This tag is for questions about the sounds, intonation, and stress of how words are uttered or produced.

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0
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0answers
23 views

Was “pronunshiation” ever a common pronunciation of “pronunciation”?

I came across an old prescriptive pronunciation guide from 1843 that says "pronunciation" ought to be pronounced "pronunshiation" (with /ʃi/ instead of /si/). The author says that the pronunciation ...
1
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0answers
100 views

Why does written English have more variations in pronunciation than other languages? [closed]

According to my experience, in languages like German, French, Chinese, Japanese, etc., there are not so many exceptions in pronunciation as in English. For example, given a word in German or French, ...
2
votes
0answers
82 views

How do I pronounce the combination of a regnal name/number and a dynasty name?

I know how to pronounce a regnal name with a regnal number after it, like Elizabeth I ("Elizabeth the First") or Charles IV ("Charles the Fourth"). But sometimes I see the regnal name/number followed ...
3
votes
1answer
202 views

How many syllables are in “orange”?

It seems whenever orange is spoken, it is spoken as one syllable. But it appears to be two. The Merriam-Webster online dictionary transcribes the pronunciation of orange as follows: \ˈär-inj, ...
2
votes
1answer
51 views

Pronunciation of single-syllable words ending in -ost

In Modern English, there are several monosyllabic words ending in -ost, like "most", "cost", "post", "lost", "frost". Assuming RP, some of them are pronounced with /əʊ/ (post) and others with /ɒ/ ...
0
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0answers
39 views

What are the stress patterns and intonation patterns in “wh” questions?

I have a few problems with stress and inotation when asking questions in English. For example Do we need to stress the question words like "where" "how" or "what"? what is the inotation pattern?
5
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1answer
135 views

How can I teach an English speaking person to say my name correctly (Kjetil) [closed]

I have a purely Norwegian name, Kjetil. It is old norse and means "kettle" or "helmet". A couple of times now, aquaintances and new friends have asked me in chat or person how my name is really ...
97
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10answers
19k views

Is there any word in English where “th” sounds like “t+h”?

It might be a strange question, but I, as a non-native speaker (Pakistani), have listened to English pronunciations by my native people who have over time developed their own pronunciations. So, I ...
0
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0answers
20 views

Friday pronunciation [duplicate]

How is Friday pronounced? A friend of mine says "fry-deeh" but I've always heard it as "fry-day". Is it an accent?
0
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3answers
61 views

Is there a difference in pronunciation between grandma and grammar? [closed]

? Also is there a difference between morning and moaning? Assuming British as spoken in London ("Jafaican") but also interested in other dialects
2
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1answer
83 views

Does everyone in the U.S. (and beyond?) pronounce “Buick” with the Spanish B/V, or is this a regional thing?

There's a long and dry story to this, so I'll just get to the point and ask the question: Does everyone in the U.S. (and beyond?) pronounce the beginnng of the word "Buick" with the "Spanish" ...
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2answers
85 views

Why does “everyone” pronounce “spigot” as “spicket”? [closed]

There are many words that are commonly mispronounced, such as "recurring" being pronounced as "re-occurring," but that one at least has some logic to it, as something that is recurring is, in fact, ...
5
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1answer
78 views

Can native English speaker tell the differences between [ɣ] voiced velar fricative and [g] voiced velar stop?

We dont have [g] in Vietnamese so I use [ɣ] instead. I wonder if it is acceptable since I can't tell the difference between them. And it seems like that native speaker cant distinguish the voiceless ...
0
votes
3answers
62 views

How to understand the pronunciation of informal English? [closed]

I moved to English speaking country a while ago. I always thought that my English is pretty well in both speaking and listening (understanding) parts. I understand 100% what is being said for ...
3
votes
2answers
142 views

the weak form of 'on'

I am confused at whether or not there is a weak form at preposition's 'ON'. I've checked at some dictionaries at Cambridge and Oxford dictionary, they don't mention on the weak form's pronunciation. ...
0
votes
4answers
119 views

How to position the tip of the tongue when pronouncing /s/ & /z/?

This website says, when making /s/ & /z/ sound, the tip of the tongue should be close to the upper backside of the top front teeth. But this video says, when making /s/ & /z/ sound, the tip ...
1
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0answers
89 views

“In front of” pronunciation [closed]

In the Taylor Swift's song "Red" I heard "in fronning you" for what was supposed to be "in front of you." Why do some people pronounce it like "in fronning you"? I also don't know how I should ...
2
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1answer
98 views

Why is “appreciate” pronounced as though the “c” is an “sh”?

Why is it that "appreciate" is pronounced as though it were "appreshiate?"
0
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1answer
48 views

Pronunciation of words ending with “-tion” [duplicate]

As far as I can recall there are just a few words in the English language which end with the spelling -tion after an 'S' which have a pronunciation ending as 'chan'. But in South Asia, 99% of the ...
2
votes
1answer
108 views

What's the rule for pronouncing “’s” as /z/ or /s/?

Is there a hard rule for what sound the 's makes? In words like John's, Dave's, man's, lord's, etc. it makes a /z/ sound, but in words like that's, it's, ship's, poet's, etc., it makes an /s/ sound.
1
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2answers
2k views

The difference between ''cringy'' and ''cringey'' [closed]

Can anyone explain to me the difference between these two words? I looked up them in a dictionary but I find the both meanings to be quite similar. Also, is there any difference in their ...
3
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2answers
97 views

Is there a rule for the position of the accent (stressed sound) in words ending with -ative?

For example, can declarative be pronounced similar to declaration for the accent (stressed sound)? I thought before that sometimes the position of the "accent", or the stressed sound of a word, ...
1
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1answer
44 views

linking s/z and y

I realize some native speakers will create a new sound when linking s/z and y [j]. For example: Miss you = [mɪʃuː] "mishu" As you = [/æʒuː] "azhu" Is it okay if I just say [mɪsjuː] for "miss you" ...
0
votes
1answer
67 views

Pronunciation of “to”

After doing some research, I have noticed I have been saying the word "to" as [tʃu:], while most dictionaries and sources say I should pronounce it as [tu:]. But I have the impression that "to" is not ...
0
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0answers
38 views

Can the “t” letter be uttered as a flap t before the letter “h”?

I know the flap-t is usually used when the "t" is between vowels or between an "r" and a vowel, but I think I can also hear it betwenn vowels and the "h". And I noticed the same with the "g" I think. ...
1
vote
1answer
62 views

How to pronounce the stop-t

could somebody tell me how would a native american pronounce the stop-t in the following sentences? -It would be nice to meet her. -I've got you. -Right now. I learned that we should bring our ...
1
vote
1answer
88 views

Words rhyming with “ear” pronounced with the vowel as in “eat”?

For words like ear, year, hear etc., most dictionaries only give the pronunciation /-ɪr/ (with the vowel as in the word it). But I think some native speakers pronounce them /-ir/ (with the vowel as in ...
1
vote
0answers
73 views

How do the British pronounce these names? [closed]

Leif, as in Leif Ericsson; Elise, I know the British pronounce Denise like "dih-'neez"; Gisele; and Gisela
1
vote
2answers
123 views

Why is the word watch pronounced differently from words like patch, latch, match, catch, and batch?

Why doesn't watch rhyme with catch, batch, latch, patch, and match?
1
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0answers
39 views

Could you Clarify the Front - Back & Close - Open position & other positions in between in IPA vowel chart?

See the IPA vowel chart A front vowel is any in a class of vowel sound used in some spoken languages. The defining characteristic of a front vowel is that the tongue is positioned as far in ...
0
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1answer
72 views

First or second syllable accent for “tarot”

Is it acceptable to pronounce "tarot" with the accent on the second syllable? So, phonetically it would be pronounced "Ta-ROW." My own online research showed me that there were maybe one or two times ...
0
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1answer
102 views

How do native English speakers pronounce these Vietnamese words “Le” & “Bo”?

I am Vietnamese & If I see "Le" & "Bo" I will pronounce them as /le/ & /bo/. But seem English doesn't have any /e/ or /o/ as a phoneme. A phoneme /ˈfoʊniːm/ is one of the units of sound ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

Am I thinking right about “Front”, “Near-Front”, “Central”, “Near-Back”, “Back” position of IPA vowel chart?

See this Standard IPA Vowel chart Source I am confused of the "Front", "Near-Front", "Central", "Near-Back", "Back" position of the tongue. If you draw a straight line from the position ...
4
votes
3answers
120 views

Could you clarify /e/ and /ɛ/?

This is quite confused! In the Standard IPA Vowel chart, there are /e/ and /ɛ/, see the bellowed picture (Source) However, many American English Vowel charts don't have /e/. So, I think that Some ...
0
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1answer
137 views

Is there any word in English that has the vowel “o” stands alone without any other vowel standing next to it?

See this picture (Source) See the vowel "o" I couldn't find any word in English dictionary that has vowel "o" stands alone without any other vowel standing next to it. Let say, I can see /ɡoʊ/ ...
0
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0answers
45 views

How do you tell the difference between “wrong” and “run” in perception test?

Background Just developing a linguistic test - native English speakers can pass(100% correct), and L2 learners cannnot pass(even though they are very proficient). "Wrong vs run" pair was chosen. ...
2
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1answer
99 views

Yod dropping - Why is there a distinction in the pronunciations of “sewn” and “hewn”?

"Sewn" is pronounced /sōn/, whereas "hewn" is pronounced /hyo͞on/. Is there a reason for the difference in their pronunciations despite their spellings and origins being similar?
8
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2answers
444 views

What source explains the different pronunciations of “hol” in “alcohol” and “hollow”?

According to Merriam-Webster, the pronunciation of alcohol is "ˈal-kə-ˌhȯl" while the pronunciation of hollow is "ˈhä-(ˌ)lō." Why are they pronounced with different vowels? I think I've figured out ...
1
vote
1answer
141 views

Words pronounced with stress patterns like in “politics”, “lunatics”, etc.?

Could anyone please give a list of words pronounced with no primary stress immediately preceding the suffix -ic, such as in "politics", "lunatic", "arithmetic"? Also, is there an absolute stress ...
11
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2answers
3k views

Isn't a “gonner” or “gonna” slang for a person about to die?

(I think this "blank" moment of mine is what is called in AmEng a brain fart, so be it) Isn't ‘a gonner/gonna’ slang for a person who is about to die? It's said in situations where, potentially, ...
7
votes
1answer
171 views

How do you pronounce “bald”?

I've always heard it pronounced /bɒld/ (rhymes with scald, for those of you who don't know IPA), however the dictionary and some of my friends say /bɔ:ld/ (rhymes with mauled). I'm British, by the ...
1
vote
1answer
57 views

Pronunciation of luxury

Is there a reason that Americans now pronounce luxury "lugsury" instead of "lucshury" while still pronouncing "extract" and "extra" with the more common "x" sound?
0
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1answer
75 views

Pronounciation of “string”

According to Wiki "string" is pronounced as /stɹɪŋ/. However, all of my acquaintances have split opinions about the 'g' at the end. I'm of a mind that the 'g' is pronounced, e.g. two strings, not two ...
1
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0answers
55 views

Phonograms ey and ie

My son is using Spalding phonogram cards in his kindergarten class. I like them for the most part, aside from a few weird examples and explanations that aren't quite right, but that I can live with. ...
3
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0answers
100 views

How do New Yorkers pronounce “oil”? [closed]

There's a list of "New York" words and phrases that's been surfacing on the Web periodically for quite a few years. Not all New Yorkers speak like that, I assure you. Only barely-above-the-gutter ...
0
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0answers
24 views

why “come into a place” sounds like /kʌməntsə/ /pleis/

Two sentences from 60-Second Science Now a study finds that a teacher's racial biases come into play in different ways for high-achieving kids versus low-performing ones. While listening to music, ...
0
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1answer
47 views

Tawkin'? Tawk? I don't get the joke

from Tom Wolfe's The Bonfire of the Vanities: "I'll think a something. Half a my practice consists of talking to people who are not anxious to talk." Tawk. Killian leaned forward and said, ...
4
votes
2answers
392 views

Since when has “J” been sounding like [dʒ] and no longer “Y” [duplicate]

There are words that have "j" where in most languages it would be pronounced like romaji "y". Take for example "Jesus", "Jehovah", "John". It should be pronounced "Yesus", "Yehovah", "Yohn". Slavic ...
2
votes
1answer
103 views

Why does Tom Hanks pronounce “stupid” as “st-you-pid” in “The Bonfire of the Vanities”?

This may or may not related to my previous question. In this movie (which is based on another one of Tom Wolfe's novels, The Bonfire of the Vanities, Tom Hanks plays the lead character who is an Ivy ...
3
votes
1answer
77 views

Pronouncing “found” as “fyound”: why?

I had a teacher in high school who spoke like that, and an elderly neighbor: both women. When I first read Tom Wolfe's novel A Man in Full, I ran across this passage: "You must be Mr. DeCyasi," ...