This tag is for questions about the sounds, intonation, and stress of how words are uttered or produced.

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2
votes
1answer
105 views

Why does Tom Hanks pronounce “stupid” as “st-you-pid” in “The Bonfire of the Vanities”?

This may or may not related to my previous question. In this movie (which is based on another one of Tom Wolfe's novels, The Bonfire of the Vanities, Tom Hanks plays the lead character who is an Ivy ...
3
votes
1answer
77 views

Pronouncing “found” as “fyound”: why?

I had a teacher in high school who spoke like that, and an elderly neighbor: both women. When I first read Tom Wolfe's novel A Man in Full, I ran across this passage: "You must be Mr. DeCyasi," ...
3
votes
2answers
125 views

Intensification of Consonants in English Pronunciation

In many languages, my mother tongue included, you frequently encounter words that have an intensified consonant within them, especially if the consonant is between two vowels. A good idea to ...
1
vote
1answer
93 views

How to make clear the difference between 0 and O?

It's reasonably clear that there's a difference between the lowercase "o" and "0", but it's harder to tell with a uppercase "O" and "0". When saying them, certainly in the UK, "Oh" can be both o and ...
1
vote
1answer
95 views

Lenis and Fortis Clusters Assimilation

I've been looking for my answer but I still haven't found what I want. I have a question regarding lenis voiceless+fortis voiceless clusters (in American English). Does the fortis voiceless consonant ...
1
vote
0answers
51 views

Words that are spoken one way but written another

I was recently involved in answering this question: Renumeration vs Remuneration (reimbursed financially), which is correct? Which asks whether "renumeration" or "remuneration" is correct in terms ...
2
votes
1answer
50 views

When did “-tile” and “-sile” (in missile and volatile) become “-tl” (or “tahyl”)?

The dictionary states as follows: [vol-uh-tl, -til or, esp. British, -tahyl] Especially British? Hmm. Don't kill me: I've never heard the following lyrics actually performed; I've only read them; ...
0
votes
2answers
61 views

“Potential” pronunciation

I was raised to pronounce "potential" with a long o (ō). This makes sense where the syllables are divided. Yet, the online dictionaries I have checked say it is "puh". Can you comment?
4
votes
1answer
157 views

Why are there no English nouns starting with “th” pronounced as /ð/?

I just saw a claim that there are no nouns in English that start with "th" pronounced as /ð/, and I am convinced that is correct for at least Received Pronunciation, General American and Australian ...
-1
votes
2answers
70 views

How do you pronounce Calvin in British English

How do the British pronounce the 'a' between c and l? Is it like 'callous' or 'call'?
-1
votes
1answer
60 views

English pronunciation of the letter “a” [closed]

I heard the letter a was pronounced /ei/, and sometimes it was pronounced as /ə/. So, can you tell me when is it pronounced as /ei/, and when as /ə/?
2
votes
5answers
162 views

How do you say 7/7?

We have several service agreements, but we're not sure how you actually say 7/7. A 7/7 service agreement means support every day (even weekends), during business hours. Do you just call it ...
4
votes
4answers
274 views

Adding an L when appending an -ium suffix to a word? (Metallium vs. Metalium)

I am Romanizing a business name from Hebrew, and am wondering what the most appealing or 'correct' spelling might be - Metallium or Metalium. The owners of the business went with the latter, but my ...
6
votes
3answers
832 views

Explanation and rules for adding and subtracting 'r's in British pronunciation?

For example, the sentence, "The Premier of China drank vodka and beer in his car with Obama." A BBC presenter would pronounce it like: The Premieh of Chiner drank vodker and bee'h in his ca' with ...
1
vote
1answer
86 views

how to read numbers of 6 digit in formal english

How to say these two numbers: 112177 eleven hundrends thousands and twenty one hundren and seventy seven one hundred and twelve thousands and one hundred seventy seven the same for this number ...
2
votes
1answer
85 views

How do I know where to place the stress?

In questions that start with interrogative pronouns such as: what, when, and why, should they be stressed? For example, is the word "time" stressed in the sentence? Is "What" stressed, too? What ...
1
vote
1answer
63 views

Choose a username is easy to remember and pronounce [closed]

English is not my mother tongue language. But I am trying to pick a good internet user name for my new career life in America. And I read a lot of "How to Naming" article but still have no idea. I ...
8
votes
4answers
975 views

How to read “and/or” aloud

Is this read as and or or? Because it doesn't sound right while speaking aloud. Or is there some other way you can say it?
0
votes
1answer
80 views

Why do people write “Hellooo” instead of “Heeello” to show a prolonged sound? [closed]

I'm not a native English speaker, so I don't know what to search for on Google and similar. In chats I often read words like 'helloooo', or 'sureeee'. And as I understood it, it's meant to mimic the ...
1
vote
1answer
113 views

Does Bender from Futurama sound like a non-American? [closed]

Robot Bender is one of the main characters in the animated television series 'Futurama'. Bender — Best moments (5 minute video). Does Bender speak ‘proper’ American English? Does he have an ...
4
votes
1answer
83 views

How to pronounce “th”

It's a weird question. I want to know how to pronounce "th" correctly, as in 'the' or 'thin'. Should I bring my tongue out of my teeth? In Arabic (as my native language), the correct pronunciation ...
2
votes
1answer
115 views

Why is /e/ generally transcribed as 'ay'?

I’ve seen pretty often in phonetic transcriptions for English speakers who weren’t familiar with the IPA the phoneme /e/ or /ɛ/ transcribed as ay: Here "lejos" (/'le.xos/) is transcribed as ...
2
votes
1answer
41 views

Text for exhibiting different pronunciations

I'm looking for a text that can be used to showcase various differences in pronunciation across English accents. For example, it could include examples of the various splits/mergers (Mary/merry/mary, ...
5
votes
3answers
429 views

'Sag' and 'slant': Is the vowel /æ/ the same in both words?

/sæg/ /slænt/ Transcriptions from Cambridge American English Dictionary Both the words' IPA transcriptions have an /æ/ symbol. Do those two /æ/s sound the same? Are they both short or ...
7
votes
1answer
84 views

History/origin of the pronunciation/spelling of “Butcher”?

The pronunciation of the first syllable of butcher as /ˈbʊt͡ʃ ..../ is for non-native speakers astonishing. From spelling alone, one would probably guess that it's pronunciation would be more like ...
5
votes
2answers
106 views

Pronunciation of -ar in Madagascar

In the movie by the same name, the characters pronounce Madagascar, /mædəɡæskɑɹ/. However, dictionaries only list the pronunciation /mædəɡæskəɹ/. Just as peculiarly, many pronounce templar as ...
0
votes
2answers
68 views

Do people really say “What is that mean” or it just sounds like that?

I often hear people saying something that sounds like "What is that mean" on TV and the Internet but I am wondering whether they really mean that or they actually say "What does it mean". If the ...
5
votes
2answers
784 views

How do Americans pronounce the 't' in “romantic”, “countable”, etc?

As for a 't' trapped between /n/ and a vowel, I've heard it pronounced in three different ways: Maybe the formal, standard way is to fully pronounce the /t/ sound: romantic: /roʊˈmæntɪk/ ...
3
votes
1answer
68 views

What dictates how new words should be pronounced? [closed]

Say the word 'libuv', which is a relatively new support library in computer programming. If I can't find any references on the web as to how it should be pronounced, how do I say it? And in general ...
6
votes
2answers
287 views

Are you googlable?

The search engine Google was launched in 1998 and on that same year, the term googling was first used. The verb “to google” earned its official status in the Oxford English Dictionary on June 15, ...
0
votes
0answers
43 views

Is Lana's “Yup!” a triphthong?

At some point in the Archer series, Lana starts saying very emphatic Yup!s. I was recently wondering about triphthongs and whether they occur in English, and found the Wikipedia entry had only a few ...
3
votes
0answers
62 views

Why is w considered a consonant? [duplicate]

I've always been taught that the character "w" in English was a consonant, except in very specific cases. However, on a recent trip to Wales, I learned that in Welsh it was considered a vowel. And ...
2
votes
1answer
95 views

Why do British people say Van Gough different than American people? [closed]

Americans say Van Go but British say it Van Goff
2
votes
0answers
72 views

How does this word sound to English-speakers? [closed]

I want to name my project with a word from Ukrainian language. Transliterating it would be spelled as Ostriv. And I'd like to be sure that it doesn't sound bad for English-speakers or isn't hard to ...
3
votes
1answer
176 views

How to pronounce “do you”, “would you” and their negative contractions

I don't know now how to pronounce phrases like "do you", "would you" and their negative contractions. For a while ago I though it's correct to pronounce "do/would you" (and even have [not] + V3) ...
6
votes
5answers
860 views

Do we pronounce a “t” sound in negative contractions “n't”

I'm faced with difficulties how to pronounce contractions like don't, wouldn't, and etc. correctly. Somehow I read from some grammar British student book that "t" is not pronounced but I didn't pay ...
2
votes
4answers
197 views

How to pronounce a superscript ə?

And why there's a superscript ə? just found this on the dictionary.cambridge.org ...
3
votes
1answer
72 views

What's the right prosody/pronunciation in “possessive + gerund” constructions?

From a previous post, I’ve seen that both (a) and (b) are acceptable, the difference lying in the register (formal vs colloquial) each sentence conveys. (a) She resented him being invited to open ...
0
votes
1answer
34 views

a ssl or an ssl? [duplicate]

I was talking about ssl somewhere, then I saw 'an ssl' was used on some other websites. For example, https://www.globalsign.com/en/ssl-information-center/what-is-an-ssl-certificate/ But SSL word ...
10
votes
1answer
137 views

Night rain vs Night train, gemination?

The Wikipedia article on gemination claims that gemination of /t/ is the distinguishing factor between the pronunciation of the two phrases night train and night rain. In my whole life, I've almost ...
1
vote
2answers
131 views

The pronunciation of “peripheral”

Some time ago, I heard the pronunciation of the word peripheral on a TV show (Brain Games, to be exact). Very surprised to hear /pəɹɪfəɹəl/, I asked two close relatives whether that was how the word ...
6
votes
1answer
151 views

The X in Xavier

The NOAD lists the pronunciation of Xavier as (ig)ˈzāvēər. In my own experience the parenthetical pronunciation is very common. I, however, do not know of any other x-initial words that are ...
4
votes
1answer
151 views

So, “carrots too” (/ˈkærəts tuː/) can sound like “Carrot Sue” (/ˈkærət suː/), right?

Look at this video at 1:09 (Source). The man said "carrots too" /ˈkærəts tuː/ but it sounds like he said /ˈkærət suː/. The /t/ got omitted completely. However, I don't see people omit /t/ in "stamp" ...
-1
votes
2answers
102 views

How to pronounce epitome? [closed]

I have always been pronouncing it as ye-pi-to-m. Usage Kala was considered the epitome(ye-pi-to-m) of success by her gym trainer after she lost 30 kgs in just 3 months. Is it not the case? ...
0
votes
0answers
45 views

Technique of pronouncing the rhotic “r”

I, as a German native speaker, have two "techniques" of pronouncing the rhotic "r." I describe them as follows: I move my tongue upward, so it touches the upper row of my teeth and then just make a ...
0
votes
1answer
36 views

Is there a standard for simplified pronunciation hints?

Often in introductory textbooks, new terms are introduced with a simplified pronunciation hint. For example, pharmaceutical (FAR-muh-sue-ti-kal) It's certainly not IPA or even the types of ...
2
votes
1answer
87 views

Differences between formal and colloquial English? [closed]

What are the basic differences between formal and colloquial English? Is it right that colloquial English uses more contracted forms, slang expressions, phrasal verbs, subjunctive, and euphemisms? ...
25
votes
8answers
3k views

Does anyone use both “whinge” and “whine?”

The words "whinge" and "whine" have separate (albeit very similar) definitions in the OED, and they have distinct pronunciations. "Whinge" seems completely restricted to BritE; I have never heard it ...
2
votes
1answer
52 views

clothing should be pronounced as /ˈkloʊ.zɪŋ/ or /ˈkloʊ.ðɪŋ/?

Ok, I checked up some dictionary and found that most dictionaries pronounce "clothing" as /ˈkloʊ.ðɪŋ/ Cambridge, Oxford, M-w However, when checking the voice, Cambridge & Oxford seem to ...
1
vote
1answer
43 views

Do we link (in speech) between 2 stressed words in a sentence?

Ok, see this word "good" /ɡʊd/ & this word "idea" /aɪˈdɪə/ Ok, now if we have a phrase "I have a good idea" /aɪ həvə ɡʊd aɪˈdɪə/, then which of the followings are right and which are wrong: ...