This tag is for questions about the sounds, intonation, and stress of how words are uttered or produced.

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1answer
100 views

Pronunciation of 'Con' words

Is there any rule for the pronunciation of 'Con' words like : Constant, Constraint, Constitute, Constituent etc. My confusion is with these sounds 'kɒn' and 'kən'. For Constiuent it is ...
0
votes
1answer
70 views

“P-U-L-L” vs. “P-U-double L”

I have heard some people spell double letters individually, e.g. "B-B", "C-C", or "D-D". But I have also heard others use the word double instead. Is there any dialectical preference? Is there any ...
2
votes
1answer
152 views

Where in the U.S. do people change the stress of umbrella, adult and TV to the first syllable?

Is it just a small percentage of the population in that region who stress the first syllable, or is it widespread? In other words, if I visit such region will I find almost everyone talking like that ...
2
votes
3answers
408 views

Why do some people say “v” as “w”?

I've noticed that Germans and Indians will sometimes say "/w/ector space" instead of "/v/ector space". I get that in German "w" is pronounced /v/. But "vau" (German "v") is pronounced like /f/. So ...
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2answers
100 views

Should /l/ sound be always pronounced completely?

Normally, your tongue should touch the roof of your mouth when you pronounce the /l/ sound. The light /l/ sound and some of the dark /l/ sound, such as 'look', 'cancel', can be pronounced easily. But ...
0
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3answers
149 views

How are you supposed to pronounce “Fragile” [closed]

I usually say "Frah JI all" Some people say "Frah jell" Which way do you pronounce it? Which is the correct way?
14
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5answers
1k views

How do Torontonians pronounce the name of their hometown?

Toronto - The capital and largest city of Ontario, Canada, in the southern part of the province on Lake Ontario. [tə-ˈrän-(ˌ)tō, -ˈrän-tə] — Merriam-Webster [tuh-ron-toh] — Reference.com ...
4
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1answer
172 views

Difference between word-final iː, i and ɪ

As we know, English usually contrasts the two high front vowels /i:/ and /ɪ/, and many different minimal pairs exist for this (e.g. /sli:p/ vs /slɪp/). However, at the end of a word, we usually have ...
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2answers
121 views

How to spell the word 'trie'? [closed]

In computer science, there is a word trie. It is pronounced either /tri:/ or /trai/. However, according to the common spelling rule, "When two vowels go walking, the first one does the talking", the ...
1
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2answers
96 views

Why does child sometimes become a two-syllable word?

I have noticed, mostly in American English, that people sometimes say "child" as a two syllable word : Chi-ald. I wish i could represent this using phonetic symbols, but I'm bad at that, so please ...
1
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1answer
44 views

Accent on second syllable for “preference”

Dictionaries say that the word "preference" has got the accent on the first syllable. In a film the actor Jonny Lee Miller pronounced it with accent on the second syllable. It was not the first time ...
1
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1answer
86 views

How can I improve my pronunciation? [closed]

I've left high school and we don't study English at University and I feel that I haven't learnt to pronounce at all yet. What habits or routines can I do to speak better and fluent? Thank you so ...
1
vote
2answers
269 views

How do I pronounce the name “Aurelius”?

I was reading a book out-loud and came across this name. At the time, I pronounced it Aurelius: ur-ell-ee-us The more I think about it, the more I'm sure it is not correct. The word Aura would ...
0
votes
1answer
80 views

How is “viz.” pronounced?

How does one read out “viz.”? “Namely”, “to wit”, or something else entirely?
12
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5answers
2k views

“to bath” vs “to bathe”

Recently, I came across the verb to bathe written as bath in two Italian textbooks. The first time I saw it, I dismissed it as a typographical error and told my private student that the verb was ...
0
votes
1answer
77 views

Different pronunciation of the suffix '-ege-': 'allege' vs 'renege'?

1. What are some terms that relate to this phenomenon? I want to beware of similar cases. 2. What are the reasons?
0
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3answers
115 views

Verbally differentiating between “prince's” and “princess”

In Trondheim (Norway) we have a set of streets named after royal titles; Kongens Gate, Dronningens Gate, Prinsens Gate Directly translated, they mean "The King's Street", "The Queen's Street", "The ...
0
votes
2answers
145 views

Stress shift amongst speakers from India

I've noticed that speakers from India shift the stress in some words such as 'adjective', 'sentence' or 'tendency'. They normally stress the second syllable and not the first one as most people are ...
0
votes
1answer
71 views

How do you pronounce an obscure name like Kaiomi [closed]

Our company name is Kaiomi and it's actually a female name, although very very rare. We pronounce it ourselves as kayh-oh-mee, but we hear people say keyh-oh-mee for example.
1
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2answers
112 views

Pronunciation of file format GIF [closed]

While browsing the internet I found several cases in which people argue what is the correct way to pronounce .gif. There are two sides in this argument: People pronouncing it with a hard g as in ...
3
votes
2answers
249 views

How do you pronounce “ a ”

I'v heard this sentence " If you kiss a frog, it turns into a prince. " and the British announcer read this sentence like this If you kiss [ ɛɪ ] frog, it turns into [ ə ] prince Is there any ...
1
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4answers
211 views

Articles for filename extensions [closed]

When writing file extentions, (mainly on Ask Ubuntu) I write .txt or .avi. Should I write an .avi file or a .avi file? Because if I was to say it outloud, I would say a dot avi - but I am not sure ...
2
votes
1answer
197 views

Are vowels most often pronounced long or short?

English vowels can have two (or more, many more) different pronunciations: A : /eɪ/, mate or /ɑː/, mat E : /i:/, mete or /ɛ/, met I : /aɪ/, mite or /I/, mitt O : /oʊ/, mote or /ɒ/, moth U : ...
2
votes
3answers
344 views

Should 'g' followed by 'e' and 'i' be pronounced with a soft or hard g? [closed]

In English, words with a 'g' followed by a front vowel (e, i, y) can be pronounced with a soft g or a hard g: Words with Germanic roots are usually pronounced with a hard g: gear, get, gift, give ...
7
votes
1answer
348 views

Syllable — Phonetic Online List/Dictionary with word examples

Is there a homepage or online tool that gives you a list of, let's say, the 2000 most common syllables sorted by their international phonetic alphabet spelling? (e.g. /sɜː(r)/ = the first syllable ...
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3answers
212 views

Pronunciation of “-st-”. When is it “sd” and when “st”?

I recently found some words but I got confused and don't know whether to say sd or st. I am sure the following are pronounced as st: sister caster ancestor master But the following are pronounced ...
-1
votes
5answers
190 views

How to read “A = (πr)²” so as not to mistake it for “A = πr²” [duplicate]

None of the 26 answers given here, or the 5 answers given here mentions any similarity between the pronunciation of E = mc² and A = πr², yet I still remain confusioned as to what distinguishes the ...
0
votes
1answer
118 views

Pronunciation of “every body”, “every thing” etc. when written as two separate words

How shall I pronounce the words every body, every thing etc. when meaning everybody, everything, but written separately in the 19th century, like Jane Austen did? As two words, or as one? In the ...
2
votes
1answer
252 views

Linking or connected speech in reading English

I tried to read novel and could read every word correctly. But one thing that hindered me was the "connected speech or linking in English". I listened to the audio version of the book but as I ...
-1
votes
1answer
70 views

Why “Be quiet!” may sound as “Be quiets!” [closed]

I guess "(Everyone) Be quiet!" referring to a group of people is correct. But it may sound as "Be quiets!" when they yell. Is it correct?
0
votes
1answer
92 views

do you skip the a at the beginning of a word after a previous word ends in a consonant? [closed]

For example: All American => All Merican Automated analysis => Automated nalysis You get the idea?
36
votes
4answers
5k views

Why is ‘i’ in milk pronounced differently from ‘i’ in find?

As far as I know, in words of the structure CVCC, the vowel is usually short. Examples include milk, front, clamp, wasp, sport, etc. However, with some CC types, the vowel seems to always be long ...
2
votes
2answers
109 views

Pronunciation of “compact” across English dialects, when used as different parts of speech

Googling suggests that compact has the stress on the last syllable when used as an adjective and on the first syllable when used as a noun. Is this common for all English dialects or are there ...
2
votes
4answers
161 views

Phoneme glottalization in English dialects other than /t/?

I've done a bit of reading on t-glottalization, so I'm familiar with how it is used and its prevalence in English dialects. Are other phonemes or sounds similarly commonplace or widely used in ...
0
votes
1answer
49 views

Pronunciation of 'Arguable'

I know that the proper pronunciation of 'arguable' is /ɑr gju ə bəl/. I do not doubt. But it often bothers me when reading this word, that it somehow sounds like 'argu r able'. While not sure, I ...
1
vote
1answer
62 views

“An” used in place of “And”? [closed]

I'm baking a meatloaf an homemade mac an cheese for din din!!!!yummie!!! Explain the improper use of "an" in the above sentence. Shouldn't it be written as? : "I'm baking a meatloaf and making Mac ...
4
votes
1answer
184 views

Grocery Store Aisle

When speaking the phrase grocery store aisle, I leave the s in aisle silent. Are there any regional variations of English in which the s is not silent?
0
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3answers
986 views

How to do you pronounce Ouroboros?

When i first came across the name Ouroboros it was in Fullmetal Alchemist referring to the tattoos that the Homunculi, i was watching the Dub so it was pronounced in English as Or-Ro-Bo-Ros. However ...
0
votes
2answers
156 views

Pronunciation of “this year”

I'm listening (and watching) for some English podcasts, and sometimes I'm confused about pronunciation. Say, this one contains the phrase at the end: "I felt a moment of glory when I got high exam ...
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votes
2answers
89 views

Is it “a hemisphere” or “an hemisphere”? [duplicate]

Hemisphere begins with a silent h, like honest for example. The case of honest feels natural; a honest man simply sounds wrong. But hemisphere? I don't know if it is because I rarely use this word, ...
4
votes
2answers
518 views

Are what-cha and arent-cha examples of elision?

Are these words examples of elision? What effect do they create? If a child says them what does this suggest about their language development? Thanks for any help!!
2
votes
1answer
110 views

Original pronunciation of “kind” in “A little more than kin, and less than kind”

I'm wondering about the original pronunciation of "kind" in the famous line "A little more than kin, and less than kind" by Hamlet. Was it like "keend" or the present-day "kind"? If the great vowel ...
7
votes
4answers
505 views

Why do people often say 'hambag' for 'handbag'?

Edit The comments here are full of disbelievers! "I've never heard handbag pronounced that way. Which country are you from?" Oh ye of little faith! So - I've attached a couple of examples here ...
0
votes
2answers
176 views

I know “of” sounds like “ov”. Does “I've” sound like “If”?

I was studying connected speech and I read when we say for example I've finished my homework we pronounce the 've and f in finished as only one sound. Is it only in this case or whenever I ...
5
votes
4answers
505 views

Why is the 't' in 'nextdoor neighbour' usually silent? Where's the 't' in 'postman' gone? And why do people say 'guess book' for 'guest book'?

The words next-door neighbour and postdoc are nearly always said without a 't'. The Oxford Dictionary online gives the transcription as /pəʊs(t)ˈdɒk/, and the audio clearly says the word without a /t/ ...
1
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1answer
65 views

“Did I tell you what happened to him” pronunciation

Today, my American room mate was trying to tell me something and I had to ask him to repeat it three times until I guessed what his question was. It turns out he was saying "did I tell you what ...
0
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0answers
60 views

Does 'scent' have a silent 's' or a silent 'c?' [duplicate]

In the word "SCENT" which letter is silent "S" or "C".
2
votes
3answers
267 views

Words which are pronounced differently depending on where they are in the sentence

Is there a term for words which are pronounced differently depending on where they are in the sentence? For example, when I use the word "to" at the beginning or end of a sentence (or when I'm ...
1
vote
1answer
92 views

Learn Phonetics

As a non-native English speaker, I often search for the meaning of words on Google Search. Google provides the word's pronunciation in a written format. I do not understand how that written format is ...
0
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0answers
47 views

i vs. I in “pink” “ring”

I've always transcribed "pink" and "ring" with the vowel /I/ (lax) vs. the tense /i/, and my students have never argued with me about it, but suddenly I've been getting a good number of students ...