A pronoun is a word that can function by itself as a noun phrase.

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3answers
8k views

“Neither” and “either” usage in negative sentence

I would like to make sure I understood the usage of these: Do you want A or B? I do not want either. [none of them] I want neither. [Can I say that?]
8
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2answers
326 views

“Each” — pronoun or adverb

I am looking at these two sentences: M and W are letters that each have 4 strokes. M and W are letters and each has 4 strokes. It seems that each is an adverb in (1) but a pronoun in ...
3
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1answer
101 views

The use of the genitive in: We had a good time despite “its” raining

"We had a good time despite its raining." Why does the genitive pronoun not work here, yet in the majority of examples we have a choice between accusative and genitive pronouns:- We had a good ...
6
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2answers
1k views

Which is correct: 'as beautiful as her' or 'as beautiful as she'?

From what I have understood from reading about she/her, I understand that 'she' is to be used as a subject (with the 'be' implied) and 'her' as an object, but I am confused about the usage with ...
-1
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0answers
31 views

How to pronounce “thon”? [closed]

Charles Crozat Converse proposed "thon" as a gender-neutral pronoun for English in the 19th century, and it's often been cited since. But…how do I pronounce it? Rhyming it with "on" and "done" doesn't ...
0
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0answers
31 views

Female or Male pronouns matter in this case? [duplicate]

As far as I understand, English nouns do not have a 'gender' so to speak - when I say the word 'manager' I may be referring to a woman or to a man, one cannot infer the gender just by hearing the ...
3
votes
1answer
65 views

Is it grammatical to use “same” or “the same” in substitution for an objective pronoun?

I've seen and heard this usage of the pronoun "same" more than once, and it sounded strange to my ears: "Thank you for the book; I will return same shortly." "Wine production has increased, ...
14
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4answers
7k views

Referring to objects as “she”

Sometimes people are referring to mechanical objects as "she": I love my car. She always gets the best service. Are there any rules when it is appropriate to use "she" instead of it, and is "he" ...
-2
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1answer
57 views

“I went for a run with Victor” vs. “we went for a run with Victor” when only the two of us went [closed]

Myself and Victor went for a run, no one else. Can I say "We went for a run with Victor?" OR "I went for a run with Victor?"
1
vote
1answer
240 views

Did English ever have Distinct Inclusive and Exclusive 1st Person Plural Pronouns?

I have always had trouble when people talk to me and say "we" - because I often don't know whether that includes me or not. "Hey, we're going to the movies." Just by that, how do I know if they want ...
4
votes
1answer
1k views

Context to distinguish “we” inclusive versus exclusive [closed]

In English, "we" has no clusivity - context is needed to determine whether it means we-including-you or we-excluding-you. What context can a speaker provide to disambiguate without sounding awkward? ...
2
votes
3answers
165 views

Plural indefinite pronouns?

Can some indefinite pronouns be plural? One commenter on Mr K's Grammar World says they cannot. He also says the following examples contain quantifiers, and not indefinite pronouns. Many have ...
9
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3answers
2k views

Which is grammatically correct: “Let he who…” or “Let him who…”

Let he who believes in this prophet speak now what he knows. Let him who believes in this prophet speak now what he knows.
0
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1answer
43 views

Ones as Pronoun Reference

Take the following sentence: Are mathematically proficient students, or even mathematically brilliant students, always motivated? Can students be replaced by ones? Are mathematically ...
-1
votes
1answer
61 views

“It is me whom she loves” or “It is I whom she loves” which one is grammatically correct? [duplicate]

It is me whom she loves or It is I whom she loves Because I know that "It is I" is grammatically correct.
4
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4answers
396 views

What does “Toff's error” mean?

"He's invited the wife and I" and other similar sentences are referred to as Toff's error. What is, precisely, the meaning of this term?
3
votes
1answer
60 views

What pronouns are used in the vocative?

A coauthor and I are drafting a letter, and we're not yet sure whom we're going to be sending it to. So I sent a draft to my coauthor, which started Dear [whomever]: Now, that line in a letter ...
5
votes
4answers
442 views

Specific numbers as pronouns

As "none" and "some" are pronouns, so can specific numbers function as pronouns: How many students failed? In "none failed," none is a pronoun. In "seven failed," seven is a pronoun. But in what ...
0
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1answer
37 views

‘It’ – ambiguous antecedent?

Take the following sentence: And even if the program inputted one token and then invoked newLine(), wouldn't it input a blank? I've been told that this sentence has a clear pronoun reference. ...
3
votes
5answers
37k views

When to use 'ourselves' vs. 'our self'

I wrote when we place our self meaning each one of us, his or her self -- and was told to use "ourselves" instead. Who is right?
18
votes
7answers
34k views

What does “thy” mean?

I read a sentence containing the word thy, but I cannot find the meaning of that word. Is it older English, or is it still used in contemporary English today?
0
votes
2answers
62 views

What is the most appropriate pronoun for humanity?

Humanity lived thousands of years in the environment without any source of electric power, but in the environment with radiation they will be dead in a few days.
8
votes
3answers
2k views

Reason for the current trend to use «she» as the gender-neutral pronoun?

There are some questions on gender-neutral pronouns both here and on Writers. User Christine Letts writes: In academia, there is currently a movement toward using the feminine pronoun at all ...
1
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0answers
55 views

“Somewhere” - is it really a pronoun?

Is it? If it is then why is not listed in the major dictionaries? LDOCE, Dictionary.com, Merriam-Webster: No
7
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5answers
868 views

Why is “herself” required in this particular sentence?

Why is a reflexive pronoun, i.e. herself, grammatically required in the following sentence? I gave Susie a picture of herself. Compare with: I gave Susie a picture of her. This ...
2
votes
3answers
3k views

Is the usage of “in your humble opinion” correct?

We use "in my humble opinion" to express humility. But I even see usage of "in your humble opinion" to ask for others' opinions. What does it mean? I see the usage in the original message here, ...
0
votes
2answers
15k views

What are the grammatical rules for use of “these”, “those”, and “them”?

I am unclear of the use of [these|those] objects. I am unsure when to use [these|those|them]. Please someone help me tell me which is correct in the previous sentences. This is not a dupe of ...
7
votes
4answers
614 views

Why “me” instead of “my” in pirate speech?

I don’t understand the usage in constructions like “Spare meself, me ship, me crew” in Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s End. Is it a dialect or “bloody pirate’s speech” or what?
0
votes
1answer
59 views

“Isn't it?” vs. “isn't she?”

That is the woman who married Tony, isn't it? That is the woman who married Tony, isn't she? Are both sentences correct? If they are, what is the difference in meaning?
2
votes
2answers
335 views

Is this usage of “whose” correct?

Is the following phrase (grammatically) correct? Bill Gates, whose company is very rich, is famous. (I couldn't come up with a better context-free sample)
11
votes
3answers
18k views

How do you make the possessive form with “He and I”-style subjects? [duplicate]

Despite being a native speaker of American English, I cannot find a construction that sounds natural when trying to form a possessive from coordinated subjects including a first person pronoun, like ...
5
votes
5answers
36k views

When to use “me” or “myself”?

Which one is correct: Someone like me... or Someone like myself... Is "like myself" ever correct?
1
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2answers
105 views

A case of optional “that”: “check the” vs. “check that the”

Consider the following use case: Please check the username and password are correct. Please check that the username and password are correct. In this case, I would say that that is required ...
6
votes
7answers
4k views

Is [Its'] a word? (Note the apostrophe at the end.)

I just had a strange flashback to a conversation I had when I was in high school, with a man who was regarded by many members of a particular online community as having an impressive degree of ...
1
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2answers
95 views

Using pronoun “it” instead of (personal) pronouns “her” or “him”

Can pronoun "it" be used instead of (personal) pronouns "her" or "him" in a disparaging/derogative manner especially in the personal pronouns? I've watched a movie wherein a dead body was found and, ...
0
votes
2answers
35 views

Mean of, 'Save by thine own accord'

I want to understand a prayer entitled 'Good Morning Lord' by Grace E. Easley. In the last stanza the words thy and thine own are used, ' No joy or pain is ever sent, save by Thine own accord, so in ...
1
vote
1answer
72 views

Who, the subject or the object of the main clause, does the subject pronoun of a subordinate clause refer to? [duplicate]

It goes as follows in an un-manipulated text about websites serving as social networks: They are sweepingly putting many users on the brink of addiction, if they are not already victims of it. ...
-1
votes
1answer
59 views

What does “which” refer to in “in respect to which”? [closed]

From footnote 34 on page 216 of Thinking Like a Lawyer by Frederick Schauer:  . . . it is accepted that individuals have due-process rights to notice and hearing [//] with respect to ...
1
vote
3answers
170 views

Pronoun for antedecents of different gender connected with “or” ,“either… or…”

I know that the sentence "David or Michael forgot to take his parasol" is correct. But what about the case when two opposite genders are connected by or? David or Alice forgot to take _ parasol. ...
0
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0answers
34 views

“Ourselves” versus “Us”—sentence-specific use? [duplicate]

I'm confused about when to use ourselves and when to use us. I looked at this question, but I'm not sure how to generalize that answer to the sentence I am working with. We need to base our ...
1
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0answers
44 views

Cohesive devices

Hi I'm analysing an old advertisement at the moment. Below's a picture of it, I'm stumped on one thing. Can someone tell me if the pronouns 'you' and 'your' are anaphoric references or exophoric ...
2
votes
1answer
84 views

Use of reflexive pronoun (you or yourself)? [duplicate]

Given the choice in sentences: I appreciate the help from both yourself and Bob. I appreciate the help from both you and Bob. Which is correct? I'm stuck because I can't seem to ...
2
votes
1answer
81 views

Dependent clause after pronoun

This question arose from why sentence #1 is correct and why sentence #2 is incorrect - I pity those who lost their money in gambling. I pity them who lost their money in gambling. I have ...
14
votes
6answers
3k views

Where “summat” came from

In Scottish English, I know that the word summat is used in place of standard something. But what's the etymology of this pronoun? It seems unlikely to me that summat could be merely a variant ...
1
vote
2answers
254 views

As much as “you” or “you do”

I came across this sentence in a blog.. "You'll receive no more than 1-2 emails per week, as we hate spam just as much as you. " While I appreciate the sentiment, i can't help but wonder if they hate ...
1
vote
2answers
80 views

English approximations of Spanish pronouns

Excuse me if this question sounds familiar, but I've searched and couldn't find what I desired. In the Spanish second-person, there is usted (formal), tú (familiar), and ustedes (plural for both). ...
3
votes
4answers
954 views

“Which” or “what”

Much of (what/which) scientists know about dinosaurs has been recently discovered. The phenomenon of (what/which) are known as corporate networks has also attracted attention. And yes, the ...
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2answers
72 views

“as much as you and I” vs. “as much as you and me”

This was posted on facebook and people are saying it is incorrect, it should be: "...as you and I" Which is correct?
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1answer
63 views

What does “themself” mean? [closed]

My English teacher explained about themself and themselves. I don't really quite understand though.
1
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1answer
57 views

Using the pronoun 'one' twice in a sentence for the same person

I often read sentences that use the pronoun 'one' twice to refer to the same hypothetical person, but I've always felt reluctant in using it myself. Here's an example: One's experiences shape ...