A pronoun is a word that can function by itself as a noun phrase.

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Is “who all is” grammatically correct?

I often tend to say something like Who all is coming to the movies? And my friends correct me that I should be saying Who all are coming to the movies? So which one is correct?
19
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8answers
157k views

Which is correct, “you and I” or “you and me”?

When the phrase is used as an object, why so many native speakers are saying "you and I" instead of "you and me"? I'm not a native speaker but I thought "you and me" is correct. Not sure if this falls ...
1
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3answers
39 views

When “who” is an antecedent, does it need to directly touch the person it's referring to?

When who is an antecedent, does it need to directly touch the person it's referring to? For example: I called Sally, who urged me to move in with her in Texas. OR I called Sally, the mother ...
0
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0answers
30 views

Active Voice in Research Without Personal Pronoun

I am trying to write a document in an active voice. I am allowed to use personal pronouns. That being said, I feel like I am using "we" too much. I am trying to vary sentence structure so that each ...
0
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3answers
63 views

Interesting: What's wrong with this sentence

"Born of Ibuza parents in Nigeria, novelist Buchi Emeta moved to England in 1962, since which she has lived in North London." The part in bold should be corrected/improved-accroding to the SAT mcq ...
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1answer
57 views

possible ambiguity of 'he' when two nouns are in use

I want to express that Brahma explained to Indra the mistake Indra had committed. Is it proper to say it like this? Brahma explained to Indra the mistake he had committed. Is there any ...
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1answer
102 views

Cohesive devices

Hi I'm analysing an old advertisement at the moment. Below's a picture of it, I'm stumped on one thing. Can someone tell me if the pronouns 'you' and 'your' are anaphoric references or exophoric ...
3
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2answers
114 views

“Nobody but him was present.” or “Nobody but he was present.” [duplicate]

Nobody but him was present. Nobody but he was present. Which is the correct usage and why?
6
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3answers
755 views

“Nobody will help you but me” vs. “Nobody will help you but I”

As has been shown in another question, in comparisons with than both the accusative and the nominative are possible and grammatical: He loves you more than I. He loves you more than me. ...
3
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1answer
77 views

“There is the man.” Is *there* an adverb or pronoun?

According to Dictionary.com there adverb in or at that place (opposed to here ): She is there now. pronoun (used to introduce a sentence or clause in which ...
0
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2answers
57 views

Is a human corpse still refered as he/she?

Lately one of thoughts turned morbid: would a person refer to a corpse as an object (it), or do corpses follow the general he/she/it rules of Animals vs. People? My thoughts stem from the fact that a ...
1
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1answer
139 views

Question tag for “many a …”

Consider the sentence "Many a rose bloomed in the garden." If you had to substitute "many a rose" with a pronoun, what would it be? "Many a ..." takes a singular verb. Does that mean it can be ...
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0answers
18 views

Why isn't the nominative case generally used with “to be”? [duplicate]

In German, constructions with sein, which is uninflected infinitive meaning "to me", seem to generally use the nominative case. For instance, this is a dog translates to das ist ein Hund, and ein here ...
2
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4answers
140 views

Using “one” in a sentence multiple times, does it sound right?

I just came across the following sentence in the book "The theory of everything": If one keeps traveling in a certain direction on the surface of the Earth, one never comes up against an ...
0
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0answers
15 views

Each of with plural or singular pronoun [duplicate]

In the sentence "Each of the Parisian five-star properties has THEIR own distinguished style". Shouldn't it be "...its own..."?
2
votes
1answer
67 views

Does an inverted protasis mean just plain “if”, or does it mean “even if”?

When the first part of a conditional’s if-clause is inverted and the if consequently dropped, is the missing if just a plain old “simple if”, or is it more of an “even if”? For example, in this ...
0
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1answer
54 views

She showed me it [duplicate]

What is grammatically wrong with saying, "She showed me it." I know that should be showed it to me but I can't think of the reason the first is wrong. Thank you.
4
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2answers
84 views

Object pronoun: me and John, or John and me?

When using ourselves and another person as the subject of a sentence, we use their name first (like "John and I"); but when the same two people become the object of a sentence, which order should the ...
2
votes
1answer
35 views

Can I Switch from “it” to “he” or “she” when referring to an animal in a story? [closed]

This one is a question I can't seem to find an answer for. I do have a friend, a professional editor, who told me she saw no problem with me switching from "it" to "he" or "she" when referring to an ...
0
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1answer
31 views

Pronoun-antecedent agreement question

I was reading this article about jokes on 30 Rock. A sentence seemed strange to me, and I had to reread a few times. They are talking about a writer, Robert Carlock, writing jokes for a character, Dr. ...
3
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1answer
107 views

Is this just a peculiarity of the specific text, or does the disuse of “‑self” to indicate the reflexive here speak to broader trends?

In the 1917 JPS translation of the Hebrew Bible, we have, in Ecclesiastes 2: I made me great works; I builded me houses; I planted me vineyards; I made me gardens and parks, and I planted trees in ...
0
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1answer
95 views

What types of words/phrases are “this” “here” & “they”?

I'm currently doing an analytic essay on my drama coursework (fun.). I'd like to explain how the playwright never reveals the exact setting of the act, by using only phrases such as "this","here", and ...
10
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6answers
819 views

Why does legal English sometimes repeat the antecedent noun after “which”?

Here's a standard English sentence: The folder which is missing from the principal's office contained the answers to today's exam. (Separate question, discussed elsewhere I'm sure, whether it ...
0
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1answer
58 views

Why is omitting “who” correct? [duplicate]

In the following sentence why is omitting "who was" correct? Michelangelo, who was a sculptor, an architect, a painter, and a poet had a great influence on the world of art. to ...
14
votes
4answers
2k views

Is the lowercase pronoun “i” a feature of Indian English?

The Rule The personal pronoun “I” is always capitalized in English, regardless of its position in a sentence. This is an orthographic convention that every native speaker should know. Whenever I ...
0
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1answer
36 views

Object pronouns+verbs+ing

As non native speaker of English , I'm having trouble making sense of a structure pertaining to object pronouns. Likelihood of me doing this.... Your plan involves me attempting to prepare ...
1
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1answer
39 views

Can I use a reflexive pronoun in the same sentence with the person represented by the pronoun?

This is the sentence: The image on the screen stares back at Susan with eerie intensity – it is a picture of herself Microsoft Word would like me to say "her", not "herself".
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2answers
69 views

I looked at the mirror and saw: “me” or “myself”? [closed]

Which one is right to use in the following sentence? I looked at the mirror and saw Me / Myself.
14
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4answers
1k views

How are pronouns resolved?

Are pronouns in English resolved syntactically or semantically? Do they always refer to the closest matching noun? A wikipedia article has these examples: We gave the bananas to the monkeys ...
0
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2answers
401 views

Antecedents of indefinite pronouns

Consider the sentence, "Most of the apples are fresh." Is it incorrect to say that apples is the antecedent of the indefinite pronoun most?
0
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1answer
44 views

'It' referring to a totality of more than just one entity

"My father loved to paint. He was a very accomplished amateur painter. Oils-he painted pictures of abandoned mills, and of barns, and of people and sailboats and lighthouses. All of it was ...
5
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3answers
309 views

Does this sentence require the pronoun 'they'?

I have the following sentence: There were several dominoes—some so precariously placed that I'd swear should have toppled over. I believe it's correct, but when read quickly or out loud, ...
8
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3answers
9k views

What does the “yours” in “yours sincerely” mean?

"Yours" is usually a possessive pronoun with an implicit noun. What is the implicit noun in the case of "yours sincerely"?
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2answers
69 views

Can the pronoun “one” precede the thing it is referring to in a sentence?

I give an example so you understand right away what I'm asking. Does the following sentence sound right: Users are parts of not only the one being discussed right now, but the already-mentioned two ...
3
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2answers
57 views

Possessive of “it” when used as a noun to name itself [closed]

When speaking of the word "it", "it" is a noun and can double as a pronoun for itself. For example, I can say something like the following: It's first letter is an i. Its second letter is a t. ...
1
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1answer
55 views

Which of these two sentences is correct? [duplicate]

I don't like YOU leaving early. I don't like YOUR leaving early.
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0answers
59 views

How refer to the god and devil using pronouns and adverbs?

I'm trying to phrase a sentence where I want to refer to the god and the devil/satan by using a combination of pronouns and adverbs rather than their names or nouns such as "good/evil", "divine power" ...
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2answers
5k views

“Him/Her” vs “Himself/Herself”

As a unit admin I’m often typing award certificates. The last line of the award citation usually goes something like this: Private Joan Smith actions reflect great credit upon herself, the 120th ...
2
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2answers
672 views

Can a “who” act as both a pronoun and a conjunction at the same time?

Example: I will sue the person who murdered my neighbour. In the preceding example, should we treat who as a relative pronoun, a conjunction, or both?
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2answers
145 views

Pronoun reference & other enigmas in a poem by H. D. Thoreau

I'm trying to understand an excerpt from a poem — "Inspiration", by Henry David Thoreau (see below) — but there are two bits I can't quite get. The first confusing part is the verse "and in my day ...
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8answers
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Using “them” instead of “those”

Background: Nowadays, I see this usage a lot. I don't know if it was this common in the past. For example: "one of them people" When I did a research about it, some people say it comes from a ...
2
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1answer
65 views

“Find” as a transitive verb

I know that in this example I find it quite hard to do something the verb "to find" must be followed by the pronoun "it". But what if I say One thing I found "it" to get used to doing is… ...
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2answers
73 views

Personal pronoun before noun? [duplicate]

Before Sarah can board the bus, she needs to get some coins for the fare. Before she can board the bus, Sarah needs to get some coins for the fare. My questions are: Between the above ...
0
votes
1answer
120 views

Meaning of “it” in “it [. . .] settled into its unbreakable parts”

Please help me understand the meaning of “settled into its unbreakable parts” as used in this excerpt below from Flannery O’Connor’s The Violent Bear It Away: He was sitting forward on the seat, ...
6
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2answers
289 views

Antecedent of “which” in “A man coming out of the backdoor of his house which is facing east”

In a recent quiz there was a question: A man coming out of the backdoor of his house which is facing east... In this scenario, should I understand the meaning to be 'the house is facing east,' ...
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votes
2answers
352 views

Ambiguity in use of relative pronouns

The animal ate the father of Jay, who was an engineer. So who is the engineer here? Father or Jay? How can I use which, that, who to refer to the whole object or only to parts of the object?
1
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2answers
135 views

Antecedent of “its” in “the dog attacked the cat and its friends” [duplicate]

The dog attacked the cat and its friends. Does the sentence imply that the dog attacked the cat and the cat's friends, or that it attacked the cat and the dog's friends? How would one properly ...
0
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1answer
105 views

Inexplicable 'it'

I have myself used and been OK with it in sentences like: What is it that you're doing? What is it that it means? But now I can't quite understand why it is necessary here. Also a ...
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1answer
519 views

Can the antecedent ever be in a prepositional phrase?

It seems like a basic concept, but I want to make sure. Can the antecedent ever be in a prepositional phrase? For example: Jill likes running with Julie. She is a good person. Does she refer to ...
2
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4answers
153 views

Antecedent of “it” in “it fared with him as with the storm-tossed ship” in context

When on that shivering winter's night, the Pequod thrust her vindictive bows into the cold malicious waves, who should I see standing at her helm but Bulkington! I looked with sympathetic awe and ...