it /ˌəʊʃɪˈɑːnɪə/, or /ˌəʊʃɪˈɑːnə/? I know a lot of people who use the latter, but I have always been taught the former.
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“India have won” vs. “India has won” [duplicate]

I would like to know when to use singular or plural verb agreement when talking about a country. E.g., India have won the match. India has won the match. Which statement is grammatical? ...
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4answers
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Is it customary to call the former President George W. Bush “W.”, and Mrs. Bush “Bar”, in public?

Maureen Dowd deals with the comments of the former first lady, Barbara Bush in NBC’s the Today Show in her article titled ‘Silver Fox’s pink slip’ in New York Times (April 27): “Asked on the ...
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3answers
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In what contexts would I capitalize “city” and “county”?

In the following context, it is obvious that County is a proper noun and deserves capitalization. Currently, Albemarle County has four main reservoirs. However, in these other contexts below, I ...
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2answers
446 views

Capitalization of “School” as an adjective

I am working on a research poster, and the teacher supervising wrote the following language. It doesn't seem to me like "School" is a proper noun, but he tells me it is when referring to a specific ...
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1answer
342 views

Use “the” before a scientific method name? [closed]

I'm writing a paper about an algorithm that I have developed. Just for illustration, I will say that the method name is "quicksort". My question is about the usage of the in the following context: ...
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5answers
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How should one pronounce “Brichester”?

I know that there is this issue where Worcestershire and Leicester are pronounced as "Wustersher" and "Lester", so I wonder how Brichester is pronounced. Also, is there any special rule which could ...
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259 views

How to pronounce “Zoubin Ghahramani”? [closed]

Zoubin Ghahramani is a computer scientist and statistician. I tried Google translate but it sound a little weird. Does anyone know the pronunciation of his name? Is it from another language other than ...
2
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5answers
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Indefinite article and people's names

Sometimes, on the internet, particularly in online games, I see people using the indefinite article before someone's name: "I see a Joey" or "I hug a Polly". I know some of these people and I'm ...
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Using “the” with name of research center

The name of our research center is Southeastern Transportation Center, STC is the acronym, of course. In writing, I use STC, not 'the STC' but our director says 'the' is needed so that it reads well. ...