A pronoun is a word that can function by itself as a noun phrase.

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171 views

Ambiguity in use of relative pronouns

The animal ate the father of Jay, who was an engineer. So who is the engineer here? Father or Jay? How can I use which, that, who to refer to the whole object or only to parts of the object?
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4answers
118 views

Should it be 'which affect' or 'who affect'? [closed]

I have this sentence Persons performing tasks which affect product quality should have appropriate skill and knowledge. in which I am not sure whether who or which is grammatically correct.
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3answers
294 views

The word “I” is singular, but it does not follow the subject-verb agreement for a singular subject

When you have a singular noun as subject, a singular verb follows. However, the pronouns "I" and "you" are singular but singular verbs do not follow after them. Does anyone know something about this ...
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1answer
596 views

Mix active and passive voice in the thesis

I am starting to write my thesis and was told not to use passive voice. But the active voice pronouns "I" and "we" do not sound right somehow and I even found this link How to Write... encouraging ...
2
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2answers
105 views

he/she or what else could fit in a sentence referring to a transgender

The transgender, who secured 75 per cent in B.A. through distance education programme, said she had applied for the examination soon after the publication of the notification. On reading the above ...
2
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2answers
95 views

Which pronoun shall I use in this context? [closed]

Humans ought to treat others as a human being would treat others. Never should they bully and abuse anyone. Since the ultimate goal of them is to let everyone become capable of living an ...
2
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1answer
32 views

Professor Bob's lab

I know "Bob's house" and "Bob's" mean the same thing. Question 1: Is there a name for this grammatical phenomenon? Can one call it an abbreviation? Question 2: In the context of within a ...
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0answers
55 views

Is this usage correct: “my [verb]” [duplicate]

I have been thinking of this sentence: All these factors culminated in my choosing [some life decision]. Is the usage of my choosing correct?
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3answers
692 views

Ourselves vs us?

I am simply haunted by the fear of my family not having enough money to support ourselves. I am simply haunted by the fear of my family not having enough money to support us. The ...
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1answer
81 views

Pronouns of “somebody”, “anybody”, etc

I am a little confused about the usage of pronouns. I often see people using "their" with words that seem to be singular, for example, "somebody" and "anybody", which looks weird to me. (I.e., one ...
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5answers
1k views

'Who' or 'which' in reference to companies [duplicate]

What is appropriate to use here, who or which? There are around 50 companies who/which deliver scanning services to private and business consumers.
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3answers
4k views

Why does “Please approve it” sound wrong?

Whenever I read an email like this, the English sounds incorrect to me. "I would like to take tomorrow off. Please approve it." I want to say that "Please approve" is more natural, but why is that?
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2answers
112 views

“I will rob you of it” vs. “I will rob it of you”

Which of these is grammatically correct, and why? I will rob you of it I will rob it of you
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4answers
347 views

What do you call someone who is above average?

Is there any word (noun?) for a person who is not bad at doing something, yet not too good?
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2answers
99 views

“Those exposed to extreme cold” vs. “those who are exposed to extreme cold”

I saw the following example sentence in a TOEFL preparation book: To prevent frostbite, those exposed to extreme cold are advised to wiggle their fingers and toes to increase blood circulation. ...
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1answer
124 views

Using a pronoun and a proper noun with a descriptor

With the sentence: "If he was Little Freddie, the apple of Vinnie's eye, would have told him." Does it mean if he was Little Freddie, or was he referring to Little Freddie? I think the meaning is for ...
2
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1answer
543 views

Between friend and acquaintance? [closed]

What do I call people in between friends and acquaintance? I want to refer to my classmates who I know somewhat well and are friendly with, but not friends.
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1answer
254 views

Can the antecedent ever be in a prepositional phrase?

It seems like a basic concept, but I want to make sure. Can the antecedent ever be in a prepositional phrase? For example: Jill likes running with Julie. She is a good person. Does she refer to ...
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3answers
261 views

“I like it that” vs. “I like that”

I want to express the following: You are blaming me for your lack of concern and I like that (in a sarcastic way). Which one of the following sentences would be correct? I like it that your ...
2
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2answers
925 views

“They are…” vs. “these are” when answering the question “What are these…?”

When asked, "What are these called in English?" or similar, should we use just the right pronoun or can we also answer with the right demonstrative pronoun? For example, which is grammatical or ...
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2answers
45 views

Why is “you cannot buy all what you like” wrong? [duplicate]

I got the following sentences from http://www.engvid.com/english-resource/50-common-grammar-mistakes-in-english-2/ Wrong: You cannot buy all what you like! Right: You cannot buy all that you ...
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2answers
462 views

Either + plural noun + plural verb

I know that "either" is singular as is "neither". But I've seen it used as a plural pronoun. Take this sentence for example: It's the only chance either of us have of getting home. Is this usage ...
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2answers
138 views

Which is correct: “for you who loves knowledge” or “for you who love knowledge”?

In this case, the "you" is singular. Further, does adding a comma after "you" make a difference? Thanks.
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1answer
170 views

Possessive pronouns in research papers [closed]

Contrast: In order to develop a relationship between the energy spectra and their corresponding Fourier transforms... with In order to develop a relationship between the energy spectra and ...
2
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1answer
73 views

What does the “either” in this sentence mean?

The whole paragraph is like this: An experiment has three possible outcomes, l, J, and K. The probabilities of the outcomes are 0.25, 0.35, and 0.40, respectively. If the experiment is to be ...
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2answers
834 views

Noun order: “He and we…” or “We and he…”? Similarly, “…him and us” or “…us and him”?

It's convention and polite to always list yourself last in a list. I say "John and I went to the store" and not "I and John went to the store." So does that mean that I should always list myself ...
2
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1answer
50 views

'Those that couldn't let go' [closed]

"Those that couldn't let go" is the title of a quest in an online MMPORG. Is this correct or should it be "Those whom..." or "They that ..."?
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2answers
189 views

Other/the other confusion in a sentence

Consider the following sentence (it is a real medical condition) These people have blue skin. We should let them get in touch with other sufferers. I would prefer using the other sufferers as ...
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1answer
200 views

Using “their” vs. “his” [duplicate]

Why do we use their instead of his in this sentence? another driver flashes their lights
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2answers
257 views

Others or the others in this example

The goal of ABC is to enable the doctors all around the world to share and benefit from the knowledge of (the) others. (meaning of other doctors all around the world) I know that THE OTHERS ...
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2answers
81 views

Case of Pronoun [duplicate]

I want to know _ you talked to. (who or whom) I want to know _ the culprit is. (who or whom)
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1answer
236 views

The significance of “y”

Regarding the pronoun "your", ignoring the singular possessive form. Is there some significance to the "prefix" y or is this a coincidence? Our: Collective possession, including me. Y our: ...
2
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2answers
192 views

Reflexive pronouns and understood “to be”

So, I've got a fairly straightforward sentence: Poe did not think himself a writer of inferior material. It is my understanding that "a writer of inferior material" is the object of the ...
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1answer
391 views

Usage of “other” with singular nouns

Reading an English textbook and learning stuff, they mention that that "other" is used only with plural or uncountable nouns. But what about this? There is no other way..no other option. Car ends ...
3
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1answer
134 views

Is 'somelike' a word?

Never mind the laconic title. It's incontrovertibly a word. What I'd like to know is whether the little bugger has ever been recorded by lexicographers. I've ruffled a dozen dictionaries to no avail, ...
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4answers
557 views

It is us? It is we? [duplicate]

Which would it be--it is us, or it is we? "Who is the real culprit? It is us, the ignorant, apathetic people of America." Or, "Who is the real culprit? It is we, the ignorant, apathetic people of ...
3
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3answers
228 views

Is “It must be him with whom you enjoy doing your assignments, not me” correct? [duplicate]

I’d like all of you to please consider the following sentence: It must be him with whom you enjoy doing your assignments, not me. I have known that after 'to be' verb pronouns words take the ...
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0answers
33 views

illiterate use of pronoun [duplicate]

I heard a movie character say, "I smell ME a rat." I know that the use of "me" is not standard English. What is the grammatical explanation for the insertion of "me" in that kind of sentence?
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4answers
78 views

Can a personal pronoun refer to a subject that is never explicitly mentioned?

I'm having trouble accepting as legitimate this sentence: "In her new book, Jane Doe's sister Sally struggles with poverty." (This was offered as correct in a tutoring guide to SAT Writing Section.) ...
3
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1answer
7k views

Is it correct to say “I myself”?

I thought it was incorrect to say I myself as in: I myself don’t like this idea. However, last night I was watching the second Harry Potter movie, and one of the characters said: In case you ...
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1answer
98 views

What does “the us’es” mean?

What is the meaning of us’es in this passage below? The only thing they have to look forward to is hope. And you have to give them hope. Hope for a better world, hope for a better tomorrow, hope ...
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0answers
42 views

Using “they” for single person [duplicate]

I have encountered some people using pronoun "they" when referring to a single person, such in this example: Even if the cyclist is 100% at fault (I don't think they are), leaving the scene of ...
0
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4answers
131 views

“Makes them difficult to simulate” vs “makes it difficult to simulate them”

Which statement is correct? The complexity of these systems makes them difficult to simulate on computers. The complexity of these systems makes it difficult to simulate them on computers. ...
0
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3answers
725 views

Using “it” multiple times in a sentence

From http://meta.stackexchange.com/questions/194744/change-wording-of-unclear-what-youre-asking The current description of "unclear what you're asking" misuses the pronoun "it" in the second ...
2
votes
1answer
440 views

Possessive pronouns vs possessive determiners

If my understanding is correct, the possessive personal pronouns (which are mine, thine, yours, his, hers, its, ours, and theirs) are used in place of nouns, whereas the possessive determiners (which ...
2
votes
1answer
77 views

Possessive pronoun drops in fiction [closed]

Assuming the reader knows who is being referred to, what do you think is the effect on the reader when possessive pronouns are dropped in fiction. For example: Brown hair is pulled back into a ...
3
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2answers
1k views

Why is there an 'it' in “I find it very difficult to do this”?

I find it strange that one has to use the pronoun it in sentences like I find it very difficult to do this. I would like to know the grammatical reason (if there is one) for this, if it has ...
1
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1answer
518 views

“Vendors and consultants, each of which” or “… each of whom”? [duplicate]

Which is correct: Sources of information include vendors and consultants, each of which usually has an interest in selling something. Sources of information include vendors and consultants, ...
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2answers
108 views

“Which professors…” or “Whom professors…”? [closed]

Which one is correct? Which professors do you recommend? Whom professors do you recommend?
3
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2answers
333 views

passive Vs active or omission of 'which is'

What is the part of speech of 'regarded' in the following? "a quality of beauty and intensity of emotion regarded as characteristic of poems" (NOAD) Why isn't it "... [which is] regarded ..."? ...