A pronoun is a word that can function by itself as a noun phrase.

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“Its” as a Possessive Pronoun

Since its can be both determiner possessive pronoun and nominal possessive pronoun, an example of its as determiner possessive pronoun would be: We saved this question for last because of its ...
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3answers
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“Neither” and “either” usage in negative sentence

I would like to make sure I understood the usage of these: Do you want A or B? I do not want either. [none of them] I want neither. [Can I say that?]
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546 views

May I please help who(m)ever is next [duplicate]

I am bringing up a rather pedantic point here, but, one that has me completely stumped. This is going to require some serious grammar knowledge. I was in a line at a shop today and the teenager at ...
18
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5answers
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Is the lowercase pronoun “i” a feature of Indian English?

The Rule The personal pronoun “I” is always capitalized in English, regardless of its position in a sentence. This is an orthographic convention that every native speaker should know. Whenever I ...
6
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5answers
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“He” / “she” vs. “it” regarding beloved objects

Is that normal to regard a beloved object (an animal, a car, a book) as he/she? If yes, what gender should be used in this case? One comment in this question touched the tendency to humanize things ...
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2answers
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Isn't who/whose only used for people?

Why is the usage of "whose" correct in this sentence: In the foothills of that large mountain range are the sources of a river whose course was not fully mapped until this century. I was under the ...
18
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1answer
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Ones or one's: Which is the correct usage?

I've been confused about this as long as I can remember. Should it be: One should do ones duty. or One should do one's duty. I'm guessing it should be the latter. But that doesn't sit well ...
11
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3answers
1k views

Where did the practice of using apostrophes for possessive nouns but not pronouns originate?

Where did the practice of using apostrophes for possessive nouns but not pronouns originate? For example, possessive nouns (both proper and common) are written with a apostrophe before the final s: ...
5
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3answers
7k views

“Who to follow” or “whom to follow”?

On twitter, there's a "who to follow" button on the upper side of the screen. Shouldn't it be "whom to follow"? This page suggests that whom is the correct usage in a case like this.
5
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5answers
391 views

The film [that/which] I selected for viewing

The film that I chose for the class to watch is called The Life of Igor. The film which I chose for the class to watch is called The Life of Igor. —At the margins, are both correct? (When I ...
5
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1answer
6k views

It is I who am at fault? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “It is they who lied” or “it is them who lied?” What rules make “Remember me, who am your friend” grammatical? Which one of these is correct? It is I who am at fault. ...
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5k views

“My another account” vs. “my other account”

A little debate going on here so I just want to know which one it is; I'm saying it's my other account since my another would be my one other account. The other person insists they both can be used; ...
4
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1answer
3k views

In non-spatial contexts, when should I use “this” versus “that”?

I'm always quite confused to choose which word should I put in the sentence like this/that :) That/This is not a problem at all. To be or not to be, this/that is the question. I know which one I ...
4
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2answers
15k views

Using 'her' vs. 'its' to refer to a country [duplicate]

I am currently reading Liddell Hart's "History of the Second World War", and I'm wondering why he sometimes uses her/she when talking about Japan. In my understanding of English, it should be its or ...
4
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1answer
557 views

Do we use “which” or “that” when referring to the preceding main clause as a whole?

Sorry, I don't think I can use all the grammatical terms right, so I'll illustrate: Peptide adsorption curves may cross [...] results in the inversion of peptide elution order. I've found a ...
3
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2answers
530 views

Is the formation “[s]he” overly distracting?

Does the use of "[s]he" as a gender-neutral pronoun prompt eye-rolling in the reader or is it generally accepted? I know it cannot be pronounced, but it seems to me a helpful contraction in written ...
2
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2answers
7k views

Is “none” singular or plural? How can I decide? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: None as plural indefinite pronoun With words that indicate portions—some, all, none, percent, fraction, part, majority, remainder, and so forth How can we cdecide the Verb ...
2
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2answers
1k views

A case of optional “that”: “check the” vs. “check that the”

Consider the following use case: Please check the username and password are correct. Please check that the username and password are correct. In this case, I would say that that is required ...
2
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1answer
1k views

Is “each” an adverb, pronoun, determiner, or what else? [duplicate]

What do Online Dictionaries Say? Cambridge Dictionaries Online says each is used as an adverb in the following examples: There are five leaflets – please take one of each. Each of the brothers ...
2
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1answer
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Using 'they' for person of unknown sex [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Gender neutral pronoun. In everyday use, I often use the pronoun "they" to refer to a unknown person if I do not know their sex. As in: Bob: Who was it that emailed you ...
2
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3answers
430 views

Adjective + “of them”

My wife and I were discussing whether it is allowable to put an adjective in front of "of them". For instance, I could say "I want 5 cats" and "I want 5 of them". However, while it sounds perfectly ...
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2answers
172 views

What the matter is vs. what is the matter used in the affirmative [duplicate]

I want to know what the matter is with her. I want to know what's the matter with her. I want to know what's her problem. Is "I want to know what's the matter with her" and 'what's the matter' ...
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2answers
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“Ask me anything” and “Ask anything to me”

There are some sentences I hear regularly: Ask me anything Ask anything to me. If you ask me whether he was right, I would tell you "No". If you ask me about whether he was right, .... ...
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2answers
80k views

“Anyone has” or “anyone have” seen them? [closed]

So I thought I'm sure about this and my instincts say that: "If anyone has seen them .." would be right but then again when I said it like: "If anyone have seen them .." I started thinking which one ...
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Whence the “it” in “I like it here”?

What is the origin of the use of the object (it) in the following sentences, and what is its purpose? I like it here! and Did you like it there? In essence, the things we are saying we ...
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Historical usage of “was”/“were” with “you”

I was reading letters from a surgeon to his wife during the Civil War and noticed he used "was" as opposed to "were" on many occasions. Examples: I truly wish you was here with me. Was you ...
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1answer
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Usage of “we” as plural second-person

I often hear people saying phrases of the type "How are we doing over here?" by servers at restaurants, for example. Obviously they mean "How are you (plural) doing?" Where does this type of usage ...
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4answers
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One - does common English usage equate that to “you” (2nd person) or “he/she” (3rd person)?

I am proof reading an academic paper on computer programming and am trying to ensure pronouns conform. This is an example sentence: Accordingly, one considers some entry fees in his strategic ...
3
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2answers
197 views

Using “with” without an object pronoun?

Growing up I had a friend whose family would constantly say "Are you going with?" or similar. It always annoyed me. Fast forward 20 years and now I have a coworker who does the same. "I'm going to ...
3
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3answers
353 views

Is the “us” in “all that will be left is us” correct usage?

In this sentence taken from the movie AI is 'us' the correct form of the pronoun? It certainly sounds better than if it were written with 'we' instead of 'us'. Also, I can sort of see why 'is' is ...
3
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1answer
99 views

Which one of this is the correct use of “one” as a pronoun?

a. When one reads the Hindi literature of the twentieth century, he finds a striking contrast between the writings of Munshi Premchand and later day writers of popular Hindi fiction. b. When one ...
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2answers
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Pants — “is it” or “are they”?

This question has come straight from this great question title: Pants — why is it plural? I just thought that if somebody hadn't already edited the title, it is either written right, or all editors ...
3
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1answer
427 views

The pronoun, it is popular…why?

I've noticed a shift towards a form of speech that I would love to know more about. It first showed-up in US TV dramas I think, but now it's common to hear it used in everyday conversation. Here are ...
3
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3answers
2k views

“I don't think that that can be done” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How do you handle “that that”? The double “that” problem Is there something wrong with this sentence? "I don't think that that can be done." ...
3
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2answers
347 views

How to ask a mixed-gender group for their participation?

This question deals with the use of y’all in written vs. spoken English, gender neutrality and group dynamics. I often find myself writing emails to a group of both men and women asking if they ...
3
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3answers
644 views

Is “It must be him with whom you enjoy doing your assignments, not me” correct? [duplicate]

I’d like all of you to please consider the following sentence: It must be him with whom you enjoy doing your assignments, not me. I have known that after 'to be' verb pronouns words take the ...
2
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3answers
1k views

Which pronoun refers to a group such as an orchestra — “they” or “it”?

Which pronoun should be used to refer to, say, an orchestra? Does it go on concert tours, or do they? Intuitively I’d go for “they”, but intuition is known to fail…
2
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2answers
1k views

Speaking about someone of unknown gender [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Gender neutral pronoun For example, user clicked the button. I don't know if the user is male or female, what gender should I use? Now I read a book, where the user is "she"...
2
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3answers
804 views

Referring to X (plural) units of Y as an “it”

I am reading The White Spider, a book on mountain climbing, and I got hung up on this passage which sounded wrong, although I can see why it isn't... Herman couldn't be expected to hear him in ...
2
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3answers
1k views

Is it grammatical to omit the subject from “I did my work”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is it acceptable to begin a declarative sentence with “Am”? Is it correct to start a sentence with did. Did my work. instead of I did my work. ...
2
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3answers
589 views

“as much as you and I” vs. “as much as you and me” [duplicate]

This was posted on facebook and people are saying it is incorrect, it should be: "...as you and I" Which is correct?
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4answers
495 views

Using “you” and “your” as a representation for yourself and everyone in general

Example sentence: "I love when your dog just lets you sit there to pet them. You don’t necessarily know if they are enjoying it, but they love you enough to just sit there with you for a bit." Is ...
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1answer
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My and Linda's or Mine and Linda's? [duplicate]

How do you use possessive pronouns in cases where there are multiple "owners" and "objects" in question? For example would it be: "I've included my and Linda's suggestions in the file" or "I've ...
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2answers
215 views

Usage of possessive pronouns in subordinate clause or main clause?

To my knowledge, personal pronouns and the noun they represent can be inter-swapped. So both these sentences are correct. (I may be wrong, I'm not sure.) "Unless she arrives here early, Susan will be ...
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2answers
3k views

Should I Use “These” Books or “Those” Books [duplicate]

On this site there are links to books that I read. I recommend these/those books. Below on this page there are links to books that I read. I recommend these/those books. Should I use these or ...
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“Thank you for coming” and “Thank you for your coming”

Consider "Thank you for coming" and "Thank you for your coming". Would the latter one be grammatical? Why? Is it possible to recognize latter "coming" as noun? Some say you need no pronoun because it ...
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2answers
4k views

Noun order: “He and we…” or “We and he…”? Similarly, “…him and us” or “…us and him”?

It's convention and polite to always list yourself last in a list. I say "John and I went to the store" and not "I and John went to the store." So does that mean that I should always list myself last,...
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3answers
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“I like it that” vs. “I like that”

I want to express the following: You are blaming me for your lack of concern and I like that (in a sarcastic way). Which one of the following sentences would be correct? I like it that your ...
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2answers
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Pronoun “you” can be omitted as subject in imperative form, what other pronouns can be omitted, when and why?

The pronoun you can be omited as a general rule, but sometimes I’ve seen sentences that should have used I or it as the subject but it was omitted.
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1answer
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“I”, “me” and “myself” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “My friends and I” vs. “My friends and me” vs. “Me and my friends” Can “myself” stand for both “me” and “I” in “my mother and I/me”? ...