This tag is for questions about the sounds, intonation, and stress of how words are uttered or produced.

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8 views

Why is “won” pronounced as “one” and not as “wahn”?

I've been saying it that way my whole life and it makes sense when you sound it out. First you say the "w" sound and then you say "on". It was recently pointed out to me that this was wrong however. ...
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1answer
42 views

Two american vowel sounds: in far(a:) and in for(o')

I know that the vowel (a:) in far and the vowel (o') in for are pronounced differently when they are followed by r. But when they stand alone such as raw(a:) vs jaw(o'), They are the same sound to me. ...
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0answers
26 views

What's the proper pronounciation of submariner? [on hold]

What's the proper pronunciation of submariner? Is it like the Marvel comic book character, sub-mair-ə-ner or is it like the vessel with -er ending, sub-ma-ree-ner?
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2answers
34 views

Is it common to pronounce 'only' as 'own-knee'?

I personally find it very hard to pronounce the 'L' sound right after 'N'. Would you say it is quite common or at least understandable to pronounce 'only' as 'own-knee' (fastly)?
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0answers
39 views

I`m just curious about how to speak “anti-” is correct? [closed]

I`m just curious about how to speak "anti-" is correct? it`s like ant/ai/ or ant/i/??
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0answers
26 views

How to pronounce Isabirra (type of cheese)?

Isabirra is a type of cheese. http://www.cheese.com/isabirra/ I couldn't find a source of its pronunciation. Can anybody help me with its pronunciation (in the most layman form). Thanks
2
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2answers
56 views

Pronunciation of diphthongs in English

I found a few similar questions, but none of them gave me the answer to this. I'm a native Serbian, so I have problems understanding diphtongs, because Serbian has none of them. Serbian has only five ...
4
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1answer
84 views

Pronunciation of Korea and Career

Are the pronunciations of the two words identical? Korea v.s. Career
0
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1answer
41 views

Word Stress Within the Phrase I'm expecting someone

I tried pronouncing the phrase: "I'm expecting someone". Phonetically it looks like: [aɪm ɪkspɛkt ɪŋ sʌmwʌn] I perceive some stress on the second syllable of expecting and the first syllable of ...
7
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1answer
139 views

Is the pronunciation of “oa” in “broad” unique?

The "oa" in the word "broad" is pronounced like the words "or" or "awe". In phonetic symbols that is ɔː . However in all other examples I can think of it is pronounced like the "oe" in "toe". Or in ...
1
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1answer
52 views

Pronunciation of double G: soft “gg” versus hard “gg”

When I was a student, I was taught double G is normally hard, as in "agglomerate", "aggregate", "foggy", "aggressive", "dagger", "trigger", "niggard", "doggerel", etc, the exceptions being ...
3
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1answer
124 views

How to pronounce the Polish name “Aronszajn”

Nachman Aronszajn was an American mathematician born in Poland. I will make a talk (in English) on a subject for which I would like to cite some of his works. But since I am not a native ...
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0answers
34 views

Pronunciation of Who is it?

I heard the question "Who is it?" in a movie. [Person A] knocked on a door. [Person B] came to open the door, but before that he asks "Who is it?" This three syllables question can be pronounced ...
0
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1answer
39 views

Stress and intonation in “I'm proud of you”

When I pronounce the phrase: "I'm proud of you" to communicate that I'm proud of the person I'm talking to, do I only need to stress the word "proud" a bit? I think that stressing the pronouns "I" ...
2
votes
1answer
44 views

A flap in a phrase

It seems to me that the "d" is flapped in "I don't know" in American English. Am I right? If I am, I'm wondering if t/d is always fapped at the begining of the word when it is preceded by a vowel? For ...
2
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2answers
228 views

A term for words that change pronunciation with part of speech

I'm talking about words like: construct: CON-struct(n.), cun-STRUCT(v.) present: PRE-sent(n.), pre-SENT(v.) record: RE-cord(n.), ri-CORD(v.) They are pronounced differently based on whether they ...
2
votes
1answer
115 views

Ma'am: Is it as in “ham” solely for the Queen, whilst it remains spoken “ma”+“um” (less any glotal stop) for all others?

It's become conventional wisdom that, when addressing the Queen after introduction, one must be sure to address her as "ma'am" as if it were to rhyme with "ham". Only "ma'am" and "ham" don't rhyme. ...
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0answers
42 views

Words with primary and secondary stress in a phrase

In the phrase "I'm in the same situation" the word "situation" phonetically looks like: [ˌsɪtʃ uˈeɪ ʃən] The first syllable of the word has secondary stress and the third syllable has primary ...
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1answer
60 views

How is the letter “Z” pronounced in Indian English?

How is the letter "Z" pronounced in Indian English? I assumed that Indian English is more similar to British English than to American English, and therefore would pronounce it "Zed". But I came ...
1
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1answer
53 views

How would a speaker of English vocalize W'soran, a sci-fi/fantasy conlang word, taking into consideration that some languages are unpronounceable? [closed]

There is a character in the Warhammer Fantasy universe by the name of W'soran. I've never been sure how to pronounce his name. He's from an Egyptian type culture. Could anyone tell me if they think ...
0
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1answer
60 views

The NG sound in casual American speech

I read somewhere (I don't remember the source and I'm not sure if it's true) that Americans tend to replace the "ng" sound with only "n" in casual/fast speech. For example: Who's calling? sounds like ...
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2answers
864 views

Is it acceptable in American English to pronounce “grocery” as “groshery”?

I caught myself pronouncing the "c" in "grocery" as an "sh" sound. Is this commonplace/accepted, or is it perhaps geographic? Does this occur with "c" in other words? As background, I was raised in ...
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2answers
49 views

Pronounciation of w at the end of a word - and what does ʊ mean?

I noticed that when I pronounce words like Show or fellow I seem to drop the w and just say Sho or Fello. My countries English is similar to British English. I wonder if that is normal or if maybe I ...
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1answer
57 views

What is the correct pronunciation? [closed]

Today, I talked with my friend. And we both have different opinion to each other. The subject is Does British English (native) speaker pronunce the R letter at end of the word. You only think the ...
2
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1answer
97 views

How do you pronounce (r) in British English?

For example, we have - car /kɑː(r)/ - or /ɔː(r)/ I thought the brackets means you delete it - i.e. non rhotic - but now I see the phonetic spelling of words like "hard" which don't include the r ...
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9answers
9k views

Is there any English word in which “ph” is not pronounced as “f”? [duplicate]

A few days ago, a friend and I were discussing how every "rule" of English spelling or pronunciation has an exception, and every exception has an exception as well. Then I brought up the rule of a ph ...
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0answers
21 views

Pronunciation and rules of English grammar [duplicate]

These questions have been nagging me from time immemorial. Who decides all the seemingly funny pronunciations in English? A syllable is pronounced in some way, somewhere, and (maybe) in an entirely ...
1
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1answer
35 views

Word Stress in “It's up to you”

I watched a video on Youtube about the pronunciation of the phrase "It's up to you": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZaZrkhCqWbk and it says that "up" is the stressed word. I think that "It's" can ...
1
vote
1answer
97 views

Fast speech and palatalization T+D

when the phrase "I understand you" is pronounced, does the palatalization happen in fast/connected speech? In other words, does the D+Y sounds more like a J sound as in Joke). Here's the way I ...
1
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1answer
50 views

The elision of alveolar plosives

when the phrase "Can't complain" is pronounced [ˈkænt kəmˈpleɪn] I think that the T is dropped in fast speech because of the alveolar plosives. Right? I read that when T comes before these letters: / ...
3
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1answer
63 views

TR sound and Word Stress

I read in American accent book that when a "t" is followed by an "r" sound, the "t" changes and becomes an almost "ch" sound. "To create this sound correctly, say "ch" as in chain, but just make the ...
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1answer
63 views

Pronunciation of What do you want to do?

When I pronounce the question: "What do you want to do?", I hear some stress on the first syllable of "whaddya" and "wanna" and a bit stronger stress on "do". This is how I pronounce it: ...
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0answers
54 views

Pronunciation of “thank” using ð (voiced th) instead of θ (unvoiced th)

Both my younger siblings pronounce "thank" using ð, voicing the "th". I have never heard any other native speaker pronounce it this way. Both my parents, my older sibling, and I all pronounce "thank" ...
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5answers
91 views

What is the term for the relationship between two words when they have similar but not identical pronunciation? [closed]

What is the term for the relationship between two words when they have similar but not identical pronunciation? For example the words "cheat" and "sheet", "core" and "sour", "think" and "thank", ...
4
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3answers
100 views

Is there a word or term to describe mispronouncing a word due to someone else's accent?

In college, I had a Japanese linear algebra teacher who was not a native English speaker. The subject matter was new and difficult, so with new terminology to learn, it was sometimes to difficult for ...
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1answer
52 views

Word Stress in “I have a + noun”

I know that any word can be stressed in a sentence to give it emphasis, but in the following sentences I'm interested in a default unemphatic accent. When I pronounce these phrases: A: I have a ...
-1
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2answers
45 views

How to pronounce X-mas [closed]

How should I pronounce Xmas? Is it the same as we pronounce the word Christmas?
1
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2answers
77 views

So, we don't change /t/ to /d/ if /t/ is between 2 vowel sounds and /t/ is the beginning of the stressed sound in a word in American English, right? [duplicate]

Ok, see this word entertainment has IPA of /en.təˈteɪn.mənt/. Ok, now in American English if /t/ is between 2 vowel sounds then it will become /d/ cos it is flap T. But /t/ will become flap T only ...
2
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2answers
57 views

Do we need to put extra sound W or J in front of L in the case of /ei+L/ or /ee+L/ or /ai+L/ or /oo+L/ or /oi+L/ in American English?

Ok, let see the sale /seɪl/, that is from IPA but when speak American English, do we have to put /seɪ-jl/ (sound like sei jo) Similarly, feel /fiːl/ will become /fiː jl/ or mile /maɪl/ will become ...
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3answers
98 views

Which English words are commonly misused by non-native English speakers? [closed]

It's quite easy to find lists of commonly misused words. They are all over the internet. But it's not clear which of them are the MOST commonly misused words. This article says that there are 38 ...
2
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1answer
71 views

Word stress: Sorry to keep you waiting

When I heard the phrase: "Sorry to keep you waiting" [sɔri tə kip jʊ weɪdɪŋ] in an American movie it sounded to me that: Sorry, keep, and waiting are the stressed words. I may be wrong because I'm not ...
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3answers
89 views

How is 's/he' pronounced? Do we say 'She or he should …“ or ”He or she should …"? [closed]

How is 's/he' pronounced? Do we say 'She or he should ..." or "He or she should ..."? Ex.: When a person applies for a job, s/he should always bring a resume.
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0answers
86 views

a flap in “wedding” and “bidding”

I'm wondering if a flap occurs in "wedding", and "bidding" in American pronunciation? I can't hear it out here: http://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/american/wedding
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3answers
503 views

How do “you” pronounce eczema?

/ˈɛɡzɪmə/, /ˈɛksɪmə/, /ˈɛksmə/ As I no longer live in the UK I don't usually hear how eczema is pronounced, so I've always pronounced it as ig-zee-muh but recently my English boyfriend told me that ...
0
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2answers
68 views

Word Stress Within a Sentence: Adjectives

I read this in American accent book: "Place full stress on an adjective if it's not followed by a noun. If it is followed by a noun, stress the noun more." For example I have this phrase: Have a ...
0
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1answer
92 views

Beauchamp. ..Beacham (phonetically spelled)?

In London there is a street in Knightsbridge spelled Beauchamp. The English pronounce it as though it were spelled Beacham. Why?
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0answers
35 views

Should you pronounce the plural 's' after a word that ends with 's'? [duplicate]

I've always said, for example, "Achilles' shield" as "Achilles-es shield". However, I've noticed others don't pronounce the plural, simply just keep it as "Achilles". Should you pronounce the '-es', ...
2
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2answers
126 views

Why the extra syllable in words like these ending in -r and -l?

First-off, I'm not a native speaker. I've noticed that a lot of words ending in -r and -l are pronounced as if they had an extra syllable. Especially when they have a -ee- or -ai- sound. Consider ...
0
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2answers
111 views

How would an English speaker pronounce “valid” with a circumflex over the A?

My branding department (read my friend from work) has suggested the word "vâlid" with a circumflex over the A as a way to brand my product. He just likes the way a lowercase a looks in typography. ...
6
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1answer
221 views

When did the a/an distinction happen?

Why do we have two versions of the indefinite article? When did this happen? Are there any texts where only one is used?