A pronoun is a word that can function by itself as a noun phrase.

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What is “its” referring to?

In the following sentence, what is “its” referring to?  “SomeSystem” or “their own proprietary software product”? Company X, from Germany, takes the role of a remote provider and integrates ...
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197 views

What pronouns are used in the vocative?

A coauthor and I are drafting a letter, and we're not yet sure whom we're going to be sending it to. So I sent a draft to my coauthor, which started Dear [whomever]: Now, that line in a letter ...
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22 views

Proper pronoun usage: It or That?

Suddenly I came up with this question. (assuming when somebody and I are talking about mobile phone bandwidth) my limit is 7gb. I often exceed it after 15th, then need to pay extra for better ...
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How does “I never had nothing” mean “I never had anything”? [duplicate]

In a BBC Documentary about Brexit, an interviewee stated his reason for voting out as following: We are giving to some of the eastern Europeans who come in here at that time. they have more priority ...
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55 views

Choosing between objective and subjective pronouns

Which of the following sentences uses the correct pronoun forms and why? My parents met in Havana -- him an artist and her a singer. My parents met in Havana -- he an artist and she a singer.
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they said “it's” the best? [on hold]

I am wondering whether you find the following dialogue flows well: A: How's the steak? B: It's juicy and tender. A: Yeah. No wonder they (= staff at the restaurant) said it's the best. The pronoun ...
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40 views

What does 'one' in this sentence refer to?

The past decade has seen a growing public fascination with the complex “connectedness” of modern society. At the heart of this fascination is the idea of a network – a pattern of interconnections ...
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Singular and plural ambiguity of the noun “trio”

According to dictionary.com, a trio is defined as "any group of three persons or things". trio noun, plural trios. any group of three persons or things. Trio is a singular noun that ...
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What happened first: “ye”/“you” merging to “you”, or “thou”/“thee” falling ou of common use?

Simple subject "I": I went. Replacing it with "me": Me went. That sounds strikingly wrong. We use it for fake "caveman talk". However, there was a time when it worked like this: 1st ...
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37 views

Why “It is raining?” instead of “Rain is coming”? [closed]

People will normally say, "It's raining". Why can't it be, "Rain is coming?"
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30 views

Regarding the usage of solicit [closed]

Is the following sentence correct: The manager did not get upset because he solicited an excuse for him. Note: "he" in the aforementioned sentence refers to the manager, while "him" refers to ...
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3answers
82 views

Mayoral Pronoun; it or he/she

Recently I have heard both of the following sentences: The previous mayor was a woman, wasn't she? The mayor is male, isn't it? These seem to me to bear a gender contradiction here; "the ...
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Them - Themselves? [migrated]

Here is the sentence I am struggling to make sure it is correct. What pronoun is correct- them to themselves or as written? Thanks But my friends love being them, and I love them being them, but I ...
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72 views

“SALLY had been the first one to greet PAULINA when SHE appeared in the doorway” Pronouns

I read the following sentence and I thought the pronoun "she" could refer to either the subject or the object of the sentence. Sally had been the first one to greet Paulina when she appeared in ...
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1answer
75 views

Correct pronoun for “baby”

Stumbled along the use of the feminine pronoun for "baby". Previously, I've used it and singular they when the sex of the baby is unknown. Is it correct to use the feminine pronoun (she) for "baby" ...
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44 views

How should I understand the pronoun “they” in this sentence?

The following is a transcript from Scientific American. If you were searching for a life form unlike anything known to science, where would you look? Scientists at Charles University, in Prague, ...
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Reason for the current trend to use «she» as the gender-neutral pronoun?

There are some questions on gender-neutral pronouns both here and on Writers. User Christine Letts writes: In academia, there is currently a movement toward using the feminine pronoun at all ...
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What’s the rule for using “who” and “whom” correctly?

I can never figure out whether I should use who and whom. Most people use who for both colloquially, but some people say this is not correct. What’s the rule for using who and whom correctly?
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“I give it to him who came first” vs. “to he who came first” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Which is grammatically correct: “Let he who…” or “Let him who…” Should the pronoun be "him" because it's the object (gave it to him), ...
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6answers
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Did English ever have a formal version of “you”?

From the top of my head, Danish "De" (practically never used), German "Sie", Chinese "您", French "vous", Spanish "usted" are a formal way of addressing someone, especially if one isn't familiar with ...
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as you see them in some movies

Which one should one use a. Patients in mental asylums are not dressed as you see in some movies. b. Patients in mental asylums are not dressed as you see them in some movies. Many thanks.
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Why “themselves” and “himself”

In the earliest grades of elementary schools, students learn that "hisself" and "theirselves" are not words. I do not understand why this is. If you wanted to refer to 'his' sock, you would say "his ...
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Style Question: Use of “we” vs. “I” vs. passive voice in a dissertation

As I'm not a native speaker and just finishing my dissertation in Computer Science, I wonder what style I should be using. In German (my native tongue) most dissertations, school-books and scientific ...
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Use of a pronoun to refer to something that follows

This is the opening sentence from the Edgar Allan Poe short story 'The Facts In The Case Of M. Valdemar'. Of course I shall not pretend to consider it any matter for wonder that the extraordinary ...
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473 views

Antecedents of indefinite pronouns

Consider the sentence, "Most of the apples are fresh." Is it incorrect to say that apples is the antecedent of the indefinite pronoun most?
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“What ever happened to” versus “Whatever happened to”?

I recently asked Whatever happened to (some noun from the past)? But then wondered if I should have preferred to split whatever into two words: What ever happened to (some noun from the ...
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Possessive pronouns

Does a first-person possessive pronoun have to come last if it is in a list with others?" "My irresponsible sister loves jewelry, so she took both Sally's and mine. "The same room was marked ...
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Is there a name for the practice of dropping pronouns in written speech?

I’m specifically thinking about emails I receive all day where someone will write: Haven’t seen it yet. Will respond when received. If it were spoken, we would certainly hear: I haven’t ...
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What reflexive pronoun should I use if don't know the gender?

I am writing something for university and I am talking about how a patient might hurt... himself/herself? itself? (talking about the patient) If it was something informal I would use themselves but ...
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How should I avoid this reflexive pronoun, or is it okay?

I typed a sentence in Microsoft Word as: o Each mobile operating system implements encryption in their own way. It was part of a list of bullet points. I got dinged for their own being ...
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3answers
122 views

Is “My dog can run much faster than I” correct? [duplicate]

I have been revisiting English grammar lessons for a test & I'm reading Pronouns. During a self test I came across this sentence "My dog can run much faster than ___". I selected "me" & ...
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26 views

“It wasn't me …” or “It wasn't I …”? [duplicate]

Which of the following usage is correct, grammatically? a) It wasn't I who did this project. b) It wasn't me who did this project.
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Learn the guitar vs. learn guitar [duplicate]

I'm having a debate with a friend who teaches music. In English we say learn music or learn programming but when it comes to guitar, I feel tempted to say learn the guitar instead of learn guitar. Is ...
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Is it acceptable to start an emphatic sentence with “It is he who…”?

It is he who the students choose as the repersentative of their class. Is this sentence grammatically correct? If not, why? I would like to know whether the pronoun ‘he’ can be used in this grammar ...
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59 views

Why isn't the objective case of the pronoun used in the given sentence? [duplicate]

"It is not we who are stupid," answered the camel-men, "but you." I would say that sentence should be "It is not us who are stupid", because it is usual practice to use objective case after verbs ...
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29 views

Where vs when - a matter of place or one of… time [duplicate]

Educated by weaklings, idolators of stigmata, especially fragmentary ones, we belong to a clinical age when only cases count. This is a quote from E.M. Cioran's book ''All Gall Is Divided'' (...
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Very confused!, what is the difference between “Impersonal Pronoun” & “Indefinite Pronoun”?

Oxford Dictionary say, Indefinite Pronoun: a pronoun that does not refer to any person or thing in particular, for example ‘anything’ and ‘everyone’ Source Impersonal Pronoun: a pronoun (in ...
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'None' and 'No one' [closed]

Do we use a plural verb with 'none' and a singular verb with 'no one'? We may say: None but the brave deserve accolades. But when we use 'no one', it is grammatically correct to say that 'No one ...
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1answer
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Do intensive pronouns ever convey new information? [duplicate]

So for instance, the sentence 'I myself am called James' is not different to 'I am called James', information wise. As a comparative measure, take the sentences, which make use of reflexive pronouns '...
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What type of pronoun shoould I use before a gerund? [duplicate]

While reviewing grammar, I came upon this sentence: "I was able to inspect the apartment without his noticing the movement of my eyes." However, this phrasing seems awkward, especially the "his". I ...
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What is the correct grammar: “we” or “us”

What is the correct grammar for this sentence fragment: She needed we the taxpayers to pay.... She needed us the taxpayers to pay.... because without "the taxpayers", the correct sentence ...
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In poetry, what can I use to refer to someone without gender?

I am translating a poem from Korean. The poet is deliberately avoiding a gender reference (or, deeming it unnecessary) by using a neutral impersonal pronoun. In Korean there are generally few inbuilt ...
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1answer
57 views

Me, myself or I in non-I clause

MS Word is underlining the word myself and I am now wondering if I should be using me instead, seeing as the subject is not I. Which one is correct? Are both possible? At this point, putting as ...
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Non-moderate words

What is a non-moderate word and are there grammar rules for the treatment of such words? For example, are italics never used for emphasis with "everything," which I've been told is an example of a non-...
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2answers
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What (or who) is the rival gang of the Jets?

Is a gang (or a musical group) considered like a person or an object? I.e. should I ask: Who is the rival gang of the Jets? Or should it be: What is the rival gang of the Jets? What is ...
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1answer
22k views

Correct usage of “of which”

I have two books, of which one is borrowed. Is this correct? Is there such a phrase?
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18 views

Should I use an objective pronoun or reflexive pronoun here?

In the sentence, "It reminds me of_." Does one use an objective pronoun, "It reminds me of me." Or a reflexive pronoun, "It reminds me of myself." I would think you would use an objective pronoun ...
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Is it incorrect to say, 'Give me it'?

Is it incorrect to say, 'Give me it' ? I am told that it is and one should always say, 'Give it me'?
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153 views

Microsoft word and confusion about himself/he/him

I am writing a small essay and I am confused about how to how to properly express this particular sentence below: Chapter 11 begins with the saint chastising the king who was thinking himself to be ...
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2answers
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Which is correct: “for you who loves knowledge” or “for you who love knowledge”?

In this case, the "you" is singular. Further, does adding a comma after "you" make a difference? Thanks.