This tag is for questions about the sounds, intonation, and stress of how words are uttered or produced.

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1
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1answer
24 views

How can I change my nickname so that it's pronounced correctly?

My nickname for online games is "Davarius". I'd like the 'var' to be spoken so that it rhymes with 'car'. But people always say it "Da-VARE-ius". Should I spell it different? Or just deal with it.
2
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1answer
60 views

Is “fillet” a different word in “salmon fillet” than in “leather fillet”

In the question "Is there a name for words which are pronounced differently depending on which definition is being used?" it was suggested by two people that when the word "fillet" is used to describe ...
3
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2answers
175 views

Is there a name for words which are pronounced differently depending on which definition is being used?

I was thinking about the word "fillet" recently. When I teach high school freshmen about the word (in a machining/engineering context), they refuse to believe that it is pronounced "FILL-it," rather ...
0
votes
3answers
94 views

The T in “stair” and D in “dare” [duplicate]

I checked that their pronunciations are /ster/ and /der/ But I can't hear the difference between them! Can anyone tell me the difference and how to pronounce them separately?
1
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1answer
42 views

Name for the practice of composing sentences for ease and clarity of pronunciation?

Is there a name for the practice of composing sentences in such a way that they don't contain proximate consonants which cause difficulty when read aloud? For example: Under this criteria, "dogs and ...
0
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1answer
49 views

Did I stress the words correctly in this sentence?

I have this sentence: "Keep your voice down!" I'm not sure how native speakers pronounce it, but I would put a bit of stress on "Keep" and more stress on "voice" "2Keep your 1voice down!". I don't ...
1
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0answers
28 views

Common Nouns Pronunciation [on hold]

Can common nouns be pronounced as we like as we do with proper nouns or is there a rule?
1
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1answer
96 views

Pronunciation of “release” [on hold]

My dictionary gives [rili:s], but I am hearing [rili:z] with firmly articulated "-z". Does the pronunciation with "-s" really exist? UPD: Ok, probably it's a glitch in my ears, and I cannot ...
1
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2answers
212 views

Mycorrhizae: how the heck do you say “zae” in greek?

So, I'm trying to sound smarter than the people to whom I'm pontificating about no-till gardening, and I'd like to include a pronunciation of "mycorrhizae" (which is, of course the plural of ...
1
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0answers
32 views

How do we say hexadecimal numbers? [duplicate]

When speaking series of decimal numbers, we say "one... nine, ten"; when speaking hexadecimals do we say "one... e, f, ten"? Do we say "nineteen, ateen, bteen... fteen, twenty" and so forth, or do we ...
2
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2answers
69 views

Idiom: Get off your high horse (American English Stress)

Get off your high horse [gɛt̬ _ɔf jər ˌhɑɪ 'hoərs] We have a flap T linked with the word OFF. I'm not sure which words I should stress in the idiom above, apart from the noun "horse" which is the ...
1
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0answers
47 views

Is the split in pronunciation of “detail” regional, semantic, or irrelevant?

Or maybe just haphazard? Something else? When I want to refer to a small military unit put together to carry out a specific task, I'll call it a DEtail, accent on the first syllable. When I want to ...
0
votes
1answer
60 views

Does “ng” sound at all like “Angular”?

I've started working with the AngularJS web development framework, and the first question in their FAQ is this: Why is this project called "AngularJS"? Why is the namespace called "ng"? Because ...
2
votes
3answers
86 views

Pronunciation of “bifurcate” as an adjective

It appears that the word "bifurcate" has a single spelling, but two possible pronunciations. As a verb, according to both Wiktionary and dictionary.com, the pronunciation of the verb is: ...
1
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0answers
36 views

Sentence stress and word linking with the problematic Y?

the question: Can I use your bathroom? phonetically looks like: [kə_naɪ ˈyuz yər ˈbæθˌrum] I think the stress should be on the verb USE and the noun BATHROOM. Am I right? Some dictionaries show the ...
0
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0answers
30 views

Transcribing the pronunciation of “emission” on merriam-webster.com

I think the pronunciation of the word, emission, at merriam-webster.com is incorrectly labeled. According to their way of transcribing a pronunciation, their transcription of the pronunciation of the ...
3
votes
3answers
156 views

Are there many -tion words that sound like 'vision'?

Usually -tion words, such as motion, education, and lotion, end with a -shn sound. But equation ends with a sound rhyming with vision. Are there many more? What might some of them be? And if the ...
5
votes
1answer
162 views

How did some English words get a “y” sound in front of “uː”-sounding vowels?

I'm wondering what mechanism puts a y sound (IPA /j/) into words like coupon, which presumably had none when it came into the language. French pronunciation would seem to indicate it would be ...
0
votes
1answer
37 views

What's this notation for marking up pronounciation?

What's this notation for marking up pronounciation? analgesic: ann-ull-JEE-zick What's a good introductory article or book to learn it?
0
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0answers
52 views

Sentence stress: I'm sort of busy right now

I heard this phrase in a TV show: "I'm sort of busy right now". You can listen it here (I cut out the phrase): https://clyp.it/4khla44l Phonetically it looks like: [ɑɪm soərt əv bɪzi raɪt naʊ]. The ...
1
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1answer
54 views

Word Stress in a 3 syllable phrase

the phrase "Never mind" is three syllable [nɛv ər maɪnd]. The first and the last syllable gets stressed. Am I right? [2nɛv ər 1maɪnd]. I think that "mind" gets the most stress. I would like to know ...
0
votes
1answer
55 views

Difference between I'll be home 'by ten' and 'at ten' [duplicate]

I have a question. What does this phrase mean "I'll be home by ten", because it is confusing, especially when used with "at" instead of "by". When it comes to sentence stress which words should I ...
2
votes
2answers
205 views

Why does “garage” have different pronunciations?

Whenever I'm teaching private students and we are faced with the word garage, I always hesitate a little. Italians have borrowed the term garage, which they pronounce /gaˈraʒ/. It stands for the ...
0
votes
1answer
71 views

What to use after a word which ends with “se” to indicate possession? [duplicate]

I apologize for the seemingly simple question. I've searched on Google for this, but could not find anything. The word "Recluse", meaning (noun) "a person who lives a solitary life and tends to avoid ...
1
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2answers
58 views

The pronunciation of words which begins 'con' and 'com'

I know there is no strict rule on pronunciation of words in English but here my question is about the words which begin with 'con' and 'com', more than asking general rule. When I look at the words ...
1
vote
1answer
40 views

“long” <i> - inconsistencies in the relationshipt between orthography and pronunciation

I'm wondering about the dual pronunciations of the letter /i/ in open syllables- usually it has the realization [a͡ɪ], representing the regular outcome of long i after the great vowel shift, but ...
2
votes
1answer
95 views

Pronunciation Feedback Required

Did I pronounce the phrase "I'm gonna be gone for five weeks" correctly? https://clyp.it/oobrogbu Phonetically it looks like: [aɪm gɑnə bɪ gɔn fər faɪv wiks]. I have no idea which words should I ...
25
votes
4answers
449 views

How is “deque” commonly pronounced?

deque is a standard container in the C++ programming language. Its name stands for Double Ended QUEue. I am wondering how this word should be pronounced: like deck (this is how I've pronounced it so ...
1
vote
1answer
69 views

English pronunciation: I'm sorry for your loss [closed]

the phrase "I'm sorry for your loss" phonetically looks like [aɪm sɔri fər_yər lɔs]. When I heard this phrase in a movie, it seemed that the words "sorry" and " loss" were a bit more louder, but I may ...
14
votes
5answers
3k views

What would be the onomatopoeia for “spit”?

Just wanted to know how to write in a chat room the sound for "spit". As in "meow" for the sound that a cat makes, what would you write for the sound of the verb "spit"? (Google wasn't very helpful, ...
0
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0answers
44 views

a flap in “video”

I asked here recently about a word "oratory". Somebody told me there is no flap in American English, because a t is before a stressed vowel (second stress). It's right. But why there is no flap in ...
1
vote
1answer
59 views

Stress pattern of “trust me”

Are the words "Trust me" equally stressed? The vowel in the word "me" is a bit more tense (like in meet) I think. It's a two syllable phrase: [trʌst mi]
2
votes
1answer
240 views

Why is “viva” pronounced `/ˈvaɪ.və/` in the academic sense?

Usually, (and intuitively), the word is pronounced /ˈviː.və/ or /ˈviː.vɑ/ However, I recently learned that in the academic context, the same term is pronounced /ˈvaɪ.və/. Why is this the case, and ...
4
votes
1answer
108 views

American English: Can you

when the question "Can I help you?" is pronounced it sounds like "Can I" is reduced to "knai". It's short and quick, but the verb 'help' is stressed, the voice goes up at the end of the question. It's ...
1
vote
2answers
64 views

Word stress with noun and negative + noun

I have two sentences: I'm in a hurry. [aɪm_ɪn_ə ˈhɜri] I'm not in a hurry. [aɪm nɑd_ɪn_ə ˈhɜri] I linked the words together (consonant + vowel). I use the flap T in the second sentence (I marked ...
4
votes
1answer
202 views

how to properly use “that that” so as a listener/reader/speaker can comprehend the entire sentence without complication?

Be it either whilst writing or reading, I've not come by an easy way to comprehend the use of the 'that that' lexical ambiguity, taking into account that improper use of punctuation is not the issue. ...
1
vote
2answers
58 views

Is it true that only unstressed words in a sentence, which have H at the beginning of the words, will be dropped in American English?

Is it true that only unstressed words in a sentence, which have H at the beginning of the words, will be dropped in American English? Off course, these H words will not be the beginning of the ...
0
votes
1answer
66 views

So called “tap”, or “nap”

I'm interested in so called "tap" in american English. I've read a tap occurs in a word "twenty". I've heard this word in the internet and I've noticed a t is not pronounced or is pronounced simply as ...
-1
votes
1answer
60 views

Position of stress in English words derived from New Latin

In another thread on this site a question was asked about the pronunciation of the word Caribbean; that discussion focused on the position of the accent. Cognate forms of the word Caribbean have ...
0
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2answers
164 views

Is the diphthong [ai] in a non-primary stressed syllable a hypercorrection? [closed]

Is the diphthong [ai] in a non-primary stressed syllable a hypercorrection? Some American people pronounce the prefix "anti" like an-tie. For example, here's a pronunciation of "anti-Christian" ...
0
votes
1answer
84 views

Should British r be spoken out in liaison?

For example, the r in "better" is not pronounced in British English. How about the "r" in "a better idea"?
0
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3answers
88 views

Or, Ore, Awe and Oar [closed]

Does everyone pronounce these the same way? (I mean all 4 words - not American vs. English)
0
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2answers
86 views

How to pronounce Smith's

s following th is really hard for me. My tongue is never fast enough. I wonder if there is any reduction here. How do you pronounce it?
2
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4answers
70 views

Is the stress necessary on Don't in Don't mention it

the phrase "Don't mention it" phonetically looks like [ doʊnt ˈmɛn ʃən_ɪt ] I think the primary stress is on the second syllable "ˈmɛn". Am I right? But my question is, is it important to add any ...
0
votes
1answer
69 views

American English word stress What time is it?

In the question "What time is it?" we only stress the noun "time". Am I right? The "is it" part at the end is unstressed. Right? I'm not sure if the word "what" needs secondary stress or not. I need ...
0
votes
1answer
50 views

Pronunciation of a double C [closed]

I always pronounce words like "accelerate" and "eccentric" as "asselerate" or "eesentric". I don't know why but the "ks" that I hear in common pronunciation irks me. Is it correct to pronounce the c's ...
0
votes
2answers
83 views

How to pronounce miracle?

I ask this because I recently had a debate with my family about how to pronounce this word, miracle. They said it was pronounced with the "mir" in miracle the same way "mir" is in mirror. ...
0
votes
0answers
77 views

Is a syllable defined phonetically or etymologically?

Reading recent postings about syllables I've been struck and baffled by talk of the possibility that words may have a different number of syllables when they are written than when they are spoken. Is ...
1
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0answers
73 views

Is “church” one syllable or two? [duplicate]

I read like twenty years ago that the word "church" (clutch, hatch, match) is undoubtedly one syllable when written but that an argument can be made that it's two syllables -- CHUR-ch -- when spoken. ...
4
votes
2answers
93 views

American English Word Stress Last Content Word

I read that as a general rule, the last content word of a phrase gets the most stress. So, in the sentence "I'm late" late will get the most stress. Now if we add the word "Sorry" at the beginning of ...