This tag is for questions about the sounds, intonation, and stress of how words are uttered or produced.

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15
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5answers
7k views

What would be the onomatopoeia for “spit”?

Just wanted to know how to write in a chat room the sound for "spit". As in "meow" for the sound that a cat makes, what would you write for the sound of the verb "spit"? (Google wasn't very helpful, ...
0
votes
0answers
59 views

a flap in “video”

I asked here recently about a word "oratory". Somebody told me there is no flap in American English, because a t is before a stressed vowel (second stress). It's right. But why there is no flap in "...
1
vote
1answer
100 views

Stress pattern of “trust me”

Are the words "Trust me" equally stressed? The vowel in the word "me" is a bit more tense (like in meet) I think. It's a two syllable phrase: [trʌst mi]
2
votes
1answer
970 views

Why is “viva” pronounced `/ˈvaɪ.və/` in the academic sense?

Usually, (and intuitively), the word is pronounced /ˈviː.və/ or /ˈviː.vɑ/ However, I recently learned that in the academic context, the same term is pronounced /ˈvaɪ.və/. Why is this the case, and ...
4
votes
1answer
131 views

American English: Can you

when the question "Can I help you?" is pronounced it sounds like "Can I" is reduced to "knai". It's short and quick, but the verb 'help' is stressed, the voice goes up at the end of the question. It's ...
1
vote
2answers
302 views

Word stress with noun and negative + noun

I have two sentences: I'm in a hurry. [aɪm_ɪn_ə ˈhɜri] I'm not in a hurry. [aɪm nɑd_ɪn_ə ˈhɜri] I linked the words together (consonant + vowel). I use the flap T in the second sentence (I marked ...
4
votes
1answer
300 views

how to properly use “that that” so as a listener/reader/speaker can comprehend the entire sentence without complication?

Be it either whilst writing or reading, I've not come by an easy way to comprehend the use of the 'that that' lexical ambiguity, taking into account that improper use of punctuation is not the issue. ...
2
votes
2answers
276 views

Is it true that only unstressed words in a sentence, which have H at the beginning of the words, will be dropped in American English?

Is it true that only unstressed words in a sentence, which have H at the beginning of the words, will be dropped in American English? Off course, these H words will not be the beginning of the ...
0
votes
1answer
122 views

So called “tap”, or “nap”

I'm interested in so called "tap" in american English. I've read a tap occurs in a word "twenty". I've heard this word in the internet and I've noticed a t is not pronounced or is pronounced simply as ...
-1
votes
1answer
360 views

Position of stress in English words derived from New Latin

In another thread on this site a question was asked about the pronunciation of the word Caribbean; that discussion focused on the position of the accent. Cognate forms of the word Caribbean have ...
1
vote
2answers
482 views

Is the diphthong [ai] on a non-primary stressed syllable a hypercorrection? [closed]

Is the diphthong [ai] on a non-primary stressed syllable a hypercorrection? Some American people pronounce the prefix "anti" like an-tie. For example, here's a pronunciation of "anti-Christian" http:/...
1
vote
1answer
266 views

Should British r be spoken out in liaison?

For example, the r in "better" is not pronounced in British English. How about the "r" in "a better idea"?
0
votes
3answers
249 views

Or, Ore, Awe and Oar [closed]

Does everyone pronounce these the same way? (I mean all 4 words - not American vs. English)
0
votes
2answers
297 views

How to pronounce Smith's

s following th is really hard for me. My tongue is never fast enough. I wonder if there is any reduction here. How do you pronounce it?
2
votes
3answers
107 views

Is the stress necessary on Don't in Don't mention it

the phrase "Don't mention it" phonetically looks like [ doʊnt ˈmɛn ʃən_ɪt ] I think the primary stress is on the second syllable "ˈmɛn". Am I right? But my question is, is it important to add any ...
0
votes
1answer
149 views

American English word stress What time is it?

In the question "What time is it?" we only stress the noun "time". Am I right? The "is it" part at the end is unstressed. Right? I'm not sure if the word "what" needs secondary stress or not. I need ...
0
votes
1answer
132 views

Pronunciation of a double C [closed]

I always pronounce words like "accelerate" and "eccentric" as "asselerate" or "eesentric". I don't know why but the "ks" that I hear in common pronunciation irks me. Is it correct to pronounce the c's ...
2
votes
4answers
949 views

How to pronounce miracle?

I ask this because I recently had a debate with my family about how to pronounce this word, miracle. They said it was pronounced with the "mir" in miracle the same way "mir" is in mirror. (/ˈmɪɹəkəl/)....
1
vote
0answers
226 views

Is a syllable defined phonetically or etymologically?

Reading recent postings about syllables I've been struck and baffled by talk of the possibility that words may have a different number of syllables when they are written than when they are spoken. Is ...
1
vote
0answers
77 views

Is “church” one syllable or two? [duplicate]

I read like twenty years ago that the word "church" (clutch, hatch, match) is undoubtedly one syllable when written but that an argument can be made that it's two syllables -- CHUR-ch -- when spoken. ...
4
votes
2answers
284 views

American English Word Stress Last Content Word

I read that as a general rule, the last content word of a phrase gets the most stress. So, in the sentence "I'm late" late will get the most stress. Now if we add the word "Sorry" at the beginning of ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

Why do some people pronounce “singer” as “singGer”?

I teach English to elementary students in Korea. One day, I noticed an African American female teacher pronounce the word,"singer" differently- "sinGer" , a strong G-sound. Is it common in America? ...
0
votes
3answers
4k views

How to pronounce (OS X) Yosemite in Australian English

In Australian English, is (OS X) Yosemite pronounced to rhyme with "vegemite", or the same as in Yosemite Sam, who is named after the national park?
3
votes
0answers
234 views

Spelling of one syllable changes pronunciation of another [closed]

I've been fascinated by word pronunciations where changing the spelling of one syllable doesn't change its pronunciation, but rather changes another syllable in the word. The only two examples I can ...
4
votes
3answers
1k views

Any example of when one would pronounce the word “a” with a long A sound?

I am trying to think of any example when one might be correct in pronouncing the word "a" with a long A sound. With the word "the," one would use the long E sound only when the word is followed by a ...
2
votes
2answers
387 views

The pronunciation of ending “s”

I know the rule of pronouncing s at the end of words(plural nouns and singular verbs) that if s follows a voice sound(d, l, etc.), it will be pronounced as /z/ sound. For example, "words" is ...
0
votes
1answer
677 views

How to pronounce Netflix's?

An article http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-30932399 on the BBC website, regarding apps not being available for Blackberry phones has the following As an example, he said, this "discrimination"...
0
votes
1answer
202 views

Do we append consonants when linking words?

How should in an instant be spoken? [ɪ nə nɪn.stənt] [ɪn nən nɪn.stənt] If we use second version, then we append [n] before [ən] and before [n.stənt]. How do I correctly link words together when ...
-1
votes
1answer
61 views

Why does this video say that /aɪ/ is to glide from /ɑ/ to /i/?

look at this video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mjYVGAKQMdI It said that to pronounce /aɪ/, we need to glide from /ɑ/ to /i/ /i/ long /ɪ/ short In the above video, they don't teach /a/ sound ...
-1
votes
2answers
155 views

Saying a word in a way that describes its meaning

Is there an English term that is used when one says a word in a way that somewhat describes what it means? For example "Peter was really ANGRY at you Damien!"... Here, large emphasis would be placed ...
0
votes
1answer
497 views

Is an American “r” sound retroflexed or retracted? [duplicate]

Ok, there are two different ways to make the American r sound. They both think they are right and that the other is wrong. Make the r sound by retroflexing the tongue: Make the r sound by ...
-1
votes
1answer
181 views

How do you pronounce “the Jones'”

How do you pronounce "the Jones'"? as it pertains to the following: "Mr. Jones and the rest of his family enjoyed the party, therefore the Jones' plans for another party were eagerly anticipated."
0
votes
1answer
232 views

How to pronounce Alois in A Dog of Flanders? [closed]

The e-book I have downloaded from Amazon has Alois, but Wikipedia seems to have Aloise. I do not know which one is correct in the first place. I shall assume Alois is the correct one. A Dog of ...
0
votes
2answers
344 views

Must the tongue contact the alveolar ridge anteriorly in order to pronounce /t/ properly?

Some textbooks teach that when making the t sound, the front and sides of the tongue contact the alveolar ridge anteriorly and laterally. However, I feel very uncomfortable if I do that when ...
0
votes
2answers
191 views

is it possible to raise the tip while raising the back and lowering the center of the tongue when making /R/ sound?

Following this video, this is how we correctly make the r sound: Let the throat vibrate since it is voiced. Round the lip a little. Raise the tip of the tongue towards the hard bump behind the upper ...
1
vote
3answers
5k views

Confusion of the pronunciation of Dark “L” consonant sound?

Dark "L": is "L" at the end of the word or after a vowel sound. Example: ball, pull. Light "L:: is "L" at the beginning or before a vowel sound. Example: light, love. There are 4 explanations of how ...
3
votes
1answer
188 views

The word “mine”: Anyone else use a velar nasal /maiŋ/ for “belongs to me” meaning, but still /main/ for “explosive”/“coal mine”?

I think I naturally distinguish these words: mine (ie "belongs to me") /maiŋ/ mine (ie "explosive" or "coal mine") /main/ I vaguely remember noticing this years ago, but I was only just reminded of ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

Is Standard American Accent an old British Accent before 17th century?

I heard that American accent is like British accent before 17th Century. About 17th century, in Britain, there was a movement of changing the accent, which creates a new Standard British accent (...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

how do you pronounce URL?

When pronouncing URL, I say (roughly) "you-are-ell." A colleague insists that (roughly) "earl" is more common. Is there a widely accepted pronunciation? Within the computer world or without?
1
vote
3answers
327 views

Older and Odor - Pronunciation

I know the only difference between the two is that "Older" has an "L" sound. But I want to know if that "L" is obvious to native speaker? Or it could be easily mistaken.
3
votes
1answer
529 views

How is the word “Cactaceae” pronounced?

I was wondering how the word Cactaceae, which is the botanical taxon for the Cactus family, is pronounced. I searched for "Cactaceae pronunciation" and found the following pronunciations: cac-'tee-...
4
votes
1answer
218 views

Allophones of /ə/

In (non-rhotic) British English there seem to be two major allophones of the phoneme /ə/. The first which can be heard in potato, career or the weak form of from as an [ə]. However, there's also a ...
0
votes
1answer
175 views

Great Vowel Shift reversed. Is it appropriate? In what region this accent is typical? [closed]

I have been just pointed out that Google translator's GB English speaker pronounces vowels quite differently from the language standard. I made a comparison with Lingvo Online dictionary, which has ...
22
votes
3answers
2k views

Why did the letter “o” disappear in the word “pronunciation”?

The verb pronounce has the letter o in its second syllable, but in the noun pronunciation, that same letter disappears from the corresponding position. Why is that?
67
votes
2answers
29k views

Why is Sean pronounced Shawn?

I've always had this question about the pronunciation of Sean. Is Sean a word from another language? Is it actually not pronounced Shawn and instead it's some sound between Shawn and Seen? Also, why ...
16
votes
6answers
3k views

911: nine one one vs. nine eleven [closed]

The US emergency telephone number 911 seems to be almost always pronounced as nine one one whereas the Porsche model is typically pronounced as nine eleven One reason I can think of for ...
1
vote
1answer
120 views

What's the correct pronunciation of 'improcerous'?

The word improcerous means 'low' or 'short in stature'. How is it pronounced?
0
votes
1answer
158 views

Do you pronounce the T ending sound?

As I was taught in school and , the T ending sound of words is unvoiced and should be pronounced with air, but recently I met a friend from the US, those aired T sounds were missing from her speaking, ...
1
vote
4answers
747 views

Understandable songs to learn English [closed]

I am not very good at speaking and listening English. Can someone please suggest some songs, which have clear pronunciation of English words, to listen and understand the songs too and also I can use ...
7
votes
3answers
1k views

Name for people who cannot pronounce one particular sound

Is there a word in English for the inability to utter a specific sound like the rolled R for instance? In my language, there is a name for people who can only pronounce the uvular/guttural R instead ...