This tag is for questions about the sounds, intonation, and stress of how words are uttered or produced.

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0answers
30 views

How do the British pronounce these names?

Leif, as in Leif Ericsson; Elise, I know the British pronounce Denise like "dih-'neez"; Gisele; and Gisela
-1
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0answers
33 views

Sycophant - Fig-shower: pronounce the word shower in fig-shower? [on hold]

Sychopant has the root meaning sykon-fig, phanein- "to show" . With reference to that should the shower in fig-shower be pronounced as show + er or shower as in light fall of rain. Edit: my ...
1
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2answers
64 views

Why is the word watch pronounced differently from words like patch, latch, match, catch, and batch?

Why doesn't watch rhyme with catch, batch, latch, patch, and match?
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0answers
18 views

Could you Clarify the Front - Back & Close - Open position & other positions in between in IPA vowel chart?

See the IPA vowel chart A front vowel is any in a class of vowel sound used in some spoken languages. The defining characteristic of a front vowel is that the tongue is positioned as far in ...
0
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1answer
41 views

First or second syllable accent for “tarot”

Is it acceptable to pronounce "tarot" with the accent on the second syllable? So, phonetically it would be pronounced "Ta-ROW." My own online research showed me that there were maybe one or two times ...
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0answers
57 views

Pronouncing vote as voyt? [closed]

I constantly hear television announcers who have a British accent pronounce vote as voyt, boat as boyt and ocean as oyshun. They almost always say oy instead of the long o (oh). Why is that?
0
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1answer
55 views

How do native English speakers pronounce these Vietnamese words “Le” & “Bo”?

I am Vietnamese & If I see "Le" & "Bo" I will pronounce them as /le/ & /bo/. But seem English doesn't have any /e/ or /o/ as a phoneme. A phoneme /ˈfoʊniːm/ is one of the units of sound ...
0
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1answer
25 views

Am I thinking right about “Front”, “Near-Front”, “Central”, “Near-Back”, “Back” position of IPA vowel chart?

See this Standard IPA Vowel chart Source I am confused of the "Front", "Near-Front", "Central", "Near-Back", "Back" position of the tongue. If you draw a straight line from the position ...
2
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0answers
34 views

Could you clarify /e/ and /ɛ/?

This is quite confused! In the Standard IPA Vowel chart, there are /e/ and /ɛ/, see the bellowed picture (Source) However, many American English Vowel charts don't have /e/. So, I think that Some ...
0
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1answer
84 views

Is there any word in English that has the vowel “o” stands alone without any other vowel standing next to it?

See this picture (Source) See the vowel "o" I couldn't find any word in English dictionary that has vowel "o" stands alone without any other vowel standing next to it. Let say, I can see /ɡoʊ/ ...
0
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0answers
33 views

How do you tell the difference between “wrong” and “run” in perception test?

Background Just developing a linguistic test - native English speakers can pass(100% correct), and L2 learners cannnot pass(even though they are very proficient). "Wrong vs run" pair was chosen. ...
-1
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0answers
33 views

Why is 'Sesame' pronounced as 'se-see-me'? [closed]

Why is the word 'Sesame' pronounced 'se-see-mi' instead of 'se-sa-me' (like in French)? Are there any other words have similar pronunciations, and can these types of words be classified under a ...
2
votes
1answer
81 views

Yod dropping - Why is there a distinction in the pronunciations of “sewn” and “hewn”?

"Sewn" is pronounced /sōn/, whereas "hewn" is pronounced /hyo͞on/. Is there a reason for the difference in their pronunciations despite their spellings and origins being similar?
6
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0answers
215 views

“Alcohôlic” vs. “melanchŏlic,” “sôlvent” vs. “sŏlute.” What source describes this change?

According to Merriam-Webster, the pronunciation of alcoholic is "ˌal-kə-ˈhȯ-lik, -ˈhä-" while the pronunciation of melancholic is "ˌme-lən-ˈkä-lik." OK, the title is an exaggeration: they can rhyme ...
1
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2answers
51 views

Words pronounced with stress patterns like in “politics”, “lunatics”, etc.?

Could anyone please give a list of words pronounced with no primary stress immediately preceding the suffix -ic, such as in "politics", "lunatic", "arithmetic"? Also, is there an absolute stress ...
11
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2answers
3k views

Isn't a “gonner” or “gonna” slang for a person about to die?

(I think this "blank" moment of mine is what is called in AmEng a brain fart, so be it) Isn't ‘a gonner/gonna’ slang for a person who is about to die? It's said in situations where, potentially, ...
7
votes
1answer
148 views

How do you pronounce “bald”?

I've always heard it pronounced /bɒld/ (rhymes with scald, for those of you who don't know IPA), however the dictionary and some of my friends say /bɔ:ld/ (rhymes with mauled). I'm British, by the ...
1
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1answer
45 views

Pronunciation of luxury

Is there a reason that Americans now pronounce luxury "lugsury" instead of "lucshury" while still pronouncing "extract" and "extra" with the more common "x" sound?
0
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1answer
56 views

Pronounciation of “string”

According to Wiki "string" is pronounced as /stɹɪŋ/. However, all of my acquaintances have split opinions about the 'g' at the end. I'm of a mind that the 'g' is pronounced, e.g. two strings, not two ...
1
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0answers
40 views

Phonograms ey and ie

My son is using Spalding phonogram cards in his kindergarten class. I like them for the most part, aside from a few weird examples and explanations that aren't quite right, but that I can live with. ...
3
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0answers
82 views

How do New Yorkers pronounce “oil”? [closed]

There's a list of "New York" words and phrases that's been surfacing on the Web periodically for quite a few years. Not all New Yorkers speak like that, I assure you. Only barely-above-the-gutter ...
0
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0answers
20 views

why “come into a place” sounds like /kʌməntsə/ /pleis/

Two sentences from 60-Second Science Now a study finds that a teacher's racial biases come into play in different ways for high-achieving kids versus low-performing ones. While listening to music, ...
0
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1answer
43 views

Tawkin'? Tawk? I don't get the joke

from Tom Wolfe's The Bonfire of the Vanities: "I'll think a something. Half a my practice consists of talking to people who are not anxious to talk." Tawk. Killian leaned forward and said, ...
4
votes
2answers
368 views

Since when has “J” been sounding like [dʒ] and no longer “Y” [duplicate]

There are words that have "j" where in most languages it would be pronounced like romaji "y". Take for example "Jesus", "Jehovah", "John". It should be pronounced "Yesus", "Yehovah", "Yohn". Slavic ...
2
votes
1answer
88 views

Why does Tom Hanks pronounce “stupid” as “st-you-pid” in “The Bonfire of the Vanities”?

This may or may not related to my previous question. In this movie (which is based on another one of Tom Wolfe's novels, The Bonfire of the Vanities, Tom Hanks plays the lead character who is an Ivy ...
3
votes
1answer
59 views

Pronouncing “found” as “fyound”: why?

I had a teacher in high school who spoke like that, and an elderly neighbor: both women. When I first read Tom Wolfe's novel A Man in Full, I ran across this passage: "You must be Mr. DeCyasi," ...
3
votes
2answers
102 views

Intensification of Consonants in English Pronunciation

In many languages, my mother tongue included, you frequently encounter words that have an intensified consonant within them, especially if the consonant is between two vowels. A good idea to ...
1
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1answer
64 views

How to make clear the difference between 0 and O?

It's reasonably clear that there's a difference between the lowercase "o" and "0", but it's harder to tell with a uppercase "O" and "0". When saying them, certainly in the UK, "Oh" can be both o and ...
1
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1answer
78 views

Lenis and Fortis Clusters Assimilation

I've been looking for my answer but I still haven't found what I want. I have a question regarding lenis voiceless+fortis voiceless clusters (in American English). Does the fortis voiceless consonant ...
1
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0answers
45 views

Words that are spoken one way but written another

I was recently involved in answering this question: Renumeration vs Remuneration (reimbursed financially), which is correct? Which asks whether "renumeration" or "remuneration" is correct in terms ...
2
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1answer
43 views

When did “-tile” and “-sile” (in missile and volatile) become “-tl” (or “tahyl”)?

The dictionary states as follows: [vol-uh-tl, -til or, esp. British, -tahyl] Especially British? Hmm. Don't kill me: I've never heard the following lyrics actually performed; I've only read them; ...
0
votes
2answers
50 views

“Potential” pronunciation

I was raised to pronounce "potential" with a long o (ō). This makes sense where the syllables are divided. Yet, the online dictionaries I have checked say it is "puh". Can you comment?
4
votes
1answer
122 views

Why are there no English nouns starting with “th” pronounced as /ð/?

I just saw a claim that there are no nouns in English that start with "th" pronounced as /ð/, and I am convinced that is correct for at least Received Pronunciation, General American and Australian ...
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2answers
59 views

How do you pronounce Calvin in British English

How do the British pronounce the 'a' between c and l? Is it like 'callous' or 'call'?
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1answer
59 views

English pronunciation of the letter “a” [closed]

I heard the letter a was pronounced /ei/, and sometimes it was pronounced as /ə/. So, can you tell me when is it pronounced as /ei/, and when as /ə/?
2
votes
5answers
127 views

How do you say 7/7?

We have several service agreements, but we're not sure how you actually say 7/7. A 7/7 service agreement means support every day (even weekends), during business hours. Do you just call it ...
0
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0answers
4 views

How can i pronounce letter 'a' correctly? [migrated]

I've read different questions about pronouncing 'a' like this : Sounds of the letter a In my native tongue-Arabic- there are 3 degrees of pronouncing 'a' -degree one is like -able -degree two is like ...
4
votes
4answers
259 views

Adding an L when appending an -ium suffix to a word? (Metallium vs. Metalium)

I am Romanizing a business name from Hebrew, and am wondering what the most appealing or 'correct' spelling might be - Metallium or Metalium. The owners of the business went with the latter, but my ...
6
votes
3answers
798 views

Explanation and rules for adding and subtracting 'r's in British pronunciation?

For example, the sentence, "The Premier of China drank vodka and beer in his car with Obama." A BBC presenter would pronounce it like: The Premieh of Chiner drank vodker and bee'h in his ca' with ...
1
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1answer
55 views

how to read numbers of 6 digit in formal english

How to say these two numbers: 112177 eleven hundrends thousands and twenty one hundren and seventy seven one hundred and twelve thousands and one hundred seventy seven the same for this number ...
2
votes
1answer
72 views

How do I know where to place the stress?

In questions that start with interrogative pronouns such as: what, when, and why, should they be stressed? For example, is the word "time" stressed in the sentence? Is "What" stressed, too? What ...
1
vote
1answer
56 views

Choose a username is easy to remember and pronounce [closed]

English is not my mother tongue language. But I am trying to pick a good internet user name for my new career life in America. And I read a lot of "How to Naming" article but still have no idea. I ...
8
votes
4answers
947 views

How to read “and/or” aloud

Is this read as and or or? Because it doesn't sound right while speaking aloud. Or is there some other way you can say it?
0
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1answer
61 views

Why do people write “Hellooo” instead of “Heeello” to show a prolonged sound? [closed]

I'm not a native English speaker, so I don't know what to search for on Google and similar. In chats I often read words like 'helloooo', or 'sureeee'. And as I understood it, it's meant to mimic the ...
1
vote
1answer
97 views

Does Bender from Futurama sound like a non-American? [closed]

Robot Bender is one of the main characters in the animated television series 'Futurama'. Bender — Best moments (5 minute video). Does Bender speak ‘proper’ American English? Does he have an ...
1
vote
1answer
48 views

how to pronounce “th”

It's a weird question , I want to know how to pronounce "th" correctly as in (the or thin) should i bring my tongue out of my teeth :D In Arabic(as my native lang.), the correct pronunciation of ...
1
vote
1answer
89 views

Why is /e/ generally transcribed as 'ay'?

I’ve seen pretty often in phonetic transcriptions for English speakers who weren’t familiar with the IPA the phoneme /e/ or /ɛ/ transcribed as ay: Here "lejos" (/'le.xos/) is transcribed as ...
2
votes
1answer
34 views

Text for exhibiting different pronunciations

I'm looking for a text that can be used to showcase various differences in pronunciation across English accents. For example, it could include examples of the various splits/mergers (Mary/merry/mary, ...
5
votes
3answers
394 views

'Sag' and 'slant': Is the vowel /æ/ the same in both words?

/sæg/ /slænt/ Transcriptions from Cambridge American English Dictionary Both the words' IPA transcriptions have an /æ/ symbol. Do those two /æ/s sound the same? Are they both short or ...
7
votes
1answer
64 views

History/origin of the pronunciation/spelling of “Butcher”?

The pronunciation of the first syllable of butcher as /ˈbʊt͡ʃ ..../ is for non-native speakers astonishing. From spelling alone, one would probably guess that it's pronunciation would be more like ...