This tag is for questions about the sounds, intonation, and stress of how words are uttered or produced.

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0
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1answer
52 views

What do they say in a linked video? (5 words)

A video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vUVvDM0tIjU Now parts I'm not getting: 0:21 'till my father was (?). I've been so (?) for quite...' 2:09 '...a shift from (?) enlighting to...' 2:21 ...
1
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3answers
49 views

How do you pronounce ACoA? [closed]

How should I pronounce ACoA - the acronym standing for Adult Children of Alcoholics?
1
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0answers
84 views

Is effect pronounced as /ɪˈfekt/ or as /əˈfekt/?

This page ( https://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/american_english/effect ) lists it as /əˈfekt/ for American English, but when you click on the pronounce button it is pronounced as /ɪˈfekt/. ...
3
votes
2answers
164 views

Should the IPA of the word “conscious” be /ˈkɑːnʃəs/ or /ˈkɑːntʃəs/?

Ok, see the word "conscious" has the IPA /ˈkɑːnʃəs/ in the Oxford Learner's Dictionary However, when you listen clearly, you will feel like it should be /ˈkɑːntʃəs/ not /ˈkɑːnʃəs/. So it should read ...
-1
votes
1answer
36 views

Might use help transcribing a sentence

Could someone please help me with the following: What are man's words from 1:13 time mark to 1:16 in this video: How Were the Pyramids Built? I'm making subtitles for that video, so I'd really like ...
0
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0answers
37 views

Has there ever been “ 'tis ” in AmE?

'Tis which is the contraction of it is. I heard it was contracted due to the way it's pronounced--the accent; because the accent is at the T. So, just wondering if AmE uses this 'tis, where T's tend ...
1
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1answer
34 views

Pronounciation of “neusis”

The ancient Greek "neusis" technique basically means the use of a a straightedge with two marked points on it; as is well known with such a device, in addition to the usual Euclidean tools, one can ...
6
votes
2answers
249 views

Why do we say “archenemy” differently from “archangel” and “architecture”?

Like other words that start with "arch-", archenemy is partly derived from arkhi or arkhos from the Greek (Wikipedia), meaning chief. But why is it said differently, using a "ch" sound, from ...
0
votes
0answers
73 views

Pronunciation of “Personally” and “Finally”

I always hear people say "personly" and "finely" instead of "personally" and "finally" when they speak. I wonder whether this reduction can apply to other words ending with "-nally"? Just like ...
1
vote
1answer
102 views

Pronunciation Dilemma

How acceptable/appropriate is the pronunciation of words such as "Christian" and "fortune"/"fortunate" with a [t] sound as opposed to [ʃ]? I personally prefer the former but I believe that it's not ...
1
vote
2answers
92 views

Did I hear rightly – “Shiite Houthis are stated in to return the President to office.”

The answer would be very likely "No." I’ve been listening to AP Radio news, and heard the news of May 15 reporting the outcome of cease-fire negotiation between Saudi-led forces and Shiite Houthis as ...
9
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5answers
2k views

Why is “meta” pronounced differently to “beta”? [closed]

Is there an etymological explanation to this? Why is "meta" pronounced ˈmɛtə while "beta" is pronounced ˈbeɪtə or ˈbiːtə? (Pronunciations taken from Cambridge Dictionaries Online)
0
votes
1answer
57 views

Should I use the weak or the strong form in this sentence for the word “as”?

"Went straight up as if from a factory" <---- for the word "as" in this sentence should I say it like /æz/ or like /əz/ ?
1
vote
0answers
56 views

Exaggerating the pronunciation of a vowel or consonant

Is there a word for exaggerating the pronunciation of a vowel or consonant by holding it longer than normal? When conveying this in writing, does it fall in the same category as an accent or dialect ...
1
vote
0answers
63 views

Why are these spellings pronounced “non phonetically?”

In Anglo English, the word ewe (female sheep) is pronounced "you," rather than, say, "e-weh." Likewise, the surname Ewell, is pronounced "yule," rather than "e-well." Why is that?
6
votes
2answers
107 views

Winged or Wingèd?

Okay.. here is the problem: In a certain story I am writing, I have a place called the "Winged Lion Inn" which serves as a locus for several story-related events. I have a friend that insists it ...
3
votes
1answer
139 views

Are there rules for pronunciation of words ending in “-ton”?

Here are 4 words ending in "_ton": Proton - /ˈprəʊ.tɒn/ Cotton - /ˈkɑt.n̩/ Mutton - /ˈmʌtn̩/ Wanton - /ˈwɒntən/ Even though the words end in -ton, the pronunciation varies. ...
2
votes
1answer
73 views

Pronunciation of “I'm going to” - Part 2

This question is a further question regarding my previous thread.(Pronunciation of "I'm going to") Thank you for everyone who answered this question. I read that saying "I muh-nuh" (eg. ...
3
votes
2answers
184 views

Pronunciation of “I'm going to”

I'm not a native English speaker but I've recently moved to the US. I've been noticing that when people say "I'm going to" (or I'm gonna), a lot of people here always pronounce it like "I muh-nuh", so ...
-1
votes
1answer
98 views

Mischievous pronounced (mis-CHEEV-ee-us) [closed]

I'm getting sick of hearing some people pronouncing the word mischievous (mis-CHEEV-ee-us) when there's no I between the V and the O. It's a three-syllable word pronounced (MIS-chiv-us). Why do some ...
4
votes
2answers
294 views

Is there any English word starting with “gh” and “gh” is not pronounced as /ɡ/?

Gh is a digraph in English (and in some other languages). In English, you can see it at the beginning, in the middle and at the end of the word. If ⟨gh⟩ is not at the beginning of the word, it is ...
1
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0answers
86 views

Is there such a thing as a “hard” D and a “soft” D sound? [closed]

Such as in graduation? Is that a soft D like it would be for vowels?
1
vote
2answers
59 views

'What are you' and 'what do you': same pronunciation in AmE…?

The ELL question Do Americans pronounce 'are' as 'do' in 'what are waiting for?' brought to my attention something I've not noticed before. In normal conversational (or faster) speech, it seems What ...
2
votes
1answer
117 views

Why are “suffice” and “sufficient” pronounced so differently?

Today I heard somebody use a form of the verb "suffice" (which means "to be sufficient") pronouncing it like the verb "surface" without an r (and where that "a" makes more of an "i" sound). This ...
0
votes
2answers
72 views

'Falcon' or 'Fall-con'

I'd appreciate a native speaker's opinion on this. Dictionaries list both pronunciations to be correct. falcon Pronunciation: BrE /ˈfɔːlkən/ ; NAmE /ˈfælkən/ However, I have heard ...
-2
votes
1answer
104 views

Pronunciation for the word “competent.”

I hope that some of you might be able to quell this dilemma of mine. I would like to know the British pronunciation for the word "competent." Is it pronounced as: "com-pɪ-tent" or "com-pə-tent" with ...
-2
votes
1answer
61 views

Specifically, what makes some words harder to spell, pronounce, and remember?

Edit: I apologize if my question lacks research effort, and is neither clear nor useful. Perhaps if you could tell me why this is in conjunction with your downvote, the quality of my post might be ...
2
votes
2answers
55 views

Does the word “buttress,” which is both a noun & verb, follow the rules about where to put emphasis based on its part of speech? [closed]

buttress (n.) any prop or support buttress (v.) to support by a buttress; prop up Words like combat, abstract, project, and convict change the syllable that's stressed based on whether ...
1
vote
2answers
95 views

How to pronounce “p” in “hospital” and why?

I've pronounced "p" in "hospital" as "p" for many years and just noticed that some people pronounced it as "b". Please refer to http://dictionary.cambridge.org/pronunciation/british/hospital and ...
0
votes
2answers
82 views

UK English pronunciation of word “language” please?

What is the correct British English pronunciation of the word language please? Throughout my education in New Zealand and South Africa the first g was a soft sound as in bang? Here in Australia, on ...
0
votes
4answers
199 views

How should one spell the sound “eye” when creating a word?

How can I invent a word (or name) containing the sound "ai" (sounds like "eye") so that an English-speaker is likely to guess the correct pronunciation based on spelling alone, with no outside ...
1
vote
1answer
80 views

Pronunciation of the words “clothes” and “February” in American English

What is the correct pronunciation of the words "clothes" and "February" in the American English? A lot of people pronounce "clothes" as /kloʊz/, dropping the 'th', as for "February", I hear that the ...
0
votes
2answers
66 views

Is it common to pronounce 'only' as 'own-knee'?

I personally find it very hard to pronounce the 'L' sound right after 'N'. Would you say it is quite common or at least understandable to pronounce 'only' as 'own-knee' (fastly)?
2
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0answers
51 views

I`m just curious about how to speak “anti-” is correct? [closed]

I`m just curious about how to speak "anti-" is correct? it`s like ant/ai/ or ant/i/??
0
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0answers
35 views

How to pronounce Isabirra (type of cheese)?

Isabirra is a type of cheese. http://www.cheese.com/isabirra/ I couldn't find a source of its pronunciation. Can anybody help me with its pronunciation (in the most layman form). Thanks
2
votes
2answers
122 views

Pronunciation of diphthongs in English

I found a few similar questions, but none of them gave me the answer to this. I'm a native Serbian, so I have problems understanding diphtongs, because Serbian has none of them. Serbian has only five ...
7
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1answer
140 views

Pronunciation of Korea and Career

Are the pronunciations of the two words identical? Korea v.s. Career
0
votes
1answer
77 views

Word Stress Within the Phrase I'm expecting someone

I tried pronouncing the phrase: "I'm expecting someone". Phonetically it looks like: [aɪm ɪkspɛkt ɪŋ sʌmwʌn] I perceive some stress on the second syllable of expecting and the first syllable of ...
7
votes
1answer
217 views

Is the pronunciation of “oa” in “broad” unique?

The "oa" in the word "broad" is pronounced like the words "or" or "awe". In phonetic symbols that is ɔː . However in all other examples I can think of it is pronounced like the "oe" in "toe". Or in ...
2
votes
2answers
165 views

Pronunciation of double G: soft “gg” versus hard “gg”

When I was a student, I was taught double G is normally hard, as in "agglomerate", "aggregate", "foggy", "aggressive", "dagger", "trigger", "niggard", "doggerel", etc, the exceptions being ...
3
votes
0answers
166 views

How to pronounce the Polish name “Aronszajn” [closed]

Nachman Aronszajn was an American mathematician born in Poland. I will make a talk (in English) on a subject for which I would like to cite some of his works. But since I am not a native ...
0
votes
0answers
47 views

Pronunciation of Who is it?

I heard the question "Who is it?" in a movie. [Person A] knocked on a door. [Person B] came to open the door, but before that he asks "Who is it?" This three syllables question can be pronounced ...
0
votes
1answer
66 views

Stress and intonation in “I'm proud of you”

When I pronounce the phrase: "I'm proud of you" to communicate that I'm proud of the person I'm talking to, do I only need to stress the word "proud" a bit? I think that stressing the pronouns "I" ...
3
votes
1answer
90 views

T- and D-flapping when at start of word preceded by vowel

It seems to me that the "d" is flapped in "I don't know" in American English. Am I right? If I am, I'm wondering if t/d is always flapped at the begining of the word when it is preceded by a vowel? ...
2
votes
2answers
612 views

A term for words that change pronunciation with part of speech

I'm talking about words like: construct: CON-struct(n.), cun-STRUCT(v.) present: PRE-sent(n.), pre-SENT(v.) record: RE-cord(n.), ri-CORD(v.) They are pronounced differently based on whether they ...
1
vote
2answers
249 views

Ma'am: Is it as in “ham” solely for the Queen, whilst it remains spoken “ma”+“um” (less any glotal stop) for all others?

It's become conventional wisdom that, when addressing the Queen after introduction, one must be sure to address her as "ma'am" as if it were to rhyme with "ham". Only "ma'am" and "ham" don't rhyme. ...
0
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0answers
118 views

Words with primary and secondary stress in a phrase

In the phrase "I'm in the same situation" the word "situation" phonetically looks like: [ˌsɪtʃ uˈeɪ ʃən] The first syllable of the word has secondary stress and the third syllable has primary ...
0
votes
1answer
102 views

How is the letter “Z” pronounced in Indian English?

How is the letter "Z" pronounced in Indian English? I assumed that Indian English is more similar to British English than to American English, and therefore would pronounce it "Zed". But I came ...
1
vote
1answer
62 views

How would a speaker of English vocalize W'soran, a sci-fi/fantasy conlang word, taking into consideration that some languages are unpronounceable? [closed]

There is a character in the Warhammer Fantasy universe by the name of W'soran. I've never been sure how to pronounce his name. He's from an Egyptian type culture. Could anyone tell me if they think ...
0
votes
1answer
79 views

The NG sound in casual American speech

I read somewhere (I don't remember the source and I'm not sure if it's true) that Americans tend to replace the "ng" sound with only "n" in casual/fast speech. For example: Who's calling? sounds like ...