This tag is for questions about the sounds, intonation, and stress of how words are uttered or produced.

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3
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1answer
56 views

Pronouncing “found” as “fyound”: why?

I had a teacher in high school who spoke like that, and an elderly neighbor: both women. When I first read Tom Wolfe's novel A Man in Full, I ran across this passage: "You must be Mr. DeCyasi," ...
3
votes
1answer
327 views

etymology and pronunciation of bowline knot

The wikipedia article for bowline gives two pronunciations /boʊlɪn/ or /boʊlaɪn/. The history section says: The bowline's name has an earlier meaning, dating to the age of sail. On a ...
2
votes
1answer
339 views

Why are “suffice” and “sufficient” pronounced so differently?

Today I heard somebody use a form of the verb "suffice" (which means "to be sufficient") pronouncing it like the verb "surface" without an r (and where that "a" makes more of an "i" sound). This ...
2
votes
1answer
162 views

The word “mine”: Anyone else use a velar nasal /maiŋ/ for “belongs to me” meaning, but still /main/ for “explosive”/“coal mine”?

I think I naturally distinguish these words: mine (ie "belongs to me") /maiŋ/ mine (ie "explosive" or "coal mine") /main/ I vaguely remember noticing this years ago, but I was only just reminded of ...
1
vote
1answer
45 views

Pronunciation of luxury

Is there a reason that Americans now pronounce luxury "lugsury" instead of "lucshury" while still pronouncing "extract" and "extra" with the more common "x" sound?
1
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1answer
48 views

how to pronounce “th”

It's a weird question , I want to know how to pronounce "th" correctly as in (the or thin) should i bring my tongue out of my teeth :D In Arabic(as my native lang.), the correct pronunciation of ...
5
votes
0answers
122 views

Why does “alcohol” end with /ɔl/ for some American speakers? Which ones?

For American English speakers, the written sequence "ol" usually corresponds to the pronunciation /oʊl/ (like in cold), /oʊ/ (like in yolk), or /ɑl/ (like in collar); or to /əl/ when unstressed (like ...
3
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0answers
90 views

Shakespeare's Scansion: the Sequel

Okay, so we seem to have established (with lots of great and generous help from StoneyB and Peter Shor) that: where it came to certain diphthongs, Shakespeare either elided syllables that didn't ...
2
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0answers
28 views

Could you clarify /e/ and /ɛ/?

This is quite confused! In the Standard IPA Vowel chart, there are /e/ and /ɛ/, see the bellowed picture (Source) However, many American English Vowel charts don't have /e/. So, I think that Some ...
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0answers
14 views

Could you Clarify the Front - Back & Close - Open position & other positions in between in IPA vowel chart?

See the IPA vowel chart A front vowel is any in a class of vowel sound used in some spoken languages. The defining characteristic of a front vowel is that the tongue is positioned as far in ...
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0answers
38 views

Phonograms ey and ie

My son is using Spalding phonogram cards in his kindergarten class. I like them for the most part, aside from a few weird examples and explanations that aren't quite right, but that I can live with. ...
1
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0answers
43 views

Words that are spoken one way but written another

I was recently involved in answering this question: Renumeration vs Remuneration (reimbursed financially), which is correct? Which asks whether "renumeration" or "remuneration" is correct in terms ...
1
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0answers
52 views

In which vowel do the diphthongs [aʊ] and [aɪ] start?

Surfing the web, I found the following explanations on how to produce the diphthongs [aʊ] and [aɪ]: "/aʊ/ as in all the words of "How now brown cow!". The starting position is the vowel sound /æ/ as ...
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0answers
51 views

In some parts of America, do people there COMMONLY use flap T after n, ex “/ˈwɪn.t̬ɚ/”?

I noticed that, in some American dialect (maybe in the South of America), people may use "flap T" after "n". For example, "/ˈwɪn.t̬ɚ/" source Other example, "ninety" /ˈnaɪn.t̬i/Source So, my ...
1
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0answers
58 views

When to reduce and when not to reduce a vowel ([ɪ] & [i])

Most of the time people reduce vowels in speech when these are not stressed, but sometimes these unstressed vowels are fully pronounced, too. For example, most people reduce the [ɪ] to schwa and say ...
1
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0answers
145 views

Rhotic accent in London or in the rest of the UK?

Good evening or good afternoon for the American. I read and it is known that most British accents are non-rhotic, but I’m now in London and I have the feeling that the Rs after vowels and before a ...
1
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0answers
168 views

Is effect pronounced as /ɪˈfekt/ or as /əˈfekt/?

This page ( https://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/american_english/effect ) lists it as /əˈfekt/ for American English, but when you click on the pronounce button it is pronounced as /ɪˈfekt/. ...
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0answers
102 views

Pronunciation of “Personally” and “Finally”

I always hear people say "personly" and "finely" instead of "personally" and "finally" when they speak. I wonder whether this reduction can apply to other words ending with "-nally"? Just like ...
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0answers
94 views

Exaggerating the pronunciation of a vowel or consonant

Is there a word for exaggerating the pronunciation of a vowel or consonant by holding it longer than normal? When conveying this in writing, does it fall in the same category as an accent or dialect ...
1
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0answers
112 views

Why are these spellings pronounced “non phonetically?”

In Anglo English, the word ewe (female sheep) is pronounced "you," rather than, say, "e-weh." Likewise, the surname Ewell, is pronounced "yule," rather than "e-well." Why is that?
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0answers
84 views

Pronunciation of Who is it?

I heard the question "Who is it?" in a movie. [Person A] knocked on a door. [Person B] came to open the door, but before that he asks "Who is it?" This three syllables question can be pronounced ...
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0answers
217 views

Sentence stress and word linking with the problematic Y?

the question: Can I use your bathroom? phonetically looks like: [kə_naɪ ˈyuz yər ˈbæθˌrum] I think the stress should be on the verb USE and the noun BATHROOM. Am I right? Some dictionaries show the ...
1
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0answers
198 views

Is a syllable defined phonetically or etymologically?

Reading recent postings about syllables I've been struck and baffled by talk of the possibility that words may have a different number of syllables when they are written than when they are spoken. Is ...
0
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0answers
30 views

How do you tell the difference between “wrong” and “run” in perception test?

Background Just developing a linguistic test - native English speakers can pass(100% correct), and L2 learners cannnot pass(even though they are very proficient). "Wrong vs run" pair was chosen. ...
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0answers
19 views

why “come into a place” sounds like /kʌməntsə/ /pleis/

Two sentences from 60-Second Science Now a study finds that a teacher's racial biases come into play in different ways for high-achieving kids versus low-performing ones. While listening to music, ...
0
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0answers
42 views

Is Lana's “Yup!” a triphthong?

At some point in the Archer series, Lana starts saying very emphatic Yup!s. I was recently wondering about triphthongs and whether they occur in English, and found the Wikipedia entry had only a few ...
0
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0answers
38 views

Technique of pronouncing the rhotic “r”

I, as a German native speaker, have two "techniques" of pronouncing the rhotic "r." I describe them as follows: I move my tongue upward, so it touches the upper row of my teeth and then just make a ...
0
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0answers
44 views

Proper pronunciation of the short a

When I hear the "short a" vowel pronounced it doesn't seem as fronted as it should. (I'm talking about the vowel found in words such as bad, lamp, clam, crash, usually transcribed with /æ/ in the IPA, ...
0
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0answers
54 views

The pronunciation of the definite article by American speakers

I was reading an article the other day and I came across an interesting passage: Notice that the weak form of the is typically [ði] before a vowel-initial word (the apple) but [ðə] before a ...
0
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0answers
59 views

Using voice commands to check pronounciation

I'm a non-native speaker and, many time, I struggle to get the proper/accurate pronunciation of a word. To check my pronunciation, I would use voice commands assistance (or whatever they call them) ...
0
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0answers
243 views

Does the word “ball” have a “short a” sound?

Does the word ball have a short "a" sound, or is it there another definition for the vowel sound? It certainly sounds different from tap and cat.
0
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0answers
158 views

Root pronunciation change when adding suffix

Can someone provide the proper academic terms and explanations for why we pronounce the roots of the following words differently: sociopath vs. sociopathy telepath vs. telepathy ...
0
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0answers
32 views

which word gives emphasis to other word

If A-cum-B denotes that, A and B are similar standing Which word describes B has having greater significance than A? For example : Accounts cum Finance means - both accounts and finance are of ...
0
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0answers
42 views

Is the 'au' phoneme on the decline?

I live in the midwest, grew up in Chicago. Here, altho there is usually a clear distinction between au like in 'auditorium' and o like in 'on', the 2 are often used interchangeably in ordinary ...
0
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0answers
59 views

Why is “Yosemite” spelled that way?

Well I'm not a native English speaker, but sometimes I get the feeling that English words' pronunciation is random. Why is "Yosemite" is being pronounced as "Yoh-Sem-Ee-Tee" and written as "Yosemite" ...
0
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0answers
250 views

Confused about sound /a/ & /ɔ/ in English Vowel diagram and in English dictionary?

Given this vowel diagram: Could you explain the difference between: /a/ as in five /faɪv/ /ɑː/ as in RP arm /ɑːm/ /ɒ/ as in RP hot /hɒt/ /ɔː/ as in RP law /lɔː/ Is /ɒ/ the same as /ɔː/? ...
0
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0answers
80 views

One-but-love split

I am not a native speaker of English, so I couldn't find the answer by myself. Any help would be appreciated. I have the feeling that the sound written ʌ as in /bʌt/, /wʌn/ and /lʌv/, is pronounced ...
0
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0answers
44 views

Do you pronounce official as /əˈfiSHəl/?

Do you pronounce official as /əˈfiSHəl/? I thought it was pronounced with an "o" sound as in the word "office" in the beginning of the word instead of a schwa (ə) sound. In the Cambridge dictionary ...
0
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0answers
42 views

Has there ever been “ 'tis ” in AmE?

'Tis which is the contraction of it is. I heard it was contracted due to the way it's pronounced--the accent; because the accent is at the T. So, just wondering if AmE uses this 'tis, where T's tend ...
0
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0answers
45 views

How to pronounce Isabirra (type of cheese)?

Isabirra is a type of cheese. http://www.cheese.com/isabirra/ I couldn't find a source of its pronunciation. Can anybody help me with its pronunciation (in the most layman form). Thanks
0
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0answers
251 views

Words with primary and secondary stress in a phrase

In the phrase "I'm in the same situation" the word "situation" phonetically looks like: [ˌsɪtʃ uˈeɪ ʃən] The first syllable of the word has secondary stress and the third syllable has primary ...
0
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0answers
93 views

Are both “How did you” and “Howdja” used?

How did you get here? [ 'haʊ dɪdʒʊ 'gɛt hɪər? ] I took the bus. How did you get here? [ 'haʊdʒə 'gɛt hɪər? ] I took the train. My question: are both "haʊ dɪdʒʊ" and "haʊdʒə" used in American ...
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0answers
59 views

Stress in the question: How about you?

If I transcribe this question "How about you?" to IPA it looks like: [ haʊ əˈbaʊt yu]. The dictionary shows the word "about" with primary stress on its second syllable but I think in my question it ...
0
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0answers
96 views

Transcribing the pronunciation of “emission” on merriam-webster.com

I think the pronunciation of the word, emission, at merriam-webster.com is incorrectly labeled. According to their way of transcribing a pronunciation, their transcription of the pronunciation of the ...
0
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0answers
374 views

Sentence stress: I'm sort of busy right now

I heard this phrase in a TV show: "I'm sort of busy right now". You can listen it here (I cut out the phrase): https://clyp.it/4khla44l Phonetically it looks like: [ɑɪm soərt əv bɪzi raɪt naʊ]. The ...
0
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0answers
58 views

a flap in “video”

I asked here recently about a word "oratory". Somebody told me there is no flap in American English, because a t is before a stressed vowel (second stress). It's right. But why there is no flap in ...
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0answers
82 views

What's the correct pronunciation of 'improcerous'?

The word improcerous means 'low' or 'short in stature'. How is it pronounced?
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0answers
110 views

Regional pronunciation of “houndstooth” as “houndsooth”

I have always pronounced "houndstooth" as ˈhau̇n(d)z-ˌtüth , the exact same way I would pronounce the phrase "hound's tooth". Recently, I was told that the pronunciation should be "hound sooth", ...
0
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0answers
81 views

i vs. I in “pink” “ring”

I've always transcribed "pink" and "ring" with the vowel /I/ (lax) vs. the tense /i/, and my students have never argued with me about it, but suddenly I've been getting a good number of students ...
0
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0answers
89 views

Linking confusion

I just want to ask a quick question that is confused to me, in the verb phrase: "picked out". When I link these words together, I say "pick tout". However, my English teacher told me that is not ...