A pronoun is a word that can function by itself as a noun phrase.

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3
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2answers
425 views

passive Vs active or omission of 'which is'

What is the part of speech of 'regarded' in the following? "a quality of beauty and intensity of emotion regarded as characteristic of poems" (NOAD) Why isn't it "... [which is] regarded ..."? ...
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0answers
25 views

Referring to humans in a rhetorical analysis essay [on hold]

Take the sentence: Woolf gears her essay to the inquisitive mind, attempting to raise thoughts about whether humans are pathetic beads of life in time’s entirety, or whether we are somehow more ...
14
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6answers
8k views

Why 'a friend of mine' is not 'my friend's friend'?

I have some questions about the expression "a friend of mine" and I'm quite confused with it. Actually I have found some threads about this topic but they don't hit my point. I'm not a native English ...
8
votes
3answers
4k views

“All our X” vs. “all of our X”

Is the word "of" optional in this instance? Is either of these considered preferable to the other? Taste all our delicious treats. Taste all of our delicious treats.
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2answers
27 views

When saying “this one” when referring to yourself, is it first or third person? [on hold]

I have been playing a RP forum game and I believe that one of the other players may be locked into first/third person every post he makes. Which one it is doesn't change it from a gameplay view but it ...
1
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2answers
60 views

Can “own” stand on its own?

My gut feeling tells me that sentences such as Own mistakes have to be dealt with first. Own experience matters the most. We present own results. are not correct, and I would ...
1
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1answer
37 views

Microsoft word and confusion about himself/he/him

I am writing a small essay and I am confused about how to how to properly express this particular sentence below: Chapter 11 begins with the saint chastising the king who was thinking himself to be ...
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2answers
54 views

How far can an implied pronoun be?

The following sentence my friend came up with seems wrong to me: (1) "The vulnerability is due to insufficient sanitization of user-supplied data before being used to execute commands." Compare ...
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2answers
8k views

“And you?” or “And yourself?” as response to “How are you?”

If someone asks "How are you?", which of the following is grammatically correct? "I am well, thank you. And you?" or "I am well thank you. And yourself?" 'Yourself' sounds more formal, and is used ...
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0answers
47 views

rewrite the sentence making the adjectives true pronouns and changing true pronouns to adjectives plus nouns [closed]

rewrite the sentence making the adjectives true pronouns and changing true pronouns to adjectives plus nouns 1. My class is good 2. Their group was shy 3. Theirs was the best 4. Ours is in 5. His ...
0
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0answers
23 views

Borrowing gender neutral pronouns [closed]

Lacking a gender neutral pronoun in modern English, how acceptable is it to borrow foreign or antiquated terms for this use? "Hir" and "zhe" are common results when researching this topic, and "hen" ...
4
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4answers
5k views

“He” / “she” vs. “it” regarding beloved objects

Is that normal to regard a beloved object (an animal, a car, a book) as he/she? If yes, what gender should be used in this case? One comment in this question touched the tendency to humanize things ...
3
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1answer
59 views

Proper use of I vs me [duplicate]

I stated the following: Angela was reading to Frank and I. Someone corrected me, stating "Frank and me" Which is right?
0
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0answers
58 views

How to ask a mixed gender group for their participation?

This question deals with the use of y'all in written vs. spoken English, gender neutrality and group dynamics. I often find myself writing emails to both men and women asking if they would like to ...
0
votes
4answers
69 views

How to rephrase so I don't use “I” or “you” or any other pronouns? [closed]

I hope I helped you see this situation more clearly is the sentence that I need to rephrase, and my English teacher shot down the idea of this should help everyone see the situation more clearly ...
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0answers
27 views

words used for pseudo-subject [duplicate]

Based on what I have understood from the answers given, the word 'there' is what is called 'pseudo-subject' if it introduces a sentence. I want to know whether there are other words that can act as ...
6
votes
5answers
953 views

Why is “herself” required in this particular sentence?

Why is a reflexive pronoun, i.e. herself, grammatically required in the following sentence? I gave Susie a picture of herself. Compare with: I gave Susie a picture of her. This ...
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2answers
43 views

Do I need to add “the” in front of “reluctance”?

Do I need to add the in front of reluctance? Is the use of others right? The problem that this study addresses is that the reluctance of newly educated nurses to make their careers in hospitals ...
1
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1answer
60 views

Ones as Pronoun Reference

Take the following sentence: Are mathematically proficient students, or even mathematically brilliant students, always motivated? Can students be replaced by ones? Are mathematically ...
0
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3answers
196 views

Recognizing right relative pronouns for clauses

I have read some grammar points about adjective clauses, but I still have problems recognizing the right choice in questions requiring them. A Jekyll and Hyde is a person who has two ...
6
votes
2answers
5k views

What possessive pronouns do have an apostrophe?

I was explaining it's vs. its to someone the other day, and I said "None of the pronouns (his, hers, theirs, yours, its, whose, ...) has an apostrophe." Later I got to wondering whether that was ...
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votes
1answer
78 views

What does “which” refer to in “in respect to which”? [closed]

From footnote 34 on page 216 of Thinking Like a Lawyer by Frederick Schauer:  . . . it is accepted that individuals have due-process rights to notice and hearing [//] with respect to ...
1
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1answer
53 views

“You and me against the world” vs “You and I against the world” [duplicate]

I have heard the first sentence in a song and there are also other songs that go something like "Me against the world" and "Me against the music". Shouldn't it be "You and I against..." since the ...
5
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3answers
147 views

In the sentence “It is she”, which is the subject?

If she is the subject, what is then the function of it? If it is the subject, then shouldn't the sentence be It is her since she is a subject pronoun? Thanks!
0
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0answers
25 views

Difference between “everybody” and “everyone” [duplicate]

I would like to know the difference between these two words. Do they have a specific use?
2
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3answers
443 views

“it's” vs “its”: what happened lately?

During the course of the last 6-12 months (approx.) online I've seen more and more the mistake of using "it's" in place of "its" and the other way around. While my habits might have slightly changed, ...
75
votes
6answers
9k views

What’s the rule for using “who” and “whom” correctly?

I can never figure out whether I should use who and whom. Most people use who for both colloquially, but that’s not correct. What’s the rule for using who and whom correctly?
3
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1answer
60 views

That tight hair of hern?

Yes. If she'd just let that tight hair of hern all out loose and careless-like, as it used ter be, and wear the sort of bunnits with posies in 'em, and the kind o' dresses all lace and white ...
15
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4answers
20k views

“Its” as a Possessive Pronoun

Since its can be both determiner possessive pronoun and nominal possessive pronoun, an example of its as determiner possessive pronoun would be: We saved this question for last because of its ...
2
votes
3answers
8k views

“Neither” and “either” usage in negative sentence

I would like to make sure I understood the usage of these: Do you want A or B? I do not want either. [none of them] I want neither. [Can I say that?]
8
votes
2answers
364 views

“Each” — pronoun or adverb

I am looking at these two sentences: M and W are letters that each have 4 strokes. M and W are letters and each has 4 strokes. It seems that each is an adverb in (1) but a pronoun in ...
3
votes
1answer
112 views

The use of the genitive in: We had a good time despite “its” raining

"We had a good time despite its raining." Why does the genitive pronoun not work here, yet in the majority of examples we have a choice between accusative and genitive pronouns:- We had a good ...
6
votes
2answers
1k views

Which is correct: 'as beautiful as her' or 'as beautiful as she'?

From what I have understood from reading about she/her, I understand that 'she' is to be used as a subject (with the 'be' implied) and 'her' as an object, but I am confused about the usage with ...
0
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0answers
31 views

Female or Male pronouns matter in this case? [duplicate]

As far as I understand, English nouns do not have a 'gender' so to speak - when I say the word 'manager' I may be referring to a woman or to a man, one cannot infer the gender just by hearing the ...
3
votes
1answer
72 views

Is it grammatical to use “same” or “the same” in substitution for an objective pronoun?

I've seen and heard this usage of the pronoun "same" more than once, and it sounded strange to my ears: "Thank you for the book; I will return same shortly." "Wine production has increased, ...
14
votes
4answers
8k views

Referring to objects as “she”

Sometimes people are referring to mechanical objects as "she": I love my car. She always gets the best service. Are there any rules when it is appropriate to use "she" instead of it, and is "he" ...
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votes
1answer
60 views

“I went for a run with Victor” vs. “we went for a run with Victor” when only the two of us went [closed]

Myself and Victor went for a run, no one else. Can I say "We went for a run with Victor?" OR "I went for a run with Victor?"
1
vote
1answer
263 views

Did English ever have Distinct Inclusive and Exclusive 1st Person Plural Pronouns?

I have always had trouble when people talk to me and say "we" - because I often don't know whether that includes me or not. "Hey, we're going to the movies." Just by that, how do I know if they want ...
4
votes
1answer
1k views

Context to distinguish “we” inclusive versus exclusive [closed]

In English, "we" has no clusivity - context is needed to determine whether it means we-including-you or we-excluding-you. What context can a speaker provide to disambiguate without sounding awkward? ...
2
votes
3answers
202 views

Plural indefinite pronouns?

Can some indefinite pronouns be plural? One commenter on Mr K's Grammar World says they cannot. He also says the following examples contain quantifiers, and not indefinite pronouns. Many have ...
9
votes
3answers
2k views

Which is grammatically correct: “Let he who…” or “Let him who…”

Let he who believes in this prophet speak now what he knows. Let him who believes in this prophet speak now what he knows.
-1
votes
1answer
75 views

“It is me whom she loves” or “It is I whom she loves” which one is grammatically correct? [duplicate]

It is me whom she loves or It is I whom she loves Because I know that "It is I" is grammatically correct.
4
votes
4answers
410 views

What does “Toff's error” mean?

"He's invited the wife and I" and other similar sentences are referred to as Toff's error. What is, precisely, the meaning of this term?
3
votes
1answer
64 views

What pronouns are used in the vocative?

A coauthor and I are drafting a letter, and we're not yet sure whom we're going to be sending it to. So I sent a draft to my coauthor, which started Dear [whomever]: Now, that line in a letter ...
5
votes
4answers
529 views

Specific numbers as pronouns

As "none" and "some" are pronouns, so can specific numbers function as pronouns: How many students failed? In "none failed," none is a pronoun. In "seven failed," seven is a pronoun. But in what ...
0
votes
1answer
44 views

‘It’ – ambiguous antecedent?

Take the following sentence: And even if the program inputted one token and then invoked newLine(), wouldn't it input a blank? I've been told that this sentence has a clear pronoun reference. ...
3
votes
5answers
40k views

When to use 'ourselves' vs. 'our self'

I wrote when we place our self meaning each one of us, his or her self -- and was told to use "ourselves" instead. Who is right?
19
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7answers
36k views

What does “thy” mean?

I read a sentence containing the word thy, but I cannot find the meaning of that word. Is it older English, or is it still used in contemporary English today?
0
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2answers
77 views

What is the most appropriate pronoun for humanity?

Humanity lived thousands of years in the environment without any source of electric power, but in the environment with radiation they will be dead in a few days.
8
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3answers
2k views

Reason for the current trend to use «she» as the gender-neutral pronoun?

There are some questions on gender-neutral pronouns both here and on Writers. User Christine Letts writes: In academia, there is currently a movement toward using the feminine pronoun at all ...