A pronoun is a word that can function by itself as a noun phrase.

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1answer
770 views

Between friend and acquaintance? [closed]

What do I call people in between friends and acquaintance? I want to refer to my classmates who I know somewhat well and are friendly with, but not friends.
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1answer
336 views

Can the antecedent ever be in a prepositional phrase?

It seems like a basic concept, but I want to make sure. Can the antecedent ever be in a prepositional phrase? For example: Jill likes running with Julie. She is a good person. Does she refer to ...
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3answers
338 views

“I like it that” vs. “I like that”

I want to express the following: You are blaming me for your lack of concern and I like that (in a sarcastic way). Which one of the following sentences would be correct? I like it that your ...
2
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2answers
1k views

“They are…” vs. “these are” when answering the question “What are these…?”

When asked, "What are these called in English?" or similar, should we use just the right pronoun or can we also answer with the right demonstrative pronoun? For example, which is grammatical or ...
0
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2answers
51 views

Why is “you cannot buy all what you like” wrong? [duplicate]

I got the following sentences from http://www.engvid.com/english-resource/50-common-grammar-mistakes-in-english-2/ Wrong: You cannot buy all what you like! Right: You cannot buy all that you ...
1
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2answers
739 views

Either + plural noun + plural verb

I know that "either" is singular as is "neither". But I've seen it used as a plural pronoun. Take this sentence for example: It's the only chance either of us have of getting home. Is this usage ...
0
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2answers
175 views

Which is correct: “for you who loves knowledge” or “for you who love knowledge”?

In this case, the "you" is singular. Further, does adding a comma after "you" make a difference? Thanks.
1
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1answer
225 views

Possessive pronouns in research papers [closed]

Contrast: In order to develop a relationship between the energy spectra and their corresponding Fourier transforms... with In order to develop a relationship between the energy spectra and ...
2
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1answer
82 views

What does the “either” in this sentence mean?

The whole paragraph is like this: An experiment has three possible outcomes, l, J, and K. The probabilities of the outcomes are 0.25, 0.35, and 0.40, respectively. If the experiment is to be ...
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2answers
1k views

Noun order: “He and we…” or “We and he…”? Similarly, “…him and us” or “…us and him”?

It's convention and polite to always list yourself last in a list. I say "John and I went to the store" and not "I and John went to the store." So does that mean that I should always list myself ...
2
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1answer
58 views

'Those that couldn't let go' [closed]

"Those that couldn't let go" is the title of a quest in an online MMPORG. Is this correct or should it be "Those whom..." or "They that ..."?
0
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2answers
216 views

Other/the other confusion in a sentence

Consider the following sentence (it is a real medical condition) These people have blue skin. We should let them get in touch with other sufferers. I would prefer using the other sufferers as ...
0
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1answer
242 views

Using “their” vs. “his” [duplicate]

Why do we use their instead of his in this sentence? another driver flashes their lights
0
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2answers
466 views

Others or the others in this example

The goal of ABC is to enable the doctors all around the world to share and benefit from the knowledge of (the) others. (meaning of other doctors all around the world) I know that THE OTHERS ...
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2answers
94 views

Case of Pronoun [duplicate]

I want to know _ you talked to. (who or whom) I want to know _ the culprit is. (who or whom)
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1answer
245 views

The significance of “y”

Regarding the pronoun "your", ignoring the singular possessive form. Is there some significance to the "prefix" y or is this a coincidence? Our: Collective possession, including me. Y our: ...
2
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2answers
213 views

Reflexive pronouns and understood “to be”

So, I've got a fairly straightforward sentence: Poe did not think himself a writer of inferior material. It is my understanding that "a writer of inferior material" is the object of the ...
0
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1answer
543 views

Usage of “other” with singular nouns

Reading an English textbook and learning stuff, they mention that that "other" is used only with plural or uncountable nouns. But what about this? There is no other way..no other option. Car ends ...
3
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1answer
142 views

Is 'somelike' a word?

Never mind the laconic title. It's incontrovertibly a word. What I'd like to know is whether the little bugger has ever been recorded by lexicographers. I've ruffled a dozen dictionaries to no avail, ...
0
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4answers
927 views

It is us? It is we? [duplicate]

Which would it be--it is us, or it is we? "Who is the real culprit? It is us, the ignorant, apathetic people of America." Or, "Who is the real culprit? It is we, the ignorant, apathetic people of ...
3
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3answers
287 views

Is “It must be him with whom you enjoy doing your assignments, not me” correct? [duplicate]

I’d like all of you to please consider the following sentence: It must be him with whom you enjoy doing your assignments, not me. I have known that after 'to be' verb pronouns words take the ...
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0answers
33 views

illiterate use of pronoun [duplicate]

I heard a movie character say, "I smell ME a rat." I know that the use of "me" is not standard English. What is the grammatical explanation for the insertion of "me" in that kind of sentence?
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4answers
81 views

Can a personal pronoun refer to a subject that is never explicitly mentioned?

I'm having trouble accepting as legitimate this sentence: "In her new book, Jane Doe's sister Sally struggles with poverty." (This was offered as correct in a tutoring guide to SAT Writing Section.) ...
4
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1answer
13k views

Is it correct to say “I myself”?

I thought it was incorrect to say I myself as in: I myself don’t like this idea. However, last night I was watching the second Harry Potter movie, and one of the characters said: In case you ...
1
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1answer
102 views

What does “the us’es” mean?

What is the meaning of us’es in this passage below? The only thing they have to look forward to is hope. And you have to give them hope. Hope for a better world, hope for a better tomorrow, hope ...
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0answers
42 views

Using “they” for single person [duplicate]

I have encountered some people using pronoun "they" when referring to a single person, such in this example: Even if the cyclist is 100% at fault (I don't think they are), leaving the scene of ...
0
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4answers
161 views

“Makes them difficult to simulate” vs “makes it difficult to simulate them”

Which statement is correct? The complexity of these systems makes them difficult to simulate on computers. The complexity of these systems makes it difficult to simulate them on computers. ...
0
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3answers
895 views

Using “it” multiple times in a sentence

From http://meta.stackexchange.com/questions/194744/change-wording-of-unclear-what-youre-asking The current description of "unclear what you're asking" misuses the pronoun "it" in the second ...
2
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1answer
574 views

Possessive pronouns vs possessive determiners

If my understanding is correct, the possessive personal pronouns (which are mine, thine, yours, his, hers, its, ours, and theirs) are used in place of nouns, whereas the possessive determiners (which ...
2
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1answer
82 views

Possessive pronoun drops in fiction [closed]

Assuming the reader knows who is being referred to, what do you think is the effect on the reader when possessive pronouns are dropped in fiction. For example: Brown hair is pulled back into a ...
3
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2answers
2k views

Why is there an 'it' in “I find it very difficult to do this”?

I find it strange that one has to use the pronoun it in sentences like I find it very difficult to do this. I would like to know the grammatical reason (if there is one) for this, if it has ...
1
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1answer
650 views

“Vendors and consultants, each of which” or “… each of whom”? [duplicate]

Which is correct: Sources of information include vendors and consultants, each of which usually has an interest in selling something. Sources of information include vendors and consultants, ...
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2answers
116 views

“Which professors…” or “Whom professors…”? [closed]

Which one is correct? Which professors do you recommend? Whom professors do you recommend?
3
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2answers
463 views

passive Vs active or omission of 'which is'

What is the part of speech of 'regarded' in the following? "a quality of beauty and intensity of emotion regarded as characteristic of poems" (NOAD) Why isn't it "... [which is] regarded ..."? ...
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2answers
229 views

May I please help who(m)ever is next [duplicate]

I am bringing up a rather pedantic point here, but, one that has me completely stumped. This is going to require some serious grammar knowledge. I was in a line at a shop today and the teenager at ...
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0answers
147 views

Is “Whom you are singing for?” correct? [duplicate]

Sorry I am not a native English speaker but in an English language country. My colleague was singing and just to kid her I said: Whom you are singing for (I wanted to say to her, for who she is ...
0
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3answers
277 views

Tricky pronoun and antecedent agreement

I'm currently taking a grammar class and the professor gave us this phrase to ponder upon. She said that there was a problem with it. I can't seem to find the problem nor the solution. Manolette ...
7
votes
2answers
158 views

What is the proper way to refer to the Original Poster (OP)?

In a Stack Exchange comment, I was corrected by referring to a user named alice as a "he". I said (context): I know he thinks he needs all of the eigenvalues, but I've learned that ... and was ...
1
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2answers
226 views

objective/subjective pronouns following a verb and before another verb

A grammar exercise says that this is correct: "The final choice made Heather and I change our decision." Why is the pronoun "I" correct when, if you dropped "Heather and" and changed "our" to "my" ...
4
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2answers
4k views

When is (it) a good time to call you?

When is it a good time to call you? When is a good time to call you? Everybody tells me that both are correct. What is the exact grammatical difference?
2
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3answers
826 views

“What am I” vs. “who am I”

Yesterday I was going through my son's books and at one place it was written I have a long neck, I have spots on my body — what am I? I thought it should have been I have a long neck, ...
0
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1answer
62 views

reflexive pronoun use [duplicate]

Which is better? "You" vs. "Yourself" (referring to God) "Draw us close to You." or "Draw us close to Yourself." "Bring us back to You." or "Bring us back to Yourself."
0
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1answer
462 views

Using nominative “I” instead of objective “me” in plural phrases [duplicate]

I hear people saying, "He said it to my wife and I" when they would never say, "He said it to I." Why are people so inconsistent?
3
votes
2answers
135 views

Using “with” without an object pronoun?

Growing up I had a friend whose family would constantly say "Are you going with?" or similar. It always annoyed me. Fast forward 20 years and now I have a coworker who does the same. "I'm going to ...
4
votes
4answers
433 views

Can we use two pronouns side by side?

While writing an essay, I felt the need to write two "her"s simultaneously: Jane had taken the book from Ann five months ago, and hence felt the need to return her her book as soon as possible. ...
0
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3answers
414 views

It is just like him to be late

What a strange construction is it? Why does it sound so strange to me, Ukrainian fella? For instance, why "him" instead of "he". And, first of all, what does it mean? I even cannot translate it ...
4
votes
1answer
235 views

Why have some plural pronouns replaced singular pronouns?

While today we use for example the word "you" for second person singular and plural in objective and subjective manner, there were actually words to differentiate this usages like "thou" and "thee", ...
0
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1answer
73 views

Use of “a user” as the antedecent of “they” [duplicate]

Is it correct to say "The list of reports a user will see may depend on the permissions group(s) they are in."? I have asked the writer to change the text to say "users" to match "they", but he is ...
9
votes
1answer
527 views

When did it become incorrect to use apostrophes with possessive pronouns?

I'm reading Jane Austen's Sense and Sensibility, and I notice that she invariably uses an apostrophe with possessive pronouns — in a way that would be considered incorrect now. For example: (Elinor is ...
8
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2answers
396 views

“Each” — pronoun or adverb

I am looking at these two sentences: M and W are letters that each have 4 strokes. M and W are letters and each has 4 strokes. It seems that each is an adverb in (1) but a pronoun in ...