A pronoun is a word that can function by itself as a noun phrase.

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Proper use of pronouns and conjunctions

Could someone please verify the grammar in this sentence? Particularly the use of 'her' (should it be she?) and the implied 'her' after the and. Should there be a second 'her'? "They sought treatment ...
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“This summer” versus “last summer” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Which day does “next Tuesday” refer to? This is October. We went to the hill station this year's (2012) summer. Now, how do I say this to others. I have been saying this ...
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4answers
364 views

Should I use a pronoun in the second sentence? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is it acceptable to omit “I” when it’s the subject? I'm chatting with my friend, and I want to say to him that I want to go to shower and I'll be back soon. What is ...
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“Try forming this shape using [that/it]. [It/that] will match any virus!”

I'm working on a mobile game, and I was wondering about the best way to say the quote below: You see that shiny ball full of colors? Try forming this shape using that. That will match any ...
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1answer
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Usage of “it” pronoun for animals [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Use of “it” and “its” for people and animals I’m an Italian working in an English-speaking company. In school here they usually teach us to refer to animals using the it ...
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“I”, “me” and “myself” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “My friends and I” vs. “My friends and me” vs. “Me and my friends” Can “myself” stand for both “me” and “I” in “my mother and I/me”? ...
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“Thank you for your coming” and “Thank you for your understanding” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Thank you for coming” and “Thank you for your coming” The first one seems ungrammatical, as pointed by some of native speakers. But the latter ...
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“Thank you for coming” and “Thank you for your coming”

Consider "Thank you for coming" and "Thank you for your coming". Would the latter one be grammatical? Why? Is it possible to recognize latter "coming" as noun? Some say you need no pronoun because it ...
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297 views

Proper usage of pronouns

As an ESL student, sometimes I wonder whether I use too many pronouns. For example: She grabbed her purse, she took some money and then she went to buy some groceries. After that she returned ...
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“Whoever” Vs. “Whomever”

On the subject of "whoever" and "whomever", I was reading this but I am still confused: http://www.grammarbook.com/grammar/whoever.asp What is the correct use of whoever/whomever in the following ...
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When to use “we” and “us” — specific SAT example [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: I can run faster than _. (1) him (2) he? I am confused about the usage of the words 'we' and 'us'. I am using a Princeton Review 11 SAT tests 2011 edition, practice test ...
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4answers
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Why “me” instead of “my” in pirate speech?

I don’t understand the usage in constructions like “Spare meself, me ship, me crew” in Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s End. Is it a dialect or “bloody pirate’s speech” or what?
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Repeating “I” in an enumeration of attributes

Since I like staying up until late at night, waking up late, and generally [I] am more of a nocturnal type of person… Is the I in the square brackets necessary, or can it be omitted? Personally, I ...
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3k views

Everyone Else's Lives

It would seem as though this is incorrect, since we each only have one life. Is my intuition correct that it should be everyone else's life and not everyone else's lives?
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536 views

Can a “who” act as both a pronoun and a conjunction at the same time?

Example: I will sue the person who murdered my neighbour. In the above example, should we treat who as a relative pronoun, a conjunction, or both?
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How did the practice of identifying an object after using a pronoun evolve?

While watching Barclay's Premier League matches on the Fox Soccer Channel, the announcers often identify an object by name immediately after using a pronoun. For example, in a match occuring right ...
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“What day is it today?” vs. “What day is today?”

Which of the following is grammatical? What date/day is it today? What date/day is today?
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Personal pronouns for animals

In my native language German, every animal has an article. This is understandable, if one wants for example to distinguish a male pig (boar) from a female pig (sow). But if one just talks about the ...
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Choosing between 'I' and 'me' [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Which is correct, “you and I” or “you and me”? Which one is correct to say: “It's me” or “It's I”? “It is ...
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4answers
604 views

Is there a name for the practice of dropping pronouns in written speech?

I’m specifically thinking about emails I receive all day where someone will write: Haven’t seen it yet. Will respond when received. If it were spoken, we would certainly hear: I haven’t ...
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“He is better than _____.” (1) I (2) I am?

Which of the following constructions is / are correct? He is better than I. He is better than I am. PS: I'm unfamiliar with this site and its workings, so forgive me if my question fails to follow ...
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'Him or herself' v. 'himself or herself'?

I was reading this article on the New York Times. This sentence caused me some confusion: But what I’m teaching are topics such as 5th-century Indian theories of logical inference, or the ...
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Do we use “which” or “that” when referring to the preceding main clause as a whole?

Sorry, I don't think I can use all the grammatical terms right, so I'll illustrate: Peptide adsorption curves may cross [...] results in the inversion of peptide elution order. I've found a ...
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Identifying the implied gender of nouns [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Referring to objects as “she” English officially does not have genders like German or other languages; for example, a chair is an it, not a he or she. ...
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She/he to refer a user [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Reason for the current trend to use «she» as the gender-neutral pronoun? Can the feminine pronouns be gender-neutral? Is there a correct gender-neutral, singular ...
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What's the deal with exophoric pronoun references?

I have been reading about errors with exophoric pronoun references (the paper was mostly aimed at preparing one for a certain standardized test), and found the author saying "In the context of this ...
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“See you all” or “see you everyone”

When leaving from work, how to say "see you" to colleagues? Which one is appropriate, "see you all" or "see you everyone"?
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Wrong usage of “myself ”, or just putting emphasis on “me”?

I was writing the following sentence, and I realized it somehow sounds odd: I am constantly trying to remind myself to think carefully before speaking, but those moments I forget to do so end up ...
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Why 'a friend of mine' is not 'my friend's friend'?

I have some questions about the expression "a friend of mine" and I'm quite confused with it. Actually I have found some threads about this topic but they don't hit my point. I'm not a native English ...
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Is this sentence correct in grammar and does it even make sense [closed]

This sentence: You have the right to ask for someone in the United States of America. Does it have any grammatical errors? Does it even make sense? I think it is usually ...to ask for ...
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Do the adjectives always precedes the noun or pronoun? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why do some adjectives follow the nouns they modify? Attributive and predicative position of an adjective “A place nearby” but not “A place good” ...
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Which pronoun should be used with “anyone”? “They” or “you”?

Sample sentence: If anyone has the files, could (they or you) please upload them to a file-hosting website? Context: I am writing an email to a group of people requesting that if anyone has the files ...
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“…and me” or “me and…” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Me and my wife” or “my wife and me” I keep seeing that it's just courtesy to put yourself last in a list of nouns. eg. "They went to the game ...
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Using both “one’s” and “their” to refer to the same entity

Consider this example: Sustainability management in large organisations is an important activity that helps to achieve one’s business goals while at the same time reducing their environmental ...
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Which pronoun refers to a group such as an orchestra — “they” or “it”?

Which pronoun should be used to refer to, say, an orchestra? Does it go on concert tours, or do they? Intuitively I’d go for “they”, but intuition is known to fail…
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Pronouns for collective nouns (British and American)

British and American English differ in the way they conjugate verbs for collective nouns: http://languagelog.ldc.upenn.edu/nll/?p=877. For example, an American would probably say "China is winning" ...
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How exactly does one determine when to use I or Me? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Should I say “not I” or “not me”? I got into a good argument with myself when a Lecturer asked: "Who said that?" and I replied "I." ...
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T-V distinction

In many languages, there is such thing as T-V distinction. Basically, it's when you use different pronouns in "formal" (or "polite") speech, and in informal speech. Now, I do realize there is no ...
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Using “I” or “we” to refer to sole proprietorship?

I have a company which consists of only myself. The company has its own distinct name which is registered. Should I use "I" or "we" to refer to my own sole proprietorship when writing marketing ...
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“Its” as a Possessive Pronoun

Since its can be both determiner possessive pronoun and nominal possessive pronoun, an example of its as determiner possessive pronoun would be: We saved this question for last because of its ...
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What is the difference between “this” and “that” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Using “that” and “this” interchangeably Is there a clear delineation between the usages of 'this' and 'that' in American English? ...
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How to form sentences starting with “it”

I would like to learn how to reconstruct this sentence to use it at the beginning: The reason why they chose this way looks weird to me. I think we could form it as follows, but of course I am ...
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Proper usage of 'which' in a sentence

I read the post Usage of "which", and am trying to frame my own sentence that uses "which". Consider the sentences below. In the first, I want to say that variable shadowing is the reason ...
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Use of possessive or object pronoun [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When is a gerund supposed to be preceded by a possessive pronoun? Do you mind me smoking? Do you mind my smoking? There's little chance of you ...
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701 views

A general rule for using “that” and “it” [closed]

Consider the following examples: I know [that/it]. What is [that/it)]? [That/It] is more than I wanted. To know how you are, [that/it] is more important. Based on my ...
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855 views

Peculiar vs peculiar to itself

What is the difference between the following statements? Most men have peculiar manners. Most men have manners peculiar to themselves.
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'Their' singular or plural? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is there a correct gender-neutral, singular pronoun (“his” versus “her” versus “their”)? 'Their' is a third person plural; however, ...
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Why does legal English sometimes repeat the antecedent noun after “which”?

Here's a standard English sentence: The folder which is missing from the principal's office contained the answers to today's exam. (Separate question, discussed elsewhere I'm sure, whether it ...
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The general 'it' [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What does “it” refer to in “it's raining”? Whence the “it” in “I like it here”? What is the grammatical term for ...
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Correct usage of “of which”

I have two books, of which one is borrowed. Is this correct? Is there such a phrase?