A pronoun is a word that can function by itself as a noun phrase.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

0
votes
3answers
266 views

Is a human corpse still refered as he/she?

Lately one of thoughts turned morbid: would a person refer to a corpse as an object (it), or do corpses follow the general he/she/it rules of Animals vs. People? My thoughts stem from the fact that a ...
1
vote
0answers
21 views

Why isn't the nominative case generally used with “to be”? [duplicate]

In German, constructions with sein, which is uninflected infinitive meaning "to me", seem to generally use the nominative case. For instance, this is a dog translates to das ist ein Hund, and ein here ...
0
votes
0answers
44 views

Each of with plural or singular pronoun [duplicate]

In the sentence "Each of the Parisian five-star properties has THEIR own distinguished style". Shouldn't it be "...its own..."?
0
votes
1answer
260 views

She showed me it [duplicate]

What is grammatically wrong with saying, "She showed me it." I know that should be showed it to me but I can't think of the reason the first is wrong. Thank you.
3
votes
1answer
305 views

Can I Switch from “it” to “he” or “she” when referring to an animal in a story? [closed]

This one is a question I can't seem to find an answer for. I do have a friend, a professional editor, who told me she saw no problem with me switching from "it" to "he" or "she" when referring to an ...
2
votes
2answers
669 views

Object pronoun: me and John, or John and me?

When using ourselves and another person as the subject of a sentence, we use their name first (like "John and I"); but when the same two people become the object of a sentence, which order should the ...
0
votes
1answer
88 views

Pronoun-antecedent agreement question

I was reading this article about jokes on 30 Rock. A sentence seemed strange to me, and I had to reread a few times. They are talking about a writer, Robert Carlock, writing jokes for a character, Dr. ...
0
votes
1answer
100 views

Why is omitting “who” correct? [duplicate]

In the following sentence why is omitting "who was" correct? Michelangelo, who was a sculptor, an architect, a painter, and a poet had a great influence on the world of art. to ...
2
votes
1answer
97 views

Does an inverted protasis mean just plain “if”, or does it mean “even if”?

When the first part of a conditional’s if-clause is inverted and the if consequently dropped, is the missing if just a plain old “simple if”, or is it more of an “even if”? For example, in this ...
0
votes
1answer
294 views

Object pronouns+verbs+ing

As non native speaker of English , I'm having trouble making sense of a structure pertaining to object pronouns. Likelihood of me doing this.... Your plan involves me attempting to prepare ...
1
vote
1answer
66 views

Can I use a reflexive pronoun in the same sentence with the person represented by the pronoun?

This is the sentence: The image on the screen stares back at Susan with eerie intensity – it is a picture of herself Microsoft Word would like me to say "her", not "herself".
18
votes
5answers
3k views

Is the lowercase pronoun “i” a feature of Indian English?

The Rule The personal pronoun “I” is always capitalized in English, regardless of its position in a sentence. This is an orthographic convention that every native speaker should know. Whenever I ...
0
votes
2answers
396 views

I looked at the mirror and saw: “me” or “myself”? [closed]

Which one is right to use in the following sentence? I looked at the mirror and saw Me / Myself.
3
votes
1answer
122 views

Is this just a peculiarity of the specific text, or does the disuse of “‑self” to indicate the reflexive here speak to broader trends?

In the 1917 JPS translation of the Hebrew Bible, we have, in Ecclesiastes 2: I made me great works; I builded me houses; I planted me vineyards; I made me gardens and parks, and I planted trees in ...
3
votes
2answers
116 views

Possessive of “it” when used as a noun to name itself [closed]

When speaking of the word "it", "it" is a noun and can double as a pronoun for itself. For example, I can say something like the following: It's first letter is an i. Its second letter is a t. ...
1
vote
1answer
80 views

Which of these two sentences is correct? [duplicate]

I don't like YOU leaving early. I don't like YOUR leaving early.
0
votes
0answers
215 views

How refer to the god and devil using pronouns and adverbs?

I'm trying to phrase a sentence where I want to refer to the god and the devil/satan by using a combination of pronouns and adverbs rather than their names or nouns such as "good/evil", "divine power" ...
2
votes
1answer
111 views

“Find” as a transitive verb

I know that in this example I find it quite hard to do something the verb "to find" must be followed by the pronoun "it". But what if I say One thing I found "it" to get used to doing is… ...
1
vote
2answers
404 views

Personal pronoun before noun? [duplicate]

Before Sarah can board the bus, she needs to get some coins for the fare. Before she can board the bus, Sarah needs to get some coins for the fare. My questions are: Between the above ...
1
vote
2answers
197 views

Usage of possessive pronouns in subordinate clause or main clause?

To my knowledge, personal pronouns and the noun they represent can be inter-swapped. So both these sentences are correct. (I may be wrong, I'm not sure.) "Unless she arrives here early, Susan will be ...
-1
votes
1answer
289 views

It wasn't someone or I vs. It wasn't me or someone (usage in denial statement) [duplicate]

If one was to state that neither him or another person committed a certain act, how would that be phrased with proper grammar? ex. Who broke that window? It wasn't me or Steve. vs. It wasn't Steve ...
0
votes
1answer
54 views

What does the “it” replace in this passage from a Murakami short story?

I would like some help with what the word it in the paragraph below (with emphasis added; the word is not emphasized in this way in the original). Does it refer to the TV or the antenna outlet? The ...
2
votes
1answer
183 views

Why are plural pronouns used for a singular third person? [duplicate]

My initial concept was: One should finish one's meal. When a user logs in to his/her email... A person bought a cake for his/her work. However, in the recent (8-10) years, I have been ...
4
votes
2answers
301 views

Pronoun reference & other enigmas in a poem by H. D. Thoreau

I'm trying to understand an excerpt from a poem — "Inspiration", by Henry David Thoreau (see below) — but there are two bits I can't quite get. The first confusing part is the verse "and in my day ...
1
vote
1answer
89 views

Can 'him or her' be replaced with 'them'? [duplicate]

One of my friends asked me to solve the following question. The problem is, if you start with the following sentence: He or she wants you to leave him or her alone. Is it OK to replace him or ...
-1
votes
3answers
77 views

“We” or “I”, which pronoun to use [closed]

Three people (including myself) are going to eat kebab. Which of the following is the correct one? We are going to eat kebab with James and Bill. I am going to eat kebab with James and Bill.
0
votes
2answers
419 views

“someone or I” and “me or someone”

I have looked at all the related posts but can't find a definite answer for the following question, so try not to dismiss this as answered: "John or I will get back to you later" "Me or John will get ...
0
votes
3answers
222 views

Use of a pronoun with another person [duplicate]

Which is the correct form? Tommy and she went to the store. OR She and Tommy went to the store. I hear the second example much more frequently in conversation, but I believe the first one is ...
-2
votes
1answer
100 views

Usage question about plural pronouns [closed]

Is there a great deal of difference in meaning between the following sentences? These looked very different. They looked very different. They seem the same to me, but perhaps I am ...
2
votes
0answers
43 views

Formation of Reflexive Pronouns [duplicate]

In English possessive adjectives and reflexive pronouns are I - My - Myself You - Your - Yourself He - His - Himself * She - Her - Herself * It - Its - Itself * They (sing.) - Their - Themself * We ...
4
votes
3answers
229 views

ESL text: “I notice similarities between myself and . . . ”: Acceptable use of reflexive pronoun?

In an ESL class, a student asked a difficult question about the use of “myself” in the following sentence: I notice similarities between myself and other people more than differences. (Speak ...
1
vote
2answers
99 views

Can the pronoun “one” precede the thing it is referring to in a sentence?

I give an example so you understand right away what I'm asking. Does the following sentence sound right: Users are parts of not only the one being discussed right now, but the already-mentioned two ...
3
votes
3answers
2k views

Confused about proper nouns like Dad and Mom [duplicate]

Im confused because well people say that sometimes you use a capital letter in mom and dad. So when do you use capital letters for mom and dad?
2
votes
3answers
608 views

Sentence: use of is/are with you yourself

Can't seem to figure this one out: Of course, it is more difficult to analyze those signs if you yourself is/are stressed beyond belief. Both seem to sound wrong (or maybe I'm overworking). ...
0
votes
2answers
79 views

Avoiding reflexive pronouns

Say, for some reason, it's preferable to avoid pronouns when referring to someone. With most forms of pronouns, it's easy to do so by substituting their name in. Consider: She likes the bread of her ...
2
votes
1answer
894 views

Is “each” an adverb, pronoun, determiner, or what else? [duplicate]

What do Online Dictionaries Say? Cambridge Dictionaries Online says each is used as an adverb in the following examples: There are five leaflets – please take one of each. Each of the brothers ...
0
votes
1answer
149 views

What types of words/phrases are “this” “here” & “they”?

I'm currently doing an analytic essay on my drama coursework (fun.). I'd like to explain how the playwright never reveals the exact setting of the act, by using only phrases such as "this","here", and ...
6
votes
3answers
1k views

Why “themselves” instead of “himself” when referring to third-person singular? [duplicate]

I've read today a comment from a UK user that sounded weird to me: so the OP is shooting themselves in the foot here with the tone then. I would have said instead: so the OP is shooting ...
0
votes
1answer
47 views

“His” or “My” when describing who I am [closed]

I am wondering which of the below sentence is correct... (if there are other errors, please point them out as well) It is because of these experiences that make me who I am today, a leader who ...
2
votes
1answer
96 views

What is the correct pronoun agreement?

I'd like to double check the sentence. What is wrong with this pronoun agreement: Whichever of the six players hit the most home runs, they win the contest. Is it correct?
-2
votes
1answer
40 views

What is the correct pronoun for this?

What is the correct pronoun for this sentence "Each car handles differently, depending on how it is pressed" or is it already correct?
0
votes
2answers
106 views

What is the correct pronoun?

What is the correct pronoun for this sentence "Erica went to get them from the bakery" or is it already correct?
1
vote
1answer
92 views

Pronoun usage: that vs one

I've encountered a sentence on English Wiktionary: The company's 2005 revenue exceeds that of 2004 Can I use one instead of that in the sentence? And that one? And, basically, what is the ...
0
votes
2answers
7k views

“Alex and I” vs. “me and Alex” [duplicate]

Is it improper to say "me and Person X"? I always hear it said as "Person X and I", but have personally learned to say "me and Person X". Is there a difference between the two versions and is one of ...
0
votes
1answer
44 views

What a pronoun should one use: “you” or “yours”? [duplicate]

This document sets out the rights and responsibilities of [you || yours], the Company, and the concerned third parties. If "the Client's rights" can be rephrased to "the rights of Client", then, ...
0
votes
1answer
430 views

subject-verb agreement for singular they [duplicate]

The singular-they is becoming trendy*, and I'm curious about conjugating the verbs for this pronoun. For example, instead of "Jim is over there," is it correct to say "They are over there," or "They ...
4
votes
2answers
253 views

Question tag for “many a …”

Consider the sentence "Many a rose bloomed in the garden." If you had to substitute "many a rose" with a pronoun, what would it be? "Many a ..." takes a singular verb. Does that mean it can be ...
0
votes
0answers
27 views

Demonstrative Pronouns: This/That – Advanced Usage [duplicate]

When you learn about demonstrative pronouns, it seems like a really simple concept. This/these for nearby (physically, or with regards to time), that/those for distant things. Anywhere you go, online ...
0
votes
1answer
617 views

“Your valentine” vs “my valentine”

I am going to send a gift to a far away lady I care a great deal about.I want to write her a card just to tell her I will always be there for her when she needs me, so to speak (not in any sexual ...
1
vote
4answers
343 views

Pronoun for meat: it or some?

I feel the following sentence does not sound usual: I like meat. Can I eat it tonight? I think it is more common to say: I like meat. Can I eat some tonight? Is my understanding correct? ...