This tag is for questions about the sounds, intonation, and stress of how words are uttered or produced.

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0
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2answers
52 views

Do people really say “What is that mean” or it just sounds like that?

I often hear people saying something that sounds like "What is that mean" on TV and the Internet but I am wondering whether they really mean that or they actually say "What does it mean". If the ...
5
votes
2answers
758 views

How do Americans pronounce the 't' in “romantic”, “countable”, etc?

As for a 't' trapped between /n/ and a vowel, I've heard it pronounced in three different ways: Maybe the formal, standard way is to fully pronounce the /t/ sound: romantic: /roʊˈmæntɪk/ ...
3
votes
1answer
61 views

What dictates how new words should be pronounced? [closed]

Say the word 'libuv', which is a relatively new support library in computer programming. If I can't find any references on the web as to how it should be pronounced, how do I say it? And in general ...
6
votes
2answers
278 views

Are you googlable?

The search engine Google was launched in 1998 and on that same year, the term googling was first used. The verb “to google” earned its official status in the Oxford English Dictionary on June 15, ...
0
votes
0answers
42 views

Is Lana's “Yup!” a triphthong?

At some point in the Archer series, Lana starts saying very emphatic Yup!s. I was recently wondering about triphthongs and whether they occur in English, and found the Wikipedia entry had only a few ...
3
votes
0answers
60 views

Why is w considered a consonant? [duplicate]

I've always been taught that the character "w" in English was a consonant, except in very specific cases. However, on a recent trip to Wales, I learned that in Welsh it was considered a vowel. And ...
2
votes
1answer
84 views

Why do British people say Van Gough different than American people? [closed]

Americans say Van Go but British say it Van Goff
2
votes
0answers
66 views

How does this word sound to English-speakers? [closed]

I want to name my project with a word from Ukrainian language. Transliterating it would be spelled as Ostriv. And I'd like to be sure that it doesn't sound bad for English-speakers or isn't hard to ...
3
votes
1answer
81 views

How to pronounce “do you”, “would you” and their negative contractions

I don't know now how to pronounce phrases like "do you", "would you" and their negative contractions. For a while ago I though it's correct to pronounce "do/would you" (and even have [not] + V3) ...
6
votes
5answers
771 views

Do we pronounce a “t” sound in negative contractions “n't”

I'm faced with difficulties how to pronounce contractions like don't, wouldn't, and etc. correctly. Somehow I read from some grammar British student book that "t" is not pronounced but I didn't pay ...
2
votes
4answers
161 views

How to pronounce a superscript ə?

And why there's a superscript ə? just found this on the dictionary.cambridge.org ...
3
votes
1answer
67 views

What's the right prosody/pronunciation in “possessive + gerund” constructions?

From a previous post, I’ve seen that both (a) and (b) are acceptable, the difference lying in the register (formal vs colloquial) each sentence conveys. (a) She resented him being invited to open ...
0
votes
1answer
32 views

a ssl or an ssl? [duplicate]

I was talking about ssl somewhere, then I saw 'an ssl' was used on some other websites. For example, https://www.globalsign.com/en/ssl-information-center/what-is-an-ssl-certificate/ But SSL word ...
10
votes
1answer
125 views

Night rain vs Night train, gemination?

The Wikipedia article on gemination claims that gemination of /t/ is the distinguishing factor between the pronunciation of the two phrases night train and night rain. In my whole life, I've almost ...
1
vote
2answers
122 views

The pronunciation of “peripheral”

Some time ago, I heard the pronunciation of the word peripheral on a TV show (Brain Games, to be exact). Very surprised to hear /pəɹɪfəɹəl/, I asked two close relatives whether that was how the word ...
6
votes
1answer
117 views

The X in Xavier

The NOAD lists the pronunciation of Xavier as (ig)ˈzāvēər. In my own experience the parenthetical pronunciation is very common. I, however, do not know of any other x-initial words that are ...
4
votes
1answer
139 views

So, “carrots too” (/ˈkærəts tuː/) can sound like “Carrot Sue” (/ˈkærət suː/), right?

Look at this video at 1:09 (Source). The man said "carrots too" /ˈkærəts tuː/ but it sounds like he said /ˈkærət suː/. The /t/ got omitted completely. However, I don't see people omit /t/ in "stamp" ...
-1
votes
2answers
91 views

How to pronounce epitome? [closed]

I have always been pronouncing it as ye-pi-to-m. Usage Kala was considered the epitome(ye-pi-to-m) of success by her gym trainer after she lost 30 kgs in just 3 months. Is it not the case? ...
0
votes
0answers
38 views

Technique of pronouncing the rhotic “r”

I, as a German native speaker, have two "techniques" of pronouncing the rhotic "r." I describe them as follows: I move my tongue upward, so it touches the upper row of my teeth and then just make a ...
0
votes
1answer
24 views

Is there a standard for simplified pronunciation hints?

Often in introductory textbooks, new terms are introduced with a simplified pronunciation hint. For example, pharmaceutical (FAR-muh-sue-ti-kal) It's certainly not IPA or even the types of ...
2
votes
1answer
75 views

Differences between formal and colloquial English? [closed]

What are the basic differences between formal and colloquial English? Is it right that colloquial English uses more contracted forms, slang expressions, phrasal verbs, subjunctive, and euphemisms? ...
25
votes
8answers
2k views

Does anyone use both “whinge” and “whine?”

The words "whinge" and "whine" have separate (albeit very similar) definitions in the OED, and they have distinct pronunciations. "Whinge" seems completely restricted to BritE; I have never heard it ...
2
votes
1answer
51 views

clothing should be pronounced as /ˈkloʊ.zɪŋ/ or /ˈkloʊ.ðɪŋ/?

Ok, I checked up some dictionary and found that most dictionaries pronounce "clothing" as /ˈkloʊ.ðɪŋ/ Cambridge, Oxford, M-w However, when checking the voice, Cambridge & Oxford seem to ...
1
vote
1answer
41 views

Do we link (in speech) between 2 stressed words in a sentence?

Ok, see this word "good" /ɡʊd/ & this word "idea" /aɪˈdɪə/ Ok, now if we have a phrase "I have a good idea" /aɪ həvə ɡʊd aɪˈdɪə/, then which of the followings are right and which are wrong: ...
1
vote
1answer
31 views

Does /ðz/ create 1 sound or 2 separated sounds?

Look at this word "clothes" /kloʊðz/ (source ) To create the /ð/, the tip of the tongue has to be placed under the upper teeth & then release the air from your throat to your mouth so that the ...
10
votes
3answers
397 views

“penny LANE” vs “PENNY street” [duplicate]

Why do English speakers say "penny LANE" (emphasis on LANE) but would say "PENNY street" (emphasis on PENNY)?
2
votes
3answers
54 views

Pronunciation of iff

Do most of English speakers understand the word "iff" in text, and is there a standard pronunciation other than the full "if and only if"?
2
votes
2answers
76 views

Why is the past tense of text, as used by some people, pronounced “text-ted” and not just “tested”?

Why is the past tense of text, as used by some people, pronounced text-Ted and not just tested? One wouldn't say risk-ked for risked, or ask-ked for asked?
6
votes
1answer
210 views

“Carbine” rifle | is there pronunciation demographic data?

Let me count the ways: Car-bine (like: dine, refine, canine.) Car-bean (like: green bean, ravine, serpentine.) CAR-buhn (like: ..like the right and proper way to pronounce the scotch 'Oban'.) ...
2
votes
2answers
111 views

Roaming and Coming in William Shakespeare's O Mistress Mine

William Shakespeare's O Mistress Mine, Feste's song from Twelfth Night, seems to have the rhyming scheme AABCCB. However, the first two lines are problematic for that scheme with modern ...
1
vote
1answer
53 views

Is she speaking proper Cockney (or whatever it is she's imitating)?

At one point in Witness for the Prosecution, Marlene Dietrich's character is at some pains impersonating a guttersnipe. I've been told that the actress spent quite some time working on her accent for ...
3
votes
1answer
57 views

When does /tjʊ/ (Ex: Nice to meet you /miːt jʊ/) turn to /tʃʊ/ & /ʔjʊ/?

In this Wiki link, it said /tj/ could be pronounced as /tʃ/ So, Nice to meet you /... miːt jʊ/ will be /... miːtʃʊ/ But sometimes, I heard it as /... miːʔjʊ/ Watch this short youtube video, Freddie ...
1
vote
1answer
81 views

Identify English accent

My English teacher speaks, as far as I can tell as a native speaker of the German language, some really weird English. However, I'm not entirely sure if this is just my twisted perception or really a ...
2
votes
1answer
115 views

Are “lb” or “lbs” ever pronounced differently from “pound(s)”?

The “standard” pronunciation of lb or lbs is the same as for pound(s). However, given the nature of humans, I find it likely that in some slang a pronunciation based on the written word is used, ...
0
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0answers
22 views

How do I pronounce some possessive forms of words whose pronunciations end with s? [duplicate]

The examples come below. Sussex's Case's anus's How do I pronounce them?
0
votes
3answers
82 views

which is the different ea pronunciation : really /ideas/disappear/mean [closed]

a couple of my classmates and I had a discussion about which is the different word.Some said it's ideas, others said "mean". and as a follow up questions does the sound of "ea" change between ideas ...
1
vote
1answer
42 views

Which one of the following is the standard American accent of the word “badminton”: “/ˈbædˌmɪtn̩/” “/ˈbæd.mɪn.tən/”?

Ok, let check this word "badminton". In online Cambridge dictionary, it is pronounced as /ˈbæd.mɪn.tən/ Source In online Merrian-Webster dictionary, it is pronounced as /ˈbædˌmɪtn̩/ Source When ...
1
vote
1answer
60 views

Is Dick Schiller pronounced “shiller” or “skiller” in “Lolita”?

In Vladimir Nabokov's "Lolita," the title character's husband's name is Richard ("Dick") Schiller. Don't hold me to it, but I once heard a radio production (or it may have been a movie, not ...
4
votes
2answers
135 views

Can you hear the difference between 'Writer' and 'Rider'? Why?

Apologies in advance for the slightly blog-like nature of this question. The Background Some of the comments in relation to this question here: Unvoiced /dʒ/ and /ʒ/ in word final position ... ...
1
vote
0answers
54 views

In which vowel do the diphthongs [aʊ] and [aɪ] start?

Surfing the web, I found the following explanations on how to produce the diphthongs [aʊ] and [aɪ]: "/aʊ/ as in all the words of "How now brown cow!". The starting position is the vowel sound /æ/ as ...
3
votes
1answer
77 views

BrE: pronunciation of “to”

My wife is Guyanese and she tells me that in Guyana they are taught to pronounce "to" as an American would pronounce "toe." Guyana was a British colony (the most recent invaders) and their educational ...
2
votes
2answers
189 views

Unvoiced /dʒ/ and /ʒ/ in word final position

It seems to me that both /dʒ/ and /ʒ/ become voiceless (or almost) when they occur in word final position. Is this true? Examples: age, wage, courage, judge garage, sabotage, collage, mirage Does ...
5
votes
2answers
182 views

Strong /strɔːŋ/ → stronger /strɔːŋɡər/ - Why do we have to put an extra /g/ in front of /ər/? Is it a rule?

Ok, see this in the dictionary: Strong /strɔːŋ/ --> Stronger /strɔːŋɡər/ Why do we have to put an extra /g/ in front of /ər/? But "/sing" /sɪŋ/ & "/singer" /ˈsɪŋər/ do not adhere to that rule. ...
4
votes
2answers
76 views

Is there a specialised term for words that are almost always mispronounced?

With few exceptions, I hear people pronounce enmity emnity, Wednesday Wensday, and prerogative perogative. Is there a proper term for this phenomenon?
0
votes
0answers
44 views

Proper pronunciation of the short a

When I hear the "short a" vowel pronounced it doesn't seem as fronted as it should. (I'm talking about the vowel found in words such as bad, lamp, clam, crash, usually transcribed with /æ/ in the IPA, ...
0
votes
1answer
39 views

Why do they have a dot between a consonant and a vowel (ex “/ˈlɪm.ɪt/”) in dictionary.cambridge.org? [closed]

I often use dictionary.cambridge.org for checking the pronunciation and many times I found they used a dot between a consonant and a vowel (ex, limit "/ˈlɪm.ɪt/", or lemon /ˈlem.ən/). Other ...
0
votes
2answers
49 views

is the pronunciation of “secret” “/ˈsiːkrət/” or “/ˈsiːkrɪt/”?

I checked some dictionaries and clearly they are saying "/ˈsiːkrɪt/" but their IPAs are "/ˈsiːkrət/" Source 1: http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/secret Source 2: ...
1
vote
1answer
44 views

Why do some words change inflection when used differently?

Are there rules that determine if a word changes inflection depending on its part of speech? Some words seems to change inflection whether a noun or a verb, while others are pronounced the same. I ...
0
votes
0answers
54 views

The pronunciation of the definite article by American speakers

I was reading an article the other day and I came across an interesting passage: Notice that the weak form of the is typically [ði] before a vowel-initial word (the apple) but [ðə] before a ...
0
votes
1answer
59 views

How to pronounce 'question'

In all dictionaries the word question is pronounced as /ˈkwɛsʧən/, with ʧ symbolizing the sound ch in ti. I wanted to know if any phonological change happens when pronouncing the word in colloquial ...