A pronoun is a word that can function by itself as a noun phrase.

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noun-pronoun agreement

Like the planets, the stars are in motion, some of them at tremendous speeds, but they... Just based on the above, how can we tell which noun the pronoun they refers to: planets or stars? Is ...
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3answers
319 views

Why does a pronoun as the predicate of an indirect object (e.g. “I gave her it”) sound wrong?

Forgive me if I've used the wrong terms in the title, I did my best given my middle-school grammar lessons and Wikipedia. "I gave her the book" sounds just fine, but "I gave her it" sounds stilted ...
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3answers
207 views

You can't put a flower in an a**hole and call it a vase

I am not trying to be funny (other than the fact that the joke is, in and of itself, funny). I'm asking someone to parse this for me. Seems to me it should be something like, "You can't put a flower ...
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2answers
40 views

Is “whosoever” used correctly in the following sentence?

Is "whosoever" used correctly in the following sentence? Is this sentence correct as a whole? Whosoever monk or priest sees this, may s/he take it, I've offered. The context is: A man, in order ...
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2answers
391 views

Why is “them” and not “those” correct?

I have been preparing for the SAT, and this question has been confusing me a lot lately. Some scissors (A) are designed for left-handed use, although most (B) of them (C) sold in stores (D) are ...
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1answer
35 views

Can “another” be used as a subject? [closed]

For example, there are two groups of people, a group travels to a foreign country just to enjoy beautiful attractions or take part in interesting festivals, and another goes to a new place to ...
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2answers
79 views

What does this “it” refer to?

Furthermore, Gilbert’s vibrant description of Naples’s pizza makes it sound unique and delicious. Does the "it" in the sentence above refer to the description or the pizza? Would it be better ...
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0answers
21 views

“You are not worse than her” or “You are not worse than she”? [duplicate]

Which one is the proper english? "You are not worse than her" or "You are not worse than she"? And is it so striking to use one instead of the other?
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2answers
69 views

Is this sentence grammatically correct, use of pronouns

I was wondering if this sentence is grammatically correct: The veracity of mathematical facts transcends the limits of human knowledge, which only precludes our understanding of it. I wanted to ...
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1answer
54 views

Is it wrong to use “we” as fans for something our team accomplished (or failed)?

I and fellow fans: "We won! Yeah!!!!" Devil's advocate: "No, you didn't! The [TeamName] won!" What can be said about this?
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Should I prefer “my” or “our” when the object (a kid, a house) is “co-owned” by two people both present?

I was sitting on a couch between the wife and the husband of an old married couple (native English Londoners) and they were showing me pictures of their kids. They kept using phrases like here is ...
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2answers
112 views

“Each” in potential subject position in compound sentence always pronoun?

This question is related to: "Each" — pronoun or adverb The sentence in that question is: M and W are letters and each has 4 strokes In that sentence, how do we know that “each” is a ...
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What does “it” refer to in this John Locke text “…that Nature hath provided and left it in…”?

... the "labour" of his body and the "work" of his hands, we may say, are properly his. Whatsoever, then, he removes out of the state that Nature hath provided and left it in, he hath mixed his ...
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3answers
41 views

Verb inversion with possessive pronoun + interrogative

Is it yours? vs It is yours? Can #2 ever be appropriate? Does it exist to facilitate placing emphasis on the personal pronoun?
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1answer
42 views

Why is “it” wrong in this sentence?

From the SAT: When Doris Lessing published The Golden Notebook in 1962, it instantly established herself as one of the most important literary voices of her generation. It said that it is wrong. ...
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2answers
95 views

I vs Me from SAT question [duplicate]

Here is my example (from an SAT question): No one is sorrier than I that you missed the awards ceremony I don't know understand why it is "I". Shouldn't it be "me" since "I" is the subject here? ...
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1answer
45 views

Why is an interrogative pronoun not an adverb?

Consider these two sentences. A. Which museum did you visit? B. Which did you visit? In the first case the word "which" functions as an adjective modifying museum and in the second an interrogative ...
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3answers
68 views

Grammar: the function of “so” after conjunction?

Recently I read this sentence, and I am wondering, what is the function of "so" here? XYZ is the top provider of high-speed Internet services in the country, or so it claims in its ...
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Pronoun in English without specific referent

Writing academic essays in English can be a daunting task for the EFL writer (my native language is German), but for me a very specific problem gives me headaches and leaves me sitting with a smoking ...
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1answer
36 views

An alternative to gender specific pronouns [duplicate]

Is there any suitable alternative to using both gender specific pronouns in such cases? Example: Client uses his/her account.
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1answer
18 views

How should I capitalize “on which” using headline-style capitalization?

How should I capitalize on which in the headline The Construction of Those Terms on which the Parties Agree?
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3answers
329 views

Can a pronoun functioning as Object also be a Subject?

I want him to call me tomorrow. In this sentence we see: I, subject; want, verb; him, object. What is the subject of to call? Him? But him is the object of the verb want. Is this a correct ...
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3answers
254 views

How can a pronoun “one” be a noun?

I asked a question some days ago about if an atributive-only adjective can be followed by a pronoun one, for example in this sentence When the Olympics began in 779 B.C. There were not a lot of ...
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1answer
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'Someone' Singular or Plural? [duplicate]

As we know, when the pronoun someone is used, the succeeding verb will be conjugated in the 3rd-person singular. Thus, the following sentence demonstrates legal usage: I cannot enter the room; ...
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1answer
192 views

Can an attributive adjective come before pronouns?

For example, the attributive adjective only and pronoun one: can we say "there is only one"?
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1answer
27 views

The rule for the pronoun use after the comma

I am always confused whether I can leave the pronoun in or out after the comma. Michael, Anthony, Scarlet, and Bill combed half the parking lot, but (do I need a pronoun they) couldn’t find the ...
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3answers
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Should there be a subjective or objective pronoun here?

Reopen note This question has been linked to this question here: "Heard me [infinitive]" vs. "heard me [present participle]" However, that question is clearly about whether to ...
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3answers
186 views

The pronoun before the antecedent

Joe says it helps, as the cost of the drug falls to 10$. Is this correct usage in a headline of a newspaper article? I know in some cases, it's fine for the pronoun to come before the antecedent, ...
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8answers
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Pronoun question: referring to inanimate objects as 'he' or 'she'

I read the following claim concerning pronouns referring to inanimate objects: Anything that is meant to contain you, protect you or provide you with something beneficial is [often referred to ...
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1answer
71 views

'A or B' - singular or plural

An obvious communicator assumes that the listener is unaware of background information or related issues, and therefore provides them in the advertisement. Its goal will be to create a positive mood ...
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1answer
32 views

What is “the one” referring to?

I read the news report about the attacks happened in Beirut, Lebanon. Here is the link: Beirut, Also the Site of Deadly Attacks, Feels Forgotten. This sentence I don't understand. "But for some in ...
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2answers
153 views

When was “it” first used in weather sentences? [duplicate]

It is raining. It's a sunny day. I hate it when it rains. I'm prepared if it snows. It can be mighty cold at night! ... etc. My questions: When did English speakers start ...
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1answer
61 views

Can 'them' be used to indicate 'sentences'? [closed]

In your last message, you have said to ask you questions about your sentences, if I failed to understand these. In your last message, you have said to ask you questions about your sentences, if I ...
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1answer
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scope of 'everybody': infelicitous use of 'it'

Irene Heim claims the second 'it' is not felicitously used in this sequence of words. It must sound awkward. Everybody found a cat and kept it. It ran away. (source: (5) on page 225 of 'File Change ...
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1answer
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Using 'You' or 'I' in Forms

Which one of the following is better/more common/more widely accepted, when writing a form to be filled out as part of a survey? Option 1: Q1. My preferred investment option: ________ (list of ...
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Does the omission of pronoun in one of these two sentences could make the meanings of both vary greatly?

I am doing my English assignment right now, and I couldn't decide which one sounds better: But luckily for New York City, a brightly-painted retro bus from the 70s, facilitated with lavish ...
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3answers
50 views

Using pronouns before mention

Is it grammatically correct to say, for example, Providing that you'll return it tomorrow, you can use my computer. Notice that I've used "it" before actually naming the object. Can we use both ...
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1answer
33 views

Is the pronoun 'themselves' offset by commas like an appositive?

For example: would this sentence be correct? Termites, themselves, can't break down the cellulose either.
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132 views

What the matter is vs. what is the matter used in the affirmative [duplicate]

I want to know what the matter is with her. I want to know what's the matter with her. I want to know what's her problem. Is "I want to know what's the matter with her" and 'what's the matter' ...
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1answer
48 views

Relative Pronoun [closed]

Is the following sentence correct grammatically? This is the man, who I told you about, raised 6 million dollar to our company. If it's ungrammatical, what makes it so?
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Why don't we use the word “hims”?

Here is a question that may be ridiculous, but I was curious if there is an answer other than, "That's just how it is." A student of mine wants to know why he/him/his is not consistant with ...
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0answers
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“Closer in age to herself”: Hypercorrection? Grammatical?

Is the use of “myself” in the following sentence and example of hypercorrection, or is this acceptable use according to standard (i.e., prescriptivist) grammar? Her grandmother was crazy about ...
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9answers
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Why is 'Where's it' Grammatically incorrect? [duplicate]

I want to explain to the Spanish developers of a website why this text label sounds wrong: If your column isn't country data, where's it? IMHO, you have to say "Where is it?" - but I don't know ...
2
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2answers
78 views

Are 'third person singular pronouns' optional?

I took a English test in a non-English speaking country. There was a problem with a picture. In the picture, a girl whose name is Ann says, My knife doesn't cut well. The question asked: "What ...
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3answers
137 views

Do any style guides advocate the alternating use of “he” and “she” as a gender-neutral pronoun?

I don't like the options that are usually given in the "gender-neutral pronoun" debate. The singular they offends my prescriptivist sensibilities. His/her constructions are clunky and look terrible. ...
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2answers
90 views

By taking one step at a time or by taking “it” one step at a time?

The sentence was written in a conclusion and the topic is about simple ways to keep healthy. "By taking it one step at a time, you'll be on your way to a more fulfilling life in no time." Does it ...
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2answers
88 views

Problems with pronouns (ambiguity)

Mary likes John a lot, but Cindy doesn't. She(Cindy) doesn't allow him to talk to her(Cindy), because she(Cindy) thinks he is annoying. Although the pronouns in bold are intended to refer back to ...
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1answer
204 views

Sentence improvement [duplicate]

The given sentence is- 'As no one knows the truth as fully as him, no one but him can provide the testimony.' As far as the highlighted part is concerned, I improved it as- 'As no one knows the ...
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1answer
129 views

“In Partnership of/with the Embassy?”

Which way is correct? In Partnership of the Embassy of Spain... or In Partnership with the Embassy of Spain...
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Modifiers of pronouns

Someone new Anybody else Something good I've never thought about it, but why does the adjective follow the noun it modifies? Is there a technical term for this?