A pronoun is a word that can function by itself as a noun phrase.

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Confused about proper nouns like Dad and Mom [duplicate]

Im confused because well people say that sometimes you use a capital letter in mom and dad. So when do you use capital letters for mom and dad?
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0answers
29 views

Can the pronoun “one” precede the thing it is referring to in a sentence?

I give an example so you understand right away what I'm asking. Does the following sentence sound right: Users are parts of not only the one being discussed right now, but the already-mentioned two ...
2
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3answers
33 views

Sentence: use of is/are with you yourself

Can't seem to figure this one out: Of course, it is more difficult to analyze those signs if you yourself is/are stressed beyond belief. Both seem to sound wrong (or maybe I'm overworking). ...
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2answers
49 views

Avoiding reflexive pronouns

Say, for some reason, it's preferable to avoid pronouns when referring to someone. With most forms of pronouns, it's easy to do so by substituting their name in. Consider: She likes the bread of her ...
2
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1answer
98 views

Is “each” an adverb, pronoun, determiner, or what else?

What do Online Dictionaries Say? Cambridge Dictionaries Online says each is used as an adverb in the following examples: There are five leaflets – please take one of each. Each of the brothers ...
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1answer
68 views

What types of words/phrases are “this” “here” & “they”?

I'm currently doing an analytic essay on my drama coursework (fun.). I'd like to explain how the playwright never reveals the exact setting of the act, by using only phrases such as "this","here", and ...
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3answers
43 views

How to determine the right meaning of 'no not I' ? (1762, UK)

Source: The original Miller of Dee from Bickerstaffe's "Love in a village" (1762) There dwelt a miller, hale and bold, beside the river Dee; He danced and sang from morn till night, no lark so ...
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2answers
56 views

Why should a copula link two noun phrases of the same case?

http://english.stackexchange.com/a/30392/50720 motivated this question: To quote from the clear explanation: The rule for what [Fowler] and others consider technically right is ... that ...
5
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3answers
704 views

Why “themselves” instead of “himself” when referring to third-person singular? [duplicate]

I've read today a comment from a UK user that sounded weird to me: so the OP is shooting themselves in the foot here with the tone then. I would have said instead: so the OP is shooting ...
9
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2answers
3k views

How should I avoid this reflexive pronoun, or is it okay?

I typed a sentence in Microsoft Word as: o Each mobile operating system implements encryption in their own way. It was part of a list of bullet points. I got dinged for their own being ...
0
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2answers
31 views

What is the correct pronoun?

What is the correct pronoun for this sentence "Erica went to get them from the bakery" or is it already correct?
0
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1answer
28 views

“His” or “My” when describing who I am [closed]

I am wondering which of the below sentence is correct... (if there are other errors, please point them out as well) It is because of these experiences that make me who I am today, a leader who ...
2
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1answer
58 views

What is the correct pronoun agreement?

Last one I promise but i need someone to double check me please... What is wrong with this pronoun agreement "Whichever of the six players hit the most home runs, they win the contest" or is it ...
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1answer
25 views

What is the correct pronoun for this?

What is the correct pronoun for this sentence "Each car handles differently, depending on how it is pressed" or is it already correct?
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1answer
86 views

Cohesive devices

Hi I'm analysing an old advertisement at the moment. Below's a picture of it, I'm stumped on one thing. Can someone tell me if the pronouns 'you' and 'your' are anaphoric references or exophoric ...
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3answers
132 views

Is the sentence given below an example of syntactic ambiguity?

The shelf can support a heavier load compared to the others. Would this sentence be considered ambiguous? To me, the pronoun others could refer to either other shelves or other loads, but I wanted to ...
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1answer
32 views

Pronoun usage: that vs one

I've encountered a sentence on English Wiktionary: The company's 2005 revenue exceeds that of 2004 Can I use one instead of that in the sentence? And that one? And, basically, what is the ...
5
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2answers
1k views

What are the most popular gender-neutral pronouns that aren't the same as other contemporary pronouns?

There have been attempts to use other contemporary English pronouns to stand-in as a true gender-neutral pronoun, given that English is lacking a commonly-accepted one for adult humans (non-humans and ...
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2answers
88 views

“Alex and I” vs. “me and Alex” [duplicate]

Is it improper to say "me and Person X"? I always hear it said as "Person X and I", but have personally learned to say "me and Person X". Is there a difference between the two versions and is one of ...
0
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1answer
49 views

subject-verb agreement for singular they [duplicate]

The singular-they is becoming trendy*, and I'm curious about conjugating the verbs for this pronoun. For example, instead of "Jim is over there," is it correct to say "They are over there," or "They ...
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1answer
38 views

'It' referring to a totality of more than just one entity

"My father loved to paint. He was a very accomplished amateur painter. Oils-he painted pictures of abandoned mills, and of barns, and of people and sailboats and lighthouses. All of it was ...
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1answer
29 views

What a pronoun should one use: “you” or “yours”? [duplicate]

This document sets out the rights and responsibilities of [you || yours], the Company, and the concerned third parties. If "the Client's rights" can be rephrased to "the rights of Client", then, ...
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0answers
99 views

Substituting 'many a …' with a pronoun

Consider the sentence: Many a rose bloomed in the garden. If you had to substitute "many a rose" with a pronoun, what would it be? "Many a ..." takes a singular verb. Does that mean it can be ...
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4answers
473 views

Can we use two pronouns side by side?

While writing an essay, I felt the need to write two "her"s simultaneously: Jane had taken the book from Ann five months ago, and hence felt the need to return her her book as soon as possible. ...
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0answers
23 views

Demonstrative Pronouns: This/That – Advanced Usage [duplicate]

When you learn about demonstrative pronouns, it seems like a really simple concept. This/these for nearby (physically, or with regards to time), that/those for distant things. Anywhere you go, online ...
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9answers
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How do you handle “that that”? The double “that” problem

Have you ever had a case where you felt compelled to include strange things like a double that in a sentence? If so, then what did you do to resolve this? For me, I never knew whether it was ...
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2answers
77 views

How do you refer to a 'they' character in a poem in a possessive sense?

I am writing a paper about Emily Dickinson's ‘They shut me up in Prose –.’ The two characters of the poem are the speaker and an unidentified group only referred to as 'they' and later as 'themself.' ...
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4answers
78 views

Pronoun for meat: it or some?

I feel the following sentence does not sound usual: I like meat. Can I eat it tonight? I think it is more common to say: I like meat. Can I eat some tonight? Is my understanding correct? ...
0
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1answer
163 views

“Your valentine” vs “my valentine”

I am going to send a gift to a far away lady I care a great deal about.I want to write her a card just to tell her I will always be there for her when she needs me, so to speak (not in any sexual ...
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3answers
70 views

Let's you and I / me be fair with each other

"Let's you and I / me be fair with each other." "Let you and I / me indulge in a little bit of reverie." Is "I" or "me" correct in those sentences? And why?
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1answer
132 views

“None of who’s” vs. “none of whose” [closed]

Is the following phrase grammatical? I seem to recall three people, none of who's names I can remember.
7
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4answers
8k views

Is it correct to use “me too” and “I too”?

I'm a bit confused. Is it correct to use "me too" and "I too"? (Also with other pronouns.) For example, if I want to say that Juan gives a present to Ana and I give a present to Ana: Juan gives a ...
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Gender neutral reflexive pronoun — equivalent to “himself” and “herself”

How would you refer to a gender neutral subject with a reflexive pronoun? It is unbelievable how a perpetrator will cast oneself in the role of victim. That does not seem right. Is there a ...
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1answer
35 views

Should even a large number be spelled out when used as a pronoun?

I have learned somewhere (or maybe decided ) that any number used as a pronoun -- that is, X standing alone to represent the already stated group of X nouns -- should be spelled out, no matter how big ...
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5answers
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Is using “he” for a gender-neutral third-person correct?

I know there are different opinions on this issue. My question: Is using "he" for a general, gender-neutral third person still in common use for formal writing? By common use I mean, can I expect my ...
18
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5answers
4k views

Why do we use the object instead of the subject pronoun in constructions like “stupid me”?

I'm trying to find out how come we say lucky me and stupid us rather than lucky I and stupid we. My understanding is that this is not a recent invention, but a relic from the distant past where it was ...
2
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1answer
45 views

fare thee well - grammar

Why is this sentence using 'thee' (which is, afaik the oblique case) and not 'thou'? The second person singular -in this case- should be the subject, i thought. The subject is the one doing the ...
3
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6answers
476 views

“Was it a girl?” or “Was that a girl?”

Here's a conversation. "I saw a salesperson there" "Was it a girl?" Is it OK to use "it" when you refer to the salesperson? Or should you use "that" instead of "it"?
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2answers
78 views

Nouns and pronouns [closed]

When I am writing about the United States and refer to "the states", do I say: "states began using their police powers" or "states began using its police powers"?
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Why did the KJV use “thou” toward God?

The word "thou" (and similar variations of the Latin tu in other languages) was used between people for informal speech, and talking to people of lower standing. So why did people use it (most ...
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who that someone is

"So next time a well-meaning friend offers to ‘speak to someone’, find out who that someone is." - This is from the next to the last paragraph on this site (which is written by New Zealanders, ...
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2answers
74 views

Why are indefinite singular third person pronouns treated as plurals? [duplicate]

It's always bugged me. My research behind this question was rather shallow, so I apologize if it's a duplicates. Thanks! Edit, example: Say you don't know who you are talking to on Reddit, you simply ...
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4answers
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Is “everyone” singular or plural?

Which is correct? Everyone were convinced that he would go to the game. Everyone was convinced that he would go to the game. I think it's "was", because "everyone" is singular, but I just ...
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6answers
4k views

“None” as plural indefinite pronoun

In my grammar book (English Grammar, HarperCollins Publishers), I read that none is occasionally treated as plural, but it is usually regarded as singular. Can you give me an example of sentence where ...
6
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2answers
661 views

“Nobody will help you but me” vs. “Nobody will help you but I”

As has been shown in another question, in comparisons with than both the accusative and the nominative are possible and grammatical: He loves you more than I. He loves you more than me. ...
15
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4answers
25k views

“Its” as a Possessive Pronoun

Since its can be both determiner possessive pronoun and nominal possessive pronoun, an example of its as determiner possessive pronoun would be: We saved this question for last because of its ...
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5answers
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Why is “herself” required in this particular sentence?

Why is a reflexive pronoun, i.e. herself, grammatically required in the following sentence? I gave Susie a picture of herself. Compare with: I gave Susie a picture of her. This ...
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10k views

“And you?” or “And yourself?” as response to “How are you?”

If someone asks "How are you?", which of the following is grammatically correct? "I am well, thank you. And you?" or "I am well thank you. And yourself?" 'Yourself' sounds more formal, and is used ...
9
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591 views

*all of us's friend

There's this funny gap I tried to write a paper once upon a time when I studied linguistics, and I'd like to know if anyone has insight into it. The construction in question is the possessive ...
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Which personal pronouns take dependent clause and which personal pronouns don't take

Note from The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language - (Page no. 507) i. It is I [who am at fault]. ii. It is me [who is at fault]. Example [i] follows the general rules for ...