A pronoun is a word that can function by itself as a noun phrase.

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Which is correct: “If it were I” or “If it were me”?

I'm fairly sure it's the former, but it sounds even more stilted than the usual cases in which "I" is less common, but more correct.
35
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3answers
4k views

How to pronounce “720p” and “1080p”

How do you pronounce 720p and 1080p? Because I don't live in a country that uses English, I haven't heard it yet. I guess it doesn't have a rule. seven hundred twenty p seven twenty p seventy two ...
9
votes
1answer
745 views

When did it become incorrect to use apostrophes with possessive pronouns?

I'm reading Jane Austen's Sense and Sensibility, and I notice that she invariably uses an apostrophe with possessive pronouns — in a way that would be considered incorrect now. For example: (Elinor is ...
7
votes
1answer
3k views

Using “who” for things (nonliving beings)

On an online typing tutor site I came across the following phrase: We're now going to move on to words who's first letter originates on the top row. Can "who" normally be used in this way (to ...
5
votes
6answers
7k views

Can an independent clause have an implied (or null) subject?

I'm trying to determine whether a clause with an implied subject can be considered independent - specifically in the case of compound sentences. For example: "I was tired, but went to the party ...
2
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1answer
20k views

Correct usage of “of which”

I have two books, of which one is borrowed. Is this correct? Is there such a phrase?
11
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6answers
8k views

“It is me” vs. “It is I”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Which is correct to say: “It's me” or “It's I”? Tonight I watched a movie (The Gospel of John) in which Jesus said (as quoted from the ...
8
votes
3answers
14k views

What does the “yours” in “yours sincerely” mean?

"Yours" is usually a possessive pronoun with an implicit noun. What is the implicit noun in the case of "yours sincerely"?
7
votes
3answers
412 views

Doubt about the subject in this phrase: I, me, or myself?

At the end of the evening, the bar was almost empty, with only [I/?] and a very cheerful and pleasant lady I met in the last minutes of the meeting. What is the correct form in this case? My ...
6
votes
0answers
262 views

Should “none” as a pronoun be used as singular or plural? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: None as plural indefinite pronoun I was programming when it suddenly struck me that I did not know if "none" should be singular or plural. Fore instance, should I write "...
6
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3answers
3k views

“She” or “her” following “no one but”?

Which pronoun is correct in the following sentence? No one but her/she ever made a perfect score on the test The answer according to the book is "her", but it is getting on my nerves. I tried ...
5
votes
2answers
3k views

Referring to oneself and another person at the start of a sentence

Me and Larry had a meeting today. Larry and me had a meeting today. I and Larry had a meeting today. Larry and I had a meeting today. I know the third one is wrong (because it doesn't sound ...
5
votes
2answers
15k views

When is (it) a good time to call you?

When is it a good time to call you? When is a good time to call you? Everybody tells me that both are correct. What is the exact grammatical difference?
5
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1answer
3k views

Is it “a company who makes …” or “a company that makes…”?

Regarding the fact that a company is made up of people and we use who for people, is it proper to use who here?
4
votes
1answer
7k views

“I care for you” versus “I care about you”

I would like to know if there is a semantic difference between I care for you and I care about you.
4
votes
5answers
899 views

“A threat to us people” or “a threat to we people”? [closed]

Which of these is correct: Global warming is a great threat to us people. Global warming is a great threat to we people.
4
votes
1answer
356 views

Is it grammatical to use “same” or “the same” in substitution for an objective pronoun?

I've seen and heard this usage of the pronoun "same" more than once, and it sounded strange to my ears: "Thank you for the book; I will return same shortly." "Wine production has increased, ...
4
votes
4answers
482 views

Why did the KJV use “thou” toward God?

The word "thou" (and similar variations of the Latin tu in other languages) was used between people for informal speech, and talking to people of lower standing. So why did people use it (most ...
3
votes
1answer
2k views

Proper use of I vs me [duplicate]

I stated the following: Angela was reading to Frank and I. Someone corrected me, stating "Frank and me" Which is right?
3
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1answer
542 views

Contemporary written usage of “whom” in objective case [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What's the rule for using “who” or “whom”? I was writing a LinkedIn recommendation one day, and ended up pondering for a while which of these ...
2
votes
2answers
329 views

When must a gerund be preceded by a possessive pronoun as opposed to an accusative one?

I was recently reading this very interesting post here: When is a gerund supposed to be preceded by a possessive pronoun? In this thread, it is argued persuasively that we could use either his or ...
2
votes
2answers
476 views

How should I understand this “that” clause?

The following sentence is from an article of Harry Frankfurt who is a professor from Princeton University: It must be part of the point of saying that humbug is "short of lying," that while it has ...
2
votes
3answers
8k views

Is the usage of “in your humble opinion” correct?

We use "in my humble opinion" to express humility. But I even see usage of "in your humble opinion" to ask for others' opinions. What does it mean? I see the usage in the original message here, ...
2
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2answers
401 views

Is this usage of “whose” correct?

Is the following phrase (grammatically) correct? Bill Gates, whose company is very rich, is famous. (I couldn't come up with a better context-free sample)
1
vote
1answer
950 views

Using nominative “I” instead of objective “me” in plural phrases [duplicate]

I hear people saying, "He said it to my wife and I" when they would never say, "He said it to I." Why are people so inconsistent?
1
vote
1answer
226 views

“Managers are one group to which” vs. “managers are one group to whom”

Which of the following is grammatical? Managers are one group to which these findings are relevant. Managers are one group to whom these findings are relevant.
1
vote
1answer
9k views

How to use it's vs is?

I've seen that people use "how easy is it to […]?" and "how easy is to […]?" Another example could be: I couldn’t ignore the barrage of research showing how easy it is to screw up your kids. ...
1
vote
2answers
486 views

Personal pronoun before noun? [duplicate]

Before Sarah can board the bus, she needs to get some coins for the fare. Before she can board the bus, Sarah needs to get some coins for the fare. My questions are: Between the above two ...
1
vote
3answers
9k views

Should a company be referred to as “he/she” or as “it”?

When a customer represents a company, not a person, and a pronoun is needed to refer back to that customer, should one use he/she, or should one use it?
0
votes
3answers
550 views

Is the use of “who” correct in this sentence?

"The Turk is chess engine who can interact with user interfaces which support Winboard protocol at the moment" I feel that which can be used instead of who but I'm not sure. If that's not correct ...
0
votes
3answers
241 views

Use of a pronoun with another person [duplicate]

Which is the correct form? Tommy and she went to the store. OR She and Tommy went to the store. I hear the second example much more frequently in conversation, but I believe the first one is ...
0
votes
1answer
15k views

“He and I”, “Him and me” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “My friends and I” vs. “My friends and me” vs. “Me and my friends” Somebody taught me a rule of thumb how to discern if I should use "I" or "Me" when adding self to the end ...
-2
votes
1answer
611 views

Singular or plural pronoun for an antecedent of the form “A, B, or C”?

The number, gender, and person of a pronoun must match its closest antecedent. Most style manuals advise using a singular possessive pronoun when the antecedent is a disjunctive set of singular nouns: ...
-3
votes
2answers
953 views

Choosing between 'I' and 'me' [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Which is correct, “you and I” or “you and me”? Which one is correct to say: “It's me” or “It's I”? “It is they ...
13
votes
3answers
45k views

How do you make the possessive form with “He and I”-style subjects? [duplicate]

Despite being a native speaker of American English, I cannot find a construction that sounds natural when trying to form a possessive from coordinated subjects including a first person pronoun, like "...
9
votes
2answers
437 views

Is it ever appropriate to mix up “I” and “one” in the same sentence?

In my last question on English L & U SE, I was strongly tempted to write the following: Every so often I've thought I've chanced across most of them [literary Biblical phrases], but as one ...
9
votes
3answers
667 views

*all of us's friend

There's this funny gap I tried to write a paper once upon a time when I studied linguistics, and I'd like to know if anyone has insight into it. The construction in question is the possessive ...
7
votes
2answers
2k views

“Who are” vs “who is” [closed]

Sentence: it's not what's on the table that matters, but who (is/are) in the chairs. I thought are might be correct because of plural chairs, but family members disagree.
6
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2answers
1k views

Peculiar vs peculiar to itself

What is the difference between the following statements? Most men have peculiar manners. Most men have manners peculiar to themselves.
6
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1answer
262 views

Is this use of whomever correct?

I take pride in my ability to deliver a warm and friendly welcome to whomever I meet. My reasoning is that I am doing the meeting and the object is merely being met, hence whomever.
6
votes
3answers
4k views

“A sensible person like you” vs. “a sensible person like yourself”

What is the difference between you and yourself in the following context? My dear Professor, surely a sensible person like yourself can call him by his name. My dear Professor, surely a ...
6
votes
4answers
46k views

Correct usage of pronoun: “their” vs “its” [closed]

Which word goes in the blank (their or its)? The stones are small, but ___ value is great. I think it is their but my child's paper says it is its. Which is correct and why?
6
votes
2answers
3k views

Pronouns: a word class or a subclass of nouns?

In the recently published ‘Oxford Modern English Grammar’, Bas Aarts classifies pronouns with nouns and not as a separate word class. In this, he follows the authors of ‘The Cambridge Grammar of the ...
5
votes
0answers
505 views

When do I use “me” and when “I”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Should I put myself last? I get this mixed up so often. Should I say: Me and Rob are going swimming. or I and Rob are going swimming. I know the latter sounds ...
4
votes
3answers
3k views

Is using “she” when the gender is unknown ungrammatical? [duplicate]

I often come across the use of "she" not as an gender neutral pronoun as such but as the pronoun of choice when the gender is unknown. This is particularly common in scientific/technical documents but ...
4
votes
1answer
285 views

Why have some plural pronouns replaced singular pronouns?

While today we use for example the word "you" for second person singular and plural in objective and subjective manner, there were actually words to differentiate this usages like "thou" and "thee", ...
4
votes
2answers
7k views

Proper usage of 'which' in a sentence

I read the post Usage of "which", and am trying to frame my own sentence that uses "which". Consider the sentences below. In the first, I want to say that variable shadowing is the reason ...
4
votes
2answers
932 views

Why is the pronoun “I” written with an uppercase letter, even when it's not at the beginning of a sentence? [duplicate]

In the following sentence, the pronoun I is written capitalized, even if it is not at the beginning of a sentence. Why? What kind of questions can I ask here? should I capitalize all the ...
4
votes
1answer
10k views

“that which” used together

When I read essays from Eliot, I find him using "that which" frequently, e.g. the combination which is the murder of Agamemnon is probably as complex as that which is the voyage of Ulysses. A ...
3
votes
5answers
217 views

What do the pronouns indicate? [closed]

Whatever one believes about the merits of completing the remaining intercity portion of the system, it is clear that 1) it gives the country an intercity transportation network that would be sorely ...