A pronoun is a word that can function by itself as a noun phrase.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

-1
votes
2answers
10k views

“Be them” or “be they”? [closed]

Which of the following is grammatical? He had lollies be they red or blue? He had lollies be them red or blue? It seems as if it could be them as an object of be.
13
votes
4answers
14k views

Using the expression “the same” for a previously mentioned item

I frequently use "the same" as in the following sentence. I need the details of XYZ project. Could you please send me the same as soon as possible? Is this grammatically correct? I have not been ...
2
votes
2answers
526 views

Unnecessary pronouns: “The President he issued…”

Is it now considered acceptable to follow a proper noun with a pronoun? E.g. The President he issued a new executive order.
16
votes
1answer
24k views

Which is correct: “you and I” or “you and me”?

I was told the correct usage is for example: "My wife and me" but I hear often "I and my wife" or "my wife and I". Google gives 34M results for "My wife and I" and 909K results for "My wife and me" ...
14
votes
4answers
173k views

“With who” vs. “with whom”

Is this correct? The person with whom I'm doing the project should be here soon. If it is, is with always a dative preposition (like mit in German)?
11
votes
2answers
9k views

Is “Me neither” incorrect?

I've heard that "me neither" is incorrect. Instead one should say "neither do I." People definitely say "me neither" conversationally, but is it technically incorrect?
11
votes
4answers
1k views

Is there a name for the practice of dropping pronouns in written speech?

I’m specifically thinking about emails I receive all day where someone will write: Haven’t seen it yet. Will respond when received. If it were spoken, we would certainly hear: I haven’t ...
4
votes
2answers
8k views

Is “either you or [third-person]” followed by a singular verb or a plural verb?

Or, put in examples: which of the following is grammatically correct? Either you or your sister is going to have to do the chores. Either you or your sister are going to have to do the ...
10
votes
4answers
7k views

“That was me” vs. “That was I” [duplicate]

When telling a story about myself from the past, I have found myself in an internal debate over whether the correct way to segue into the present is: That was me twelve years ago. Or: That ...
9
votes
5answers
7k views

Is it appropriate to refer to a person of unknown sex by “it”?

I would like to treat a user as a non-gender noun and refer to it with the gender-neutral pronoun, it. E.g., The user defines two variables, x and y. It then multiplies each variable by a prime ...
3
votes
3answers
2k views

Can “his/her” be replaced by “his”?

Yesterday, I asked this question on Web Apps: If a Facebook user dies, what happens to the account? Actually, I wanted to ask it this way: If a Facebook user dies, what happens to his/...
15
votes
6answers
3k views

Using both “one’s” and “their” to refer to the same entity

Consider this example: Sustainability management in large organisations is an important activity that helps to achieve one’s business goals while at the same time reducing their environmental ...
9
votes
4answers
9k views

Gender neutral reflexive pronoun — equivalent to “himself” and “herself”

How would you refer to a gender neutral subject with a reflexive pronoun? It is unbelievable how a perpetrator will cast oneself in the role of victim. That does not seem right. Is there a ...
7
votes
2answers
189 views

How did the practice of identifying an object after using a pronoun evolve?

While watching Barclay's Premier League matches on the Fox Soccer Channel, the announcers often identify an object by name immediately after using a pronoun. For example, in a match occuring right ...
6
votes
6answers
8k views

‘With me being one of them’—grammatically correct?

Would the phrase 'With me being one of them' be grammatically correct? Sounds a bit odd in my head and I triple-checked mentally but couldn't tell if it was correct or not. 'With I being one of them' ...
5
votes
4answers
5k views

What is the correct relative pronoun for “government”?

What is the correct relative pronoun for "government"? Which of the following phrases is correct? I am writing for an American [English] audience. The Queensland Government, who licenses several ...
5
votes
2answers
5k views

Is naming the first person last proper grammar or just proper manners? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “My friends and I” vs. “My friends and me” vs. “Me and my friends” I cringe when someone does not follow the rule of naming the first person last: Who went to the ...
5
votes
4answers
1k views

“We're all each other has”

I heard this phrase We're all each other has. in Family Guy and a quick googling shows about a hundred thousand occurrences. It sounds really strange to me. I would say We are all we have. ...
3
votes
2answers
3k views

“The ones” or “those”?

I recently corrected "ghettos, such as the ones found..." to "ghettos, such as those found..." Was I correct or are both versions right?
2
votes
2answers
8k views

“Myself” vs. “by myself”

I get confused with the following. Any explanation would be greatly appreciated. I can't do it myself. I can't do it by myself.
1
vote
5answers
47k views

“my”, “of me”, “of mine” - when to use these possessive constructions

I have been encountering possessive constructions with the preposition "of" and a possessive form of pronoun frequently, but I do not fully understand what it means and when to use it. In particular, "...
11
votes
4answers
36k views

Should I use “his/her” or “its”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicates: Gender neutral pronoun Is it correct to use “their” instead of “his or her”? I am writing software documentation. I have this issue: I am talking ...
10
votes
4answers
13k views

Is it correct to use “me too” and “I too”?

I'm a bit confused. Is it correct to use "me too" and "I too"? (Also with other pronouns.) For example, if I want to say that Juan gives a present to Ana and I give a present to Ana: Juan gives a ...
15
votes
6answers
3k views

Is “so” a pronoun?

Reminded by What is the grammatical function of so in this sentence, something that has always bothered me is that the word "so" can be used as a pronoun: It looks like rain Responding with: ...
12
votes
3answers
1k views

“Can I help who's next?”

This seems to happen every time I go to my local bagel shop. Everyone is waiting in a line, and when the cashier is ready to help the next person, he/she asks, "Can I help who's next?" or "May I help ...
11
votes
5answers
92k views

When to use “me” or “myself”?

Which one is correct: Someone like me... or Someone like myself... Is "like myself" ever correct?
13
votes
1answer
2k views

Origins of possessive pronouns

If apostrophe + s is the acceptable way of denoting a genitive in English, is it possible that possessive pronouns, such as hers, ours and yours, started life as possessive adjectives with apostrophe +...
7
votes
5answers
10k views

Is it incorrect to say, 'Give me it'?

Is it incorrect to say, 'Give me it' ? I am told that it is and one should always say, 'Give it me'?
9
votes
3answers
11k views

“All our X” vs. “all of our X”

Is the word "of" optional in this instance? Is either of these considered preferable to the other? Taste all our delicious treats. Taste all of our delicious treats.
5
votes
4answers
17k views

“Me being” versus “my being” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Gerund preceded by possessive pronoun (e.g. “He resents your being more popular than he is”) Until a few months ago, I had always thought that sentences like ...
23
votes
5answers
3k views

Is “iff” considered a real word or just an abbreviation?

I wonder if "iff" is considered a real word (as LEO says) or is it just an abbreviation (as in Wiktionary)?
8
votes
5answers
7k views

“Till death do us part”

Every time I see this expression, I can't help thinking it's grammatically wrong. Is it grammatically acceptable? Why is it used extensively in this form?
7
votes
3answers
4k views

Why haven't we used “it” instead of “he or she”?

There is a related discussion on this forum. My questions is different. I'm all for gender awareness, but why hasn't a properly defined pronoun "it" been used instead of "he/she" or "he or she", etc. ...
6
votes
7answers
7k views

Is [Its'] a word? (Note the apostrophe at the end.)

I just had a strange flashback to a conversation I had when I was in high school, with a man who was regarded by many members of a particular online community as having an impressive degree of ...
4
votes
2answers
947 views

“It is having time to think that makes me depressed” — grammatical function of “that”?

It is having time to think that makes me depressed. In this sentence, what is the grammatical function of the word that?
2
votes
3answers
588 views

Use of they as singular [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is it correct to use “their” instead of “his or her”? I, and many people I have heard, occasionally use 'they' and 'their' in the singular when ...
6
votes
3answers
1k views

“Nobody will help you but me” vs. “Nobody will help you but I”

As has been shown in another question, in comparisons with than both the accusative and the nominative are possible and grammatical: He loves you more than I. He loves you more than me. ...
4
votes
0answers
398 views

What is the possessive form of “what”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: 'Which', 'whose' or something else? First of all, I'm not a native speaker so I can't rely on my intuition in this specific case. For a very long time I ...
4
votes
1answer
2k views

Context to distinguish “we” inclusive versus exclusive [closed]

In English, "we" has no clusivity - context is needed to determine whether it means we-including-you or we-excluding-you. What context can a speaker provide to disambiguate without sounding awkward? ...
3
votes
4answers
1k views

“Which” or “what”

Much of (what/which) scientists know about dinosaurs has been recently discovered. The phenomenon of (what/which) are known as corporate networks has also attracted attention. And yes, the ...
2
votes
3answers
1k views

Can the feminine pronouns be gender-neutral? [closed]

I know this sounds weird but I've been noticing a lot of texts on the Internet like this one: "Any citizen is concerned with her well-being ...". The word in question is "her". To me it seems like in ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

Usage of “whose” not referring to a person [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Referring to some attribute of an inanimate object — use “who's”? I noticed the use of "whose" in the following sentence I wrote does not refer to a person: ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Do “that” and “it” refer to different things in this sentence?

He likes going to the library to study. That always makes her happy. What if the last sentence were to be changed to It always makes her happy. Do these two sentences mean something ...
1
vote
0answers
185 views

Possessive “that's” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: 'Which', 'whose' or something else? Is the use of "that's" correct in the sentence below? Imagine a frame with two sets of strings stretched across, ...
0
votes
4answers
11k views

Use of “it” and “its” for people and animals

Can I use it and its for people? Example: The fear is the essential attribute of a human nature. It figures a crucial role in its survival. where its means human's. Can I use it and its for ...
21
votes
7answers
87k views

What does “thy” mean?

I read a sentence containing the word thy, but I cannot find the meaning of that word. Is it older English, or is it still used in contemporary English today?
7
votes
5answers
7k views

Use of “myself” in business-speak

Occasionally, I will hear or read coworkers using "myself" in place of "me," as in: If you have any questions, you can contact Gimli or myself. I have sent the list to Legolas, Glorfindel, ...
6
votes
5answers
3k views

Why is “herself” required in this particular sentence?

Why is a reflexive pronoun, i.e. herself, grammatically required in the following sentence? I gave Susie a picture of herself. Compare with: I gave Susie a picture of her. This ...
17
votes
4answers
40k views

“Its” as a Possessive Pronoun

Since its can be both determiner possessive pronoun and nominal possessive pronoun, an example of its as determiner possessive pronoun would be: We saved this question for last because of its ...
6
votes
2answers
520 views

May I please help who(m)ever is next [duplicate]

I am bringing up a rather pedantic point here, but, one that has me completely stumped. This is going to require some serious grammar knowledge. I was in a line at a shop today and the teenager at ...