A proper noun or proper name is a capitalized noun representing a unique entity as opposed to a common noun, which represents a class of entities or nonunique instances of that class.

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Why are names considered proper nouns?

Names are supposed to be proper nouns because they refer to a unique entity, right? But what about when the condition of specificity is not applicable? Take the word "Albert". It's supposed to be a ...
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Adjective of proper noun containing “and”

A person from The Turks and Caicus Islands is known as what? Likewise with Trinidad and Tobago, St Kitts and Nevis, São Tomé and Principé, and Bosnia and Herzegovina. http://www.un.org/en/members/ ...
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Use of “the” in front of an application name [closed]

I am currently writing my thesis. It is based upon an application that I developed. My question is that should I use the in front of my application's name in my thesis. In this example suppose my ...
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78 views

Is the word language in this context a proper noun?

My phrase is "Spanish language TV spend" with respect to advertising on Spanish language TV ads. In this context, should the l in language be capitalized?
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72 views

Possessive case for a certain proper noun -ss apostrophe [duplicate]

In the case of the proper noun "Ross" which would be correct: 1) Ross's 2) Ross' Thank you
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195 views

What part-of-speech would a vehicle's year/make/model be?

Suppose I were to say this sentence: "I own a 2003 Ford F-150." Would 2003 Ford F-150 be a compound proper noun? Would Ford F-150 be a compound proper noun and 2003 be an adjective? Would F-150 be ...
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How to capitalize and italicize proper nouns with the same ending

Let's say there's an English Language Questionnaire and an English Usage Questionnaire (I want them to be italicized), and I want to refer to them together, by name. What should I use: The English ...
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54 views

Definite article or none in “…at Taipei Zoo” or “… at the Taipei Zoo”?

"Come see the baby panda, Yuan Zai, at Taipei Zoo" "Come see the baby panda, Yuan Zai, at the Taipei Zoo." In my opinion it should be the second choice. It belongs to a specific location ...
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64 views

Word order of participial modifiers and proper nouns

This is a follow-up to this earlier question. I want to say that I met a person and they were drunk at the time. Which should I use: I saw intoxicated John. I saw the intoxicated John. I saw John ...
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Is the word “Galapagos” transferable into adjective and verb to mean “outdated, fossilized” in English?

We have a word “Gala-kei-ガラ携” which is an abbreviation of “Galapagos (shortened as Gala” and “mobile phone (shortened as “Kei”) meaning outdated mobile phone as opposed to advanced smart-phones in ...
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46 views

What is the noun to describe the possible responses to the question “How did you hear about us?”

I am modelling the allowed responses for the question "How did you hear about us?" in a CRM (Customer Relationship Management) system. How would you name this type of entity?
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35 views

“North Building” or “the North Building”?

Our company has two buildings and they are referred to in internal communications in various forms. e.g., "the north building", "the North building" and "the North Building". I am aware that "north" ...
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“Napoleon complex” or “Napoleonic complex”? [closed]

Which is correct: "he has a Napoleon complex" or "he has a Napoleonic complex"?
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Is it “Greetings from The sunny Hague” or “Greetings from sunny The Hague”?

If I were writing a postcard home from a sunny city, I would normally put the adjective just before the proper noun like "sunny Berlin". What should I do when it's The Hague?
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Choice of relative pronouns: 'who' and/or 'that' for people?

Albert Einstein is a German-born theoretical physicist. He became world-famous for his general theory of relativity. If you turn these two sentences into one, a main clause + a relative clause, you ...
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Grammaticality of “the” in “I am going to the Asda later”

A friend of mine and I are having a long standing debate about the correctness of a sentence. Informing me what he was doing later that day he said: I am going to the Asda later. Note: To ...
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Why does English use definite articles before certain proper nouns, such as the names of ships?

Over on English Language Learners, a non-native speaker asked a question about adding "the" before movie titles. I wanted to tell him or her that the rule in English is not to add a definite article ...
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Should “popperians” be capitalized?

Popperians being people who are sympathetic with Karl Popper's views? In general, should groups of people who take their collective name from a proper noun in turn capitalize their name?
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Subject/verb agreement when a title ends in a plural

1) "The book 'The Three Musketeers' is a wonderful example of..." Here we have a proper noun, a title that happens to end in a plural, and I have no sense that the verb should be plural. ...
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Abstract noun as a proper name?

This might be silly to ask, and possibly more theoretical than anything else, but it's something I've always pondered. My first name is Hope. When I was in Elementary School and first learned about ...
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What is the best way to refer in English to a zoo all whose animals are carved in stone?

I of course don't have English as my primary language, so have some forgiveness. I would translate the name as "The Rock Zoo" (doesn't seem to make it) "The Zoo on Rock" (better) "The Zoo on Stone" ...
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52 views

Treat Hypothetical Entities as Proper Nouns?

I am working with mathematical papers and commonly encounter situations where the author designates hypothetical entities. For example: We assume that player 1 moves first. Should references to ...
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115 views

How should “Northern Europe” be capitalized?

Europe should obviously be capitalized, since it is a proper noun. Should the northern part of the example sentence "I was traveling through northern Europe." be capitalized? In country names such as ...
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175 views

Quotation marks in names of events

I'm not sure if I should leave out quotation marks in names of events. Should it be: Choir competitions “Legnica Cantat”, “Canti Veris Praga”, “IFAS Pardubice”, “Advent and Christmas Music Festival ...
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Proper noun capitalization. Language or Culture?

I've noticed over the years my perception of "correct capitalization of proper nouns" has been challenged, as I've interacted with more cultures and languages. For example: Days of the week, in ...
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Does the properness of 'Street' (in the name of a street) survive when discussing two particular streets together?

So do Smith St and Wesson St meet: "at the corner of Smith & Wesson Streets"; or "at the corner of Smith & Wesson streets"?
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What is the correct capitalization of the words earth and moon?

I believe that Earth means planet and earth means soil. But I've seen earth used in published works to mean the planet earth. But no one writes jupiter. Similarly, Moon should mean the name of ...
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Is 'major' in a musical context a noun or an adjective?

In the question What are the notes in the D major scale?, I'm trying to work out what type of word major is. A scale just means a sequence of notes with defined intervals between them, and these ...
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When did we stop translating proper names?

It used to be that one would just translate a proper name that was in another language into English when referring to that entity. For example, William the Conqueror, Christopher Columbus, King ...
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Come on, don’t be such a nimrod!

According to the OED, the word English Nimrod is derived from the Hebrew, where in Genesis 10:8–9 he is described as ‘a mighty one in the earth’ and ‘a mighty hunter before the Lord’. It is ...
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Are references to names, proper nouns?

We all know proper nouns refer to a specific person, place, organization, ect. Are names that do not refer to specific entities still considered proper nouns such as Samantha in the example below? If ...
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What is the correct romanization of the Russian name “Андрей” — “Andrey” or “Andrei”? [closed]

What is the most preferable: "Andrey" or "Andrei" for the Russian name "Андрей"? Wikipedia gives both variants.
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“Are” vs. “is” for proper nouns which sound plural (such as band names)

I was trying to explain to a friend that someone is no longer available on Spotify earlier today so I said the sentence: The Avalanches are no longer available on Spotify. Immediately after ...
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When to use a definite article in the name of a ship

To use examples from Star Trek, the original series and The Next Generation called their ships "The Enterprise", Enterprise varied between "Enterprise" and "The Enterprise", Deep Space Nine always had ...
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Abreviating a ship name with an apostrophe?

If a ship is named the Scienta Victoria, and I wish to drop the first word for the sake of brevity, is it proper to place an apostrophe before the "Victoria" to signify the dropped word?
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Using a pronoun and a proper noun with a descriptor

With the sentence: "If he was Little Freddie, the apple of Vinnie's eye, would have told him." Does it mean if he was Little Freddie, or was he referring to Little Freddie? I think the meaning is for ...
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Capitalization of the word “the” in “the Lord” / “The Lord”

Should I capitalize the word "the" when speaking of God as "the/The Lord"? I praise the Lord. or... I praise The Lord.
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Do I need “the” before the name of my university in the header? [duplicate]

Do I need "the" before the name of my university in the header? Header: Politechnika Wroclawska - name of university in my language (the Wroclaw University of Technology) - translated name ...
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Should proper nouns be capitalized when used as verbs? [duplicate]

Should proper nouns be capitalized when used as verbs? For instance: "I Googled it" "I googled it"
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Are the names of these metrics proper nouns?

In my thesis I am writing about a number of different metrics. Not metrics in the mathematical sense, but metrics which are measures, functions. A function which takes an input and returns a symolic ...
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2k views

Possessive and plural suffixes for proper nouns ending in -s [closed]

With a name that ends in -s, such as Travis or Lewis, where and when should you use -es, -'s, -s or just leave it alone to both pluralise, and to infer belonging to? E.g., if the ball belongs to ...
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Why is it “Paris’s cafés” but “Massachusetts’ capital”?

I’ve been studying the apostrophe and found this in Merriam-Webster’s Guide to Punctuation and Style: The possessives of proper names are generally formed in the same way as those of common nouns. ...
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Should I capitalize the word 'Web' in this sentence?

A dedicated web server may be required, depending on XXX, YYY, ZZZ, and the total number of concurrent Web users
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Is there a way to refer to the biblical state of Israel in another name?

The biblical and modern day states of Israel have the same name, even though they are not the same entities. Is there a name for the biblical state of Israel which is diffrent from Israel? Like the ...
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150 views

Should “Applied Cryptography” be capitalized? Is it a proper noun?

I'm trying to write a cover letter for a fairly prestigious job, and I'm aiming for (arguably too much) perfection in my cover letter. I don't want to be turned away only because the hiring people ...
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103 views

Which expression is older: “London Royal Parks” or “London's Royal Parks” ? And why is it Hyde Park and not Hyde's Park?

London Royal Parks and London's Royal Parks Both phrases are used, and I understand that "London" in the first example is acting as an adjective. Whereas in the second, "London", is used ...
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645 views

What are the associations of the word “Heights” in a city name? [closed]

There are lots of cities and other designations with the word "Heights" in the name. Does this refer to something specific? Is it a marketing tactic perhaps? Examples: Hacienda Heights Sterling ...
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Does a name go before or after the noun it modifies?

The sentence The user “John Smith” has been registered; go to the “User Profile” tab to view the user’s details. reads more naturally to me than The “John Smith” user has been registered; go ...
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Article before newspaper name

Suppose the name of a newspaper is Pirate Times, without an article. Which of the following is then correct, and why? During the recent General Assembly, Pirate Times met… During the recent ...
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Who verbally uses the title “Miss” with a female's first name (regardless of the female's correct title) and why? [duplicate]

Who verbally uses the title "Miss" with a female's first name (regardless of the female's correct title) and why? Example: Meet with Miss Debbie in the conference room at 2 o'clock.