This tag is for questions about the sounds, intonation, and stress of how words are uttered or produced.

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1
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1answer
46 views

Is there a simple guide for 's' vs 'sh' pronunciation in words?

Consider the following words as examples: 1) Version 2) Progression 3) Differentiation 4) Fission 5) Fusion 6) Insurance 7) Sure I pronounce all these words with a 'sh' sound even though it is not ...
1
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0answers
15 views

How to pronounce “besieged the” in “The army besieged the town for 30 days.”

How to pronounce "besieged the" in "The army besieged the town for 30 days." As I understand, the [d] sound in the end of besieged can be omitted. So it will be [bɪˈsiːdʒ ðə], which for me is very ...
5
votes
1answer
52 views

Why is “renege” pronounced with a hard “g” sound?

The word renege comes from Medieval Latin renegare (source). It is the only English word of Latin origin I'm aware of that doesn't follow the soft g pronunciation rule. The g is hard even though ...
3
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0answers
56 views

Can penult stress for “stigmata” and similar words be explained or justified by any principle?

I enjoy studying the pronunciation of Greek-derived words in English, and I've found an odd anomaly. There appear to be two possible pronunciation patterns for words ending in the plural suffix -ata ...
1
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0answers
23 views

Can the stress pattern of “uroboros/ouroboros” be explained by any principle, or is it random?

The word "uroboros," coming ultimately from Greek, has a couple of spellings and also pronunciations (see How to do you pronounce Ouroboros?). As explained by Nohat in the linked page, the two ...
0
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1answer
41 views

How to best correctly spell this sound?

Remember back in school (or still in school, like me) when someone got called to the office and all the kids in the class made an 'ooou' sound with the intonation slowly rising? Yeah... Anyway, I was ...
2
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2answers
56 views

Pronunciation of word “considered”

I have learned in school that letter 'r' is not sounded in the word 'considered', here's an example. But I have been watching the 'How I met your mother' series, and Ted have pronounced that with ...
1
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2answers
50 views

Is it OK to pronounce kilogram as “kay gee” (/ˈkeɪˈdʒiː/)?

Would the same also apply to other abbreviations such as km (kay-em) instead of kilometer? I can see an advantage to reading millimeter as mm (em-em) because it's quicker to say.
1
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2answers
85 views

the omitted “t” sound

My English teacher told me that some native speakers omit the /t/ sound in some words, for example, writ't'en, Bri't'ain, impor't'ant. That means before pronouncing the /t/, there is a sudden pause ...
1
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1answer
60 views

How would you pronounce N.B. (nota bene) when reading aloud?

I know how to pronounce nota bene (YouTube can help if your Italian is rusty), but if you were reading an academic paper aloud (or something else that would contain notate bene), how would you go ...
0
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2answers
48 views

In which varieties of English is 't' in 'often' silent?

I'm an Indian and all my life I've pronounced 'often' with 't' silent. Since we follow British English, I assume British people say it the same way? I guess in American English, one pronounces it with ...
0
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1answer
38 views

Pronunciation of “ikebana” by non-Japanophones

Apart from "very rarely", how is "ikebana" (Japanese flower arrangement) typically pronounced in real life by non-Japanophones? Is it the same as how it's pronounced in Japanese, or has it changed ...
1
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0answers
58 views

Is there a formal spelling for the English letter names?

The English alphabet has a common pronunciation. For example, B is pronounced as "Bee", C as "See" and I as Aye. Is there a formal spelling for the letter names?
0
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1answer
40 views

When speaking, how to link “barged her” in “She barged her way through the shopping crowds”?

She barged her way through the shopping crowds. The complete form should be [bʌdʒd hər]. I'm not sure in order to link those two words when speaking, it should be [bʌdʒ ər] or [bʌdʒd ər]? Thanks.
2
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1answer
76 views

Pronunciation of anonymize

I “googled” the word anonymize to verify its spelling because it is not in the Chrome’s dictionary. Before I closed the tab, on a whim, I clicked the little speaker icon to hear Google’s pronunciation ...
1
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2answers
97 views

Why does /t/ after a consonant (ex: /ˈnaɪn.ti/) produce less air than /t/ at the beginning of word (Ex: /ˈtaɪlænd/) or after a vowel (Ex: /ˈraɪ.tər/)?

Ok, my mother tongue is Vietnamese and I often got difficulty making the English /t/ sound. Here is what I discovered. -If a /t/ is the beginning of word (Ex: /taɪ/ tie, /tɪn/ tin, /ˈtaɪ.lænd/ ...
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0answers
35 views

About the pronunciation of “secret” /ˈsiːkrɪt/, should we pronounce /k/ & /r/ at the same time or each sound separately but really continually?

Ok, now see the pronunciation of secret /ˈsiːkrɪt/. I am not sure what is the right way to pronounce /kr/. Since there is no answer on the internet, so I think there are 2 ways to pronounce it: 1- ...
0
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1answer
51 views

How to pronounce the letter /r/

I've always had difficulty pronouncing the letter /r/. Whenever i try to say /r/ it comes out as a gha, a sound similar to the arabic letter غ. Any idea how i can fix this?
1
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0answers
52 views

“Accessory” pronounced with a stress on the first syllable

I'm a first language English speaker, but grew up Bilingual in Spanish in a Spanish speaking country. Today I was speaking to another first language English speaker (Canadian) and used the word ...
6
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1answer
968 views

What is the word that sounds like “caromize” which means “cook a dish until we can reduce the juice in that dish to being viscous”?

OK, once I watched the Master Chef program and I heard people use a word that sounds like "caromize" to express the meaning of “cook a dish until the juices of the dish has reduced and is viscous”. ...
0
votes
1answer
121 views

So, should “Thailand” be pronounced as /ˈtaɪ.lænd/ or /ˈθaɪ.lænd/? [closed]

OK, I searched on the Internet and found that online dictionaries give the following pronunciation of Thailand as /ˈtaɪ.lænd/. Cambridge English Dictionary says noun /ˈtaɪ.lænd/ Oxford ...
0
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1answer
83 views

Can vs that ( /kæn/ vs /ðæt/ )

I’ve finally decided to take a look at my English pronunciation and it is being an awesome new world. I am focused on Received Pronunciation (British Standard) and one question comes to mind for which ...
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0answers
20 views

Please reconsider the closing of this question and reopen it for a response that actually answers the question [migrated]

Look at the question that was asked here and not sufficiently answered: What is the difference between "phonetic" and "phonemic"? The question is asking whether there is a ...
3
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2answers
137 views

Why do American English speakers pronounce both syllables in “challah” equally?

I live in the US, and I've noticed that "challah" seems to be generally pronounced by Americans as something like /hala:/ (or possibly /ha:lə/), with either equal stress on both syllables or a slight ...
2
votes
2answers
122 views

How to pronounce “seventeen” and “seventy”?

As titled, both of these words always sound similar to me. Sometimes, the stress of these words will shift. For example, "seventeen" will say "SEVENteen". I am not sure whether it is correct or not. ...
2
votes
3answers
137 views

How to pronounce “Calm”?

I need to know how "Calm" is exactly pronounced (whether the L is silent or not). And I need a good reference as an evidence.
2
votes
1answer
93 views

In Jamaican English, why is there no θ sound?

For example, three is pronounced as "tree," and thing is pronounced as "ting." How come Jamaicans do not have a θ sound in their accents?
2
votes
2answers
88 views

What was the original pronunciation of 'Zounds'?

According to the Online Etymology Dictionary, the exclamation 'Zounds!' comes from the phrase 'God's wounds'. This seems to suggest that the original pronunciation rhymed with 'wounds' rather than ...
2
votes
1answer
132 views

A recent trend in pronouncing “the”

I have observed a recent trend to pronounce "the" as "thuh" even if it is followed by a vowel (as in "thuh evening.") Is this regional (I live in Alabama) or national? I think it's the latter. And ...
1
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1answer
55 views

how to pronounce “t's” sound, as in “it's” or “that's”

Currently I'm studying English pronunciation and having a hard time pronouncing the t's sound such as it's and that's. I thought that "t's" sounded the same as the "ch" sound but one of my friend said ...
7
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1answer
130 views

Is there any online tool to read (pronounce) IPA and APA written words?

I am looking for a tool to read a word written as phonetic transcription (IPA or APA). I need it to provide users with a tool to verify if they've chosen correct IPA transcription (users will need ...
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votes
1answer
50 views

We like a name but dont know how to spell it? [closed]

We like the sound of Mill-eat-a but dont know how to spell it so that shortens to Millie and not milie as in cyrus
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2answers
89 views

How do I pronounce my surname?

I am not a native English Speaker, but I work with English speakers on a daily basis and they have always troubles pronouncing my surname, so they will often ask me to tell them how they can pronounce ...
0
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2answers
52 views

do native English speakers completely omit the /r/ sound in /ˈev·riˌwʌn/ (everyone)?

Most Asian non-native English speaker pronounce the /r/ clearly in the word everyone /ˈev·riˌwʌn/. However, when hearing the pronunciation of /ˈev·riˌwʌn/ in some online English dictionary, I hear no ...
2
votes
1answer
165 views

Why do we say 'year 1993' as “nineteen ninety three” instead of “one thousand nine hundred ninety three”?

Why do we read some calendar years by their two-digit place value and not according on their numerical place value like: 1500s as fifteen hundreds and not one thousand five hundreds 1895 as ...
2
votes
3answers
108 views

Do native speakers ever make pronunciation mistakes? [duplicate]

I've been thinking of this and I'd appreciate if a native speaker could reply. Many times I see on the internet lots of English-related material about how to pronounce correctly, and that is mainly ...
1
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2answers
67 views

Unable to pronounce 'sh'

I know a number of speakers for whom English is a second language who are unable to pronounce sh. As a result, words such as passion become something along the lines of pass-en. I'd like to know what ...
-1
votes
1answer
40 views

About TSC acronym pronunciation [closed]

How would you pronounce TSC acronym ? tē ĕs sē ? or most probably people would use a word like pronunciation Tis´ic ? :-(
0
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2answers
78 views

Pronunciation of ‘few’ as [ˈfjyu̯]

I was surprised to see that Wiktionary states few be pronounced as /ˈfjuː/ or /ˈfju/. I have always pronounced it as [ˈfjyu̯]. Furthermore, I've copied the pronunciation from what I've heard and when ...
1
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4answers
92 views

What's the name for when a word changes its pronunciation because of how people read?

With greater literacy in the past 100 years, most English speakers are also proficient at writing. Sometimes due to the great divide between English spellings and the true pronunciation, people will ...
15
votes
7answers
2k views

How to pronounce fractions larger than a twentieth, where the last digit of the denominator is a 1 or a 2? i.e. one thirtieth is to 30 as _ is to 31

Disclaimer: I speak British English. I've noticed a lot of differences between the way Americans and Brits pronounce numbers.1 Since the question concerns this, I thought it might be appropriate to ...
1
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2answers
71 views

Word for space-origination

How could you say something is from space? For instance, californian, french, american, etc. Spactian sounds like something that could perhaps be correct, but the spelling's transposition into ...
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1answer
83 views

How to pronounce JOHN? [closed]

Can someone help me to pronounce JOHN correctly? People seemed to struggle to understand me.
2
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1answer
66 views

How to pronounce “digne” and “na”?

I looked up unproduced in the Oxford English Dictionary (OED)¹ and it gave an example quotation from the 1965 edition of John Ireland's 1490 compendium The Meroure of Wyssdome ("The Mirror of ...
0
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2answers
45 views

Linking Homorganic Consonants

when native speakers pronounce the phrase "Have a good time" do they tend to drop the "d" in the word "good"? The "t" and "d" are in the same tongue position and the only difference between them is ...
1
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2answers
70 views

What is the difference between /ɚ/ (farmer /ˈfɑːr.mɚ/) & /ɝ/ (bird /bɝːd/)?

Ok, look at this vowel diagram of English language, you will see /ə/ & /ɜ/ are the central vowel. Both has the middle of the tongue raising in the middle of the mouth, except that /ə/ has to raise ...
0
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0answers
85 views

Confused about sound /a/ & /ɔ/ in English Vowel diagram and in English dictionary?

Given this vowel diagram: Could you explain the difference between: /a/ as in five /faɪv/ /ɑː/ as in RP arm /ɑːm/ /ɒ/ as in RP hot /hɒt/ /ɔː/ as in RP law /lɔː/ Is /ɒ/ the same as /ɔː/? ...
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1answer
41 views

What is the correct transcription of 'wikinames'?

I thought that this is [ˌwiki'neimz], but do I really need to indicate primary stress, since names contains only one syllable?
0
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0answers
39 views

LINKING: Suffix -ed to Consonants [duplicate]

I read this in American accent book. I quote the text exactly how it is written in the book: The suffix -ed is not pronounced precisely when it is linked to another consonant. For example, mailed ...
3
votes
2answers
117 views

Pronunciation Deleting /t/ Between Consonants [duplicate]

When I pronounce the phrase: "Look, it's the first day. I don't wanna be late." I think that the /t/ in the words "first" and "don't" can be deleted. Am I right? I'm talking about casual speech. ...