0
votes
1answer
57 views

What is the name of the pronunciation symbol /o/ with a dot over it?

What is the name of the pronunciation symbol /o/ with a dot over it? We know it is pronounced /aw/ but need to know what the name of the symbol is.
2
votes
5answers
513 views

How To Classify A Way Of Speaking Other Than Pronunciation Or Accent?

When you hear certain people talk, there's something distinct about the way they speak that you insist is not their accent. It's not even the pronunciation (e.g. can't vs. cahn't). It's also not their ...
8
votes
1answer
767 views

Phonetic term for switching first two letters in a word

I read a grammar book a few years ago and remember coming accross a term for switching the first two letters in a word. I cannot for the life of me remember what the term is. An example would be the ...
2
votes
1answer
329 views

Is there a word that means “over-enunciate the k sound”?

I am trying to say the word week but focus on the k sound at the end and really emphasize it. I tend to do this naturally in my everyday speech. It kinda sounds like an odd throat sound when I do it. ...
2
votes
2answers
686 views

What’s the word for the habit of writing “play’d” or “revolv’d”?

I’m working on an 18th-century manuscript, and I’m trying to explain to others the use of ’d in past tense verbs. Is there a word that encompasses the usage of ’d in early 18th-century manuscripts? ...
5
votes
1answer
460 views

Why does the “e” in judge vanish in the word “judgment”?

The in the word "judgment", the "e" from "judge" is absent. Three questions on this: Why is this? Is there a name for such a contraction? How and why does the "g" still retain its "soft" ...
2
votes
1answer
842 views

Syllable Count for Apparent Monosyllabic Words

How many syllables are there in "child," "wild," and field"? If we look at the dictionary, it will tell us that these are monosyllabic words. There appear, however, to be diphthongs in each of these ...
4
votes
2answers
248 views

What is retraction in pronunciation?

As in: [I]n English /t, d, n, l/ are retracted before /r/. [emphasis added] —Wikipedia, “Allophone”
8
votes
2answers
565 views

“Non-rhotic” is to R-droppers as “non-?????” is to L-droppers

Certain speakers of English have a tendency to “drop” L’s that occur after a vowel but before another consonant, as in balm, calm, golf, gulf, palm, wolf, and many more. Often these aren’t ...
5
votes
2answers
922 views

Is there a word for “not pronouncing any r's”?

Some find it difficult to form an "r" sound, and some are able to, but just don't. I'm looking for a word which means "not pronouncing r's", without implying inability to pronounce them, though that ...
3
votes
3answers
190 views

Why does using a word/phrase/acronym exessively cause the syllables to become more relaxed?

When working in a professional setting, especially in administration or technical fields, common words/phrases/acronyms get used quite frequently. I've noticed that the more they are used daily, the ...
8
votes
3answers
2k views

Term for words with identical spelling but different meaning and different pronunciation

What do you call words with identical spelling but different meaning and different pronunciation? A couple examples are bass and resume.
2
votes
1answer
414 views

Synonym: Medium or soothsayer

I don't know if many of you watched the new Matt Damon movie Hereafter. Near the end of the movie, the little boy who lost his twin brother meets Matt Damon in the Book reading room, and says ...
2
votes
2answers
567 views

How to pronounce “derivative” in the phrase “f ′ is a derivative of f ”?

How should I pronounce derivative in the phrase “f ′ is a derivative of f ”? Should I read it as [dɪˈrɪv.ə.tɪv] or [dɪˈrɪv.ɪ.tɪv]? I have heard it as [dɪˈrɪv.ə.tɪv] in this context, but Cambridge ...