This tag is for questions about the sounds, intonation, and stress of how words are uttered or produced.

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Ipa vowels relationships

Lately I'm into improving my english (UK) pronunciation. I'm using the IPA chart for such purpose. I was wondering if there's any relationship between the ə sound and the several diphthongs that ...
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42 views

How do we get pronunciation Yoost to?

In this thread How does the phrase "used to" work, grammatically? the construct "used to" is discussed but there is no mention of its pronunciation. Here (Canada) the "used" in this phrase ...
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61 views

Stress pattern changes with noun and verb homographs: exceptions to the rule

We all know that words that can be used both as nouns and verbs have a different stress pattern: http://www.wordstress.info/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/Stress-Pattern-Change-noun-verb-pairs.pdf As a ...
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125 views

In which vowel do the diphthongs [aʊ] and [aɪ] start?

Surfing the web, I found the following explanations on how to produce the diphthongs [aʊ] and [aɪ]: "/aʊ/ as in all the words of "How now brown cow!". The starting position is the vowel sound /æ/ as ...
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58 views

Pronunciation difference between “Mayonnaise” & “Vase”

I've seen quite many people pronounce "Mayonnaise" with "-s" at the end, although its phonetic alphabet is written as '/meɪəneɪz/'. So at first I thought /eɪ/ + s could be versatile as /eɪs/ or /eɪz/, ...
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66 views

Is day-ta more common in the South or the North of the US?

So I've read that dah-ta is more common in the US than in other places, but is day-ta or dah-ta more common to hear in the South? I haven't been able to find that out for sure.
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83 views

“hundred” and “pretty” pronounced respectively as [ˈhən-dərd] and [ˈpər-tē]

Merriam-Webster's A Pronouncing Dictionary of American English gives [ˈhən-dərd], [ˈpər-tē], [ˈtem-pə(r)-ˌchu̇r], [ˈse-kə(r)-ˌterē], etc., as alternate ways to pronounce "hundred," "pretty," "...
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84 views

Could you Clarify the Front - Back & Close - Open position & other positions in between in IPA vowel chart?

See the IPA vowel chart A front vowel is any in a class of vowel sound used in some spoken languages. The defining characteristic of a front vowel is that the tongue is positioned as far in ...
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67 views

Phonograms ey and ie

My son is using Spalding phonogram cards in his kindergarten class. I like them for the most part, aside from a few weird examples and explanations that aren't quite right, but that I can live with. ...
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60 views

Words that are spoken one way but written another

I was recently involved in answering this question: Renumeration vs Remuneration (reimbursed financially), which is correct? Which asks whether "renumeration" or "remuneration" is correct in terms ...
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56 views

In some parts of America, do people there COMMONLY use flap T after n, ex “/ˈwɪn.t̬ɚ/”?

I noticed that, in some American dialect (maybe in the South of America), people may use "flap T" after "n". For example, "/ˈwɪn.t̬ɚ/" source Other example, "ninety" /ˈnaɪn.t̬i/Source So, my ...
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69 views

When to reduce and when not to reduce a vowel ([ɪ] & [i])

Most of the time people reduce vowels in speech when these are not stressed, but sometimes these unstressed vowels are fully pronounced, too. For example, most people reduce the [ɪ] to schwa and say /...
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155 views

Rhotic accent in London or in the rest of the UK?

Good evening or good afternoon for the American. I read and it is known that most British accents are non-rhotic, but I’m now in London and I have the feeling that the Rs after vowels and before a ...
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231 views

Is effect pronounced as /ɪˈfekt/ or as /əˈfekt/?

This page ( https://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/american_english/effect ) lists it as /əˈfekt/ for American English, but when you click on the pronounce button it is pronounced as /ɪˈfekt/. ...
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111 views

Pronunciation of “Personally” and “Finally”

I always hear people say "personly" and "finely" instead of "personally" and "finally" when they speak. I wonder whether this reduction can apply to other words ending with "-nally"? Just like "...
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121 views

Exaggerating the pronunciation of a vowel or consonant

Is there a word for exaggerating the pronunciation of a vowel or consonant by holding it longer than normal? When conveying this in writing, does it fall in the same category as an accent or dialect (...
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91 views

Pronunciation of Who is it?

I heard the question "Who is it?" in a movie. [Person A] knocked on a door. [Person B] came to open the door, but before that he asks "Who is it?" This three syllables question can be pronounced ...
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261 views

Sentence stress and word linking with the problematic Y?

the question: Can I use your bathroom? phonetically looks like: [kə_naɪ ˈyuz yər ˈbæθˌrum] I think the stress should be on the verb USE and the noun BATHROOM. Am I right? Some dictionaries show the ...
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233 views

Is a syllable defined phonetically or etymologically?

Reading recent postings about syllables I've been struck and baffled by talk of the possibility that words may have a different number of syllables when they are written than when they are spoken. Is ...
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101 views

i vs. I in “pink” “ring”

I've always transcribed "pink" and "ring" with the vowel /I/ (lax) vs. the tense /i/, and my students have never argued with me about it, but suddenly I've been getting a good number of students ...
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22 views

How should “pinisi” be pronounced?

Yesterday, while searching the Internet for Indonesian sailing ships, I came across the Wikipedia article for the pinisi. No pronunciation is given in that article, and I was unable to find anything ...
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21 views

Pronunciation of Gariepy

Gariepy is a surname. From what I've seen, it seems to be a French/Canadian surname, so I'd expect /garje'pi/ (actually with a French uvular /ʀ/). I have heard it pronounced /ga'riepi/ by my Calculus ...
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58 views

Are there any dialects of English that pronounce “regalia” as “rəˈɡälyə”?

Google tells me that it sounds like this: rəˈɡālyə Other resources say: merriam-webster.com: /ri-ˈgāl-yə/ dictionary.com: /ri-gey-lee-uh/, /-geyl-yuh/ dictionary.cambridge.org: /rɪˈɡeɪl·jə/ ...
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52 views

Pronunciation of “Attribute”

My question: Is it common to use the same pronunciation of the word "attribute" for both the verb and noun? If so, how does this vary geographically? Explanation: I'm from Michigan and have always ...
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46 views

The word “royal”

I noticed this because of the Youtube videos about the to-be-released Pokemon game. There is a new battling style called "Battle Royal" and in those videos they pronounce royal as "roi-aww," putting ...
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33 views

The American R Tongue Moving

I heard basically there're two ways to pronounce American R correctly. American Accent Training, on which I'm lately work, says "Another way to get to 'er' is to go from the ee sound and slide your ...
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30 views

IPA phonetic not phonemic database for english or polish language

Does anyone know place where I could download free or buy database with words and theirs pronunciations in IPA phonetic (not phonemic) and with division into syllables? CMU Dictionary hasn't stored ...
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47 views

weak and strong pronunciation of 'until' and 'because'

We have the weak /ənˈtɪl/ and strong /ʌnˈtɪl/ pronunciation of until and /bɪˈkəz/ - /bɪˈkɒz/ for because. Could somebody give me some examples of sentences where we would use each? For example, if I ...
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20 views

Should I use commas to delimit a clause that starts with “related to”

I have the following comment in my programming code: pop and store data related to nested objects from validated_data I wonder, should the related to nested objects clause be surrounded by ...
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53 views

'O' Pronunciation

I noticed recently that my friends and I pronounce words like "forest," "orange," and "florida" differently. For example, I noticed that there seem to be three ways that people pronounce these words: ...
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63 views

vowel sound in “stair” pronounced similarly as the “eɪ” diphthong in “fake”?

Sometimes in words which have the ɛ sound followed by an "r" as in "stair", "their" "bear", "where" I hear them pronounced like "steɪəɹ", ðeɪəɹ etc. with the "eɪ" as in "fake", "lake","make" and not ...
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92 views

The pronunciation of the letter r in British English

For me as a german speaker, the English "r" sound is one of my most hated sounds in the English language since they're barely any other languages who use this r. I know that the British r is not ...
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36 views

Help with pronunciation: Difference between 2 variations of the “short u” sound

I really need to distinguish between the 2 variations of the short u sound (in the red box in the pic below, many dictionaries have instructions for pronunciation like this). I can understand the ...
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31 views

Was “pronunshiation” ever a common pronunciation of “pronunciation”?

I came across an old prescriptive pronunciation guide from 1843 that says "pronunciation" ought to be pronounced "pronunshiation" (with /ʃi/ instead of /si/). The author says that the pronunciation ...
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79 views

What are the stress patterns and intonation patterns in “wh” questions?

I have a few problems with stress and inotation when asking questions in English. For example Do we need to stress the question words like "where" "how" or "what"? what is the inotation pattern?
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41 views

Can the “t” letter be uttered as a flap t before the letter “h”?

I know the flap-t is usually used when the "t" is between vowels or between an "r" and a vowel, but I think I can also hear it betwenn vowels and the "h". And I noticed the same with the "g" I think. ...
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50 views

How do you tell the difference between “wrong” and “run” in perception test?

Background Just developing a linguistic test - native English speakers can pass(100% correct), and L2 learners cannnot pass(even though they are very proficient). "Wrong vs run" pair was chosen. ...
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25 views

why “come into a place” sounds like /kʌməntsə/ /pleis/

Two sentences from 60-Second Science Now a study finds that a teacher's racial biases come into play in different ways for high-achieving kids versus low-performing ones. While listening to music, ...
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43 views

Is Lana's “Yup!” a triphthong?

At some point in the Archer series, Lana starts saying very emphatic Yup!s. I was recently wondering about triphthongs and whether they occur in English, and found the Wikipedia entry had only a few ...
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48 views

Technique of pronouncing the rhotic “r”

I, as a German native speaker, have two "techniques" of pronouncing the rhotic "r." I describe them as follows: I move my tongue upward, so it touches the upper row of my teeth and then just make a ...
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53 views

Proper pronunciation of the short a

When I hear the "short a" vowel pronounced it doesn't seem as fronted as it should. (I'm talking about the vowel found in words such as bad, lamp, clam, crash, usually transcribed with /æ/ in the IPA, ...
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65 views

The pronunciation of the definite article by American speakers

I was reading an article the other day and I came across an interesting passage: Notice that the weak form of the is typically [ði] before a vowel-initial word (the apple) but [ðə] before a ...
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68 views

Using voice commands to check pronounciation

I'm a non-native speaker and, many time, I struggle to get the proper/accurate pronunciation of a word. To check my pronunciation, I would use voice commands assistance (or whatever they call them) ...
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524 views

Does the word “ball” have a “short a” sound?

Does the word ball have a short "a" sound, or is it there another definition for the vowel sound? It certainly sounds different from tap and cat.
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403 views

Root pronunciation change when adding suffix

Can someone provide the proper academic terms and explanations for why we pronounce the roots of the following words differently: sociopath vs. sociopathy telepath vs. telepathy ...
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32 views

which word gives emphasis to other word

If A-cum-B denotes that, A and B are similar standing Which word describes B has having greater significance than A? For example : Accounts cum Finance means - both accounts and finance are of ...
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46 views

Is the 'au' phoneme on the decline?

I live in the midwest, grew up in Chicago. Here, altho there is usually a clear distinction between au like in 'auditorium' and o like in 'on', the 2 are often used interchangeably in ordinary ...
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69 views

Why is “Yosemite” spelled that way?

Well I'm not a native English speaker, but sometimes I get the feeling that English words' pronunciation is random. Why is "Yosemite" is being pronounced as "Yoh-Sem-Ee-Tee" and written as "Yosemite" ...
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350 views

Confused about sound /a/ & /ɔ/ in English Vowel diagram and in English dictionary?

Given this vowel diagram: Could you explain the difference between: /a/ as in five /faɪv/ /ɑː/ as in RP arm /ɑːm/ /ɒ/ as in RP hot /hɒt/ /ɔː/ as in RP law /lɔː/ Is /ɒ/ the same as /ɔː/? ...