A pronoun is a word that can function by itself as a noun phrase.

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Microsoft word and confusion about himself/he/him

I am writing a small essay and I am confused about how to how to properly express this particular sentence below: Chapter 11 begins with the saint chastising the king who was thinking himself to be ...
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367 views

Did English ever have Distinct Inclusive and Exclusive 1st Person Plural Pronouns?

I have always had trouble when people talk to me and say "we" - because I often don't know whether that includes me or not. "Hey, we're going to the movies." Just by that, how do I know if they want ...
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“I myself Naresh” as an introduction

I have heard so many times that before starting presentation people introduce themselves like this: I myself Naresh and the topic I am going to present is.... Myself Naresh and the topic I am ...
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2k views

Ourselves vs us?

I am simply haunted by the fear of my family not having enough money to support ourselves. I am simply haunted by the fear of my family not having enough money to support us. The ...
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118 views

Pronouns of “somebody”, “anybody”, etc

I am a little confused about the usage of pronouns. I often see people using "their" with words that seem to be singular, for example, "somebody" and "anybody", which looks weird to me. (I.e., one ...
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Addressing someone with no specified gender [duplicate]

How do you address someone whose gender is not specified, when you are writing something? Take this as an example: The teacher said we should go; ____ said we are good pupils. Would you insert ...
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3k views

Jim and Myself? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When is it correct to use “yourself” and “myself” (versus “you” and “me”)? Doubt about the subject in this phrase: I, me, or myself? Use of “myself” in business-speak ...
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“He is better than _____.” (1) I (2) I am?

Which of the following constructions is / are correct? He is better than I. He is better than I am. PS: I'm unfamiliar with this site and its workings, so forgive me if my question fails to follow ...
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307 views

Is it “me” or “I” and why? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When do I use “I” instead of “me?”   John, Valencia, and I (or me)? I found a photo of Sarah, Thomas, James and I? OR I found a photo of ...
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110 views

The condition for saying “You’re the door on the right.” etc. and its construction

This question is a spin-off from “Is you’re the door on the right. grammatically correct?” . After the original question, some ideas came to me, about its conditions and construction. I opened this ...
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Possessive for a third person and a first person

Bob and I are working on a project. I want to refer to "Bob's work" and "my work" collectively, without referring to Bob and myself collectively. (This will be the first reference to Bob and myself in ...
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Case of Pronoun [duplicate]

I want to know _ you talked to. (who or whom) I want to know _ the culprit is. (who or whom)
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Tricky pronoun and antecedent agreement

I'm currently taking a grammar class and the professor gave us this phrase to ponder upon. She said that there was a problem with it. I can't seem to find the problem nor the solution. Manolette ...
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140 views

Meaning of “that” in “holomorphic function in the sector S that is continuous”

I have encountered a confusing sentence in a math textbook: Suppose F is a holomorphic function in the sector S that is continuous on the closure of S. What does that mean in the above ...
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2answers
284 views

Determining pronoun antecedents

What is the antecedent of the relative pronoun who in the following sentence? Hector Berlioz is one of those French composers who is famous for his operatic music. Is it one or is it composers? ...
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3k views

“These stuff” vs. “this stuff” [closed]

I wrote “I know all these stuff; I don’t have to go over them again” in my writing-exam paper and the teacher corrected it to read, “I know all this stuff; I don’t have to go over it again.” The ...
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977 views

Is the sentence “Whose your daddy” interchangeable with “Who's your daddy”?

Me and a friend are arguing about this case and I'm trying to make the point that a sentence such as: Whose your daddy Is incorrect because the pronoun whose means of which and not who is. My ...
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213 views

“You and I” versus “you and me” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Which is correct, “you and I” or “you and me”? When I was in primary school, I was advised by my English teacher to use "you and I" instead of ...
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157 views

What does “which” refer to in “in respect to which”? [closed]

From footnote 34 on page 216 of Thinking Like a Lawyer by Frederick Schauer:  . . . it is accepted that individuals have due-process rights to notice and hearing [//] with respect to ...
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352 views

Ambiguity in use of relative pronouns

The animal ate the father of Jay, who was an engineer. So who is the engineer here? Father or Jay? How can I use which, that, who to refer to the whole object or only to parts of the object?
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Difference between “anyone” and “everyone”? [duplicate]

What's the difference between anyone and everyone? Everyone should keep quiet in the classroom. Anyone should keep quiet in the classroom.
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1answer
48 views

Usage question about plural pronouns [closed]

Is there a great deal of difference in meaning between the following sentences? These looked very different. They looked very different. They seem the same to me, but perhaps I am ...
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482 views

Singular or plural pronoun for an antecedent of the form “A, B, or C”?

The number, gender, and person of a pronoun must match its closest antecedent. Most style manuals advise using a singular possessive pronoun when the antecedent is a disjunctive set of singular nouns: ...
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Confusion regarding “I” and “me” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: I can run faster than _. (1) him (2) he? Which one is correct? He is taller than I. He is taller than me.