A pronoun is a word that can function by itself as a noun phrase.

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There is no point in “my lying to you” or “me lying to you” - which is correct? [on hold]

More examples: 1) "there is nothing queer about your giving him that present" vs "there is nothing queer about you giving him that present". 2) "it's about you being an idiot" vs "it's about your ...
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Is there a name for the practice of dropping pronouns in written speech?

I’m specifically thinking about emails I receive all day where someone will write: Haven’t seen it yet. Will respond when received. If it were spoken, we would certainly hear: I haven’t ...
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31 views

What reflexive pronoun should I use if don't know the gender?

I am writing something for university and I am talking about how a patient might hurt... himself/herself? itself? (talking about the patient) If it was something informal I would use themselves but ...
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How should I avoid this reflexive pronoun, or is it okay?

I typed a sentence in Microsoft Word as: o Each mobile operating system implements encryption in their own way. It was part of a list of bullet points. I got dinged for their own being ...
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30 views

What is the meaning of “the party against whom enforcement is sought ” [on hold]

I am An English language learner,I don't understand this sentence of "the party against whom enforcement is sought ".
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3answers
117 views

Is “My dog can run much faster than I” correct? [duplicate]

I have been revisiting English grammar lessons for a test & I'm reading Pronouns. During a self test I came across this sentence "My dog can run much faster than ___". I selected "me" & ...
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26 views

“It wasn't me …” or “It wasn't I …”? [duplicate]

Which of the following usage is correct, grammatically? a) It wasn't I who did this project. b) It wasn't me who did this project.
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52 views

Learn the guitar vs. learn guitar

I'm having a debate with a friend who teaches music. In English we say learn music or learn programming but when it comes to guitar, I feel tempted to say learn the guitar instead of learn guitar. Is ...
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74 views

Is it acceptable to start an emphatic sentence with “It is he who…”?

It is he who the students choose as the repersentative of their class. Is this sentence grammatically correct? If not, why? I would like to know whether the pronoun ‘he’ can be used in this grammar ...
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57 views

Why isn't the objective case of the pronoun used in the given sentence? [duplicate]

"It is not we who are stupid," answered the camel-men, "but you." I would say that sentence should be "It is not us who are stupid", because it is usual practice to use objective case after verbs ...
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1answer
21 views

Where vs when - a matter of place or one of… time

Educated by weaklings, idolators of stigmata, especially fragmentary ones, we belong to a clinical age when only cases count. This is a quote from E.M. Cioran's book ''All Gall Is Divided'' (...
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Very confused!, what is the difference between “Impersonal Pronoun” & “Indefinite Pronoun”?

Oxford Dictionary say, Indefinite Pronoun: a pronoun that does not refer to any person or thing in particular, for example ‘anything’ and ‘everyone’ Source Impersonal Pronoun: a pronoun (in ...
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46 views

'None' and 'No one' [closed]

Do we use a plural verb with 'none' and a singular verb with 'no one'? We may say: None but the brave deserve accolades. But when we use 'no one', it is grammatically correct to say that 'No one ...
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1answer
47 views

Do intensive pronouns ever convey new information? [duplicate]

So for instance, the sentence 'I myself am called James' is not different to 'I am called James', information wise. As a comparative measure, take the sentences, which make use of reflexive pronouns '...
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25 views

What type of pronoun shoould I use before a gerund? [duplicate]

While reviewing grammar, I came upon this sentence: "I was able to inspect the apartment without his noticing the movement of my eyes." However, this phrasing seems awkward, especially the "his". I ...
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197 views

What is the correct grammar: “we” or “us”

What is the correct grammar for this sentence fragment: She needed we the taxpayers to pay.... She needed us the taxpayers to pay.... because without "the taxpayers", the correct sentence ...
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1answer
44 views

In poetry, what can I use to refer to someone without gender?

I am translating a poem from Korean. The poet is deliberately avoiding a gender reference (or, deeming it unnecessary) by using a neutral impersonal pronoun. In Korean there are generally few inbuilt ...
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1answer
55 views

Me, myself or I in non-I clause

MS Word is underlining the word myself and I am now wondering if I should be using me instead, seeing as the subject is not I. Which one is correct? Are both possible? At this point, putting as ...
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31 views

Non-moderate words

What is a non-moderate word and are there grammar rules for the treatment of such words? For example, are italics never used for emphasis with "everything," which I've been told is an example of a non-...
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2answers
150 views

What (or who) is the rival gang of the Jets?

Is a gang (or a musical group) considered like a person or an object? I.e. should I ask: Who is the rival gang of the Jets? Or should it be: What is the rival gang of the Jets? What is ...
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1answer
20k views

Correct usage of “of which”

I have two books, of which one is borrowed. Is this correct? Is there such a phrase?
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17 views

Should I use an objective pronoun or reflexive pronoun here?

In the sentence, "It reminds me of_." Does one use an objective pronoun, "It reminds me of me." Or a reflexive pronoun, "It reminds me of myself." I would think you would use an objective pronoun ...
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Is it incorrect to say, 'Give me it'?

Is it incorrect to say, 'Give me it' ? I am told that it is and one should always say, 'Give it me'?
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1answer
147 views

Microsoft word and confusion about himself/he/him

I am writing a small essay and I am confused about how to how to properly express this particular sentence below: Chapter 11 begins with the saint chastising the king who was thinking himself to be ...
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2answers
642 views

Which is correct: “for you who loves knowledge” or “for you who love knowledge”?

In this case, the "you" is singular. Further, does adding a comma after "you" make a difference? Thanks.
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3answers
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Should a company be referred to as “he/she” or as “it”?

When a customer represents a company, not a person, and a pronoun is needed to refer back to that customer, should one use he/she, or should one use it?
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58 views

Usage : Am yet to read those

Conversation : A- I am reading the Harry potter series. B- I am yet to read those. or is it better to use "I am yet to read them" or is there a better alternative?
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What was the purpose of the ethical dative?

I can find examples of its use, but not a rationale. Presumably there was one at some point. What was it for?
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Difference between Thee and thou?

What is the difference between thee and thou and how are they used?
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1answer
112 views

Pronouns when addressing a crowd

So recently, I have been working on a speech. Parts of this speech is a series of questions that I pose to the audience. I realize some difficulty when writing them. For example: “Who remembers ...
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2answers
82 views

The deal between “Mary and me” vs. “Mary and I” [closed]

I think "Mary and me," even though it sounds odd to the ear, is correct, but my choice is between: "I've forgotten everything about the deal between Mary and me" and "I've forgotten everything about ...
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5answers
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Why does a pronoun as the predicate of an indirect object (e.g. “I gave her it”) sound wrong?

Forgive me if I've used the wrong terms in the title, I did my best given my middle-school grammar lessons and Wikipedia. "I gave her the book" sounds just fine, but "I gave her it" sounds stilted ...
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1answer
22 views

to whom/which, for which

consider the sentence: Sometimes even if we try hard to come up with an idea, the result of "which" carried out is in vain. should it be which or it? Also, how to be able to make sentences with the ...
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Reason for the current trend to use «she» as the gender-neutral pronoun?

There are some questions on gender-neutral pronouns both here and on Writers. User Christine Letts writes: In academia, there is currently a movement toward using the feminine pronoun at all ...
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42 views

Can pronouns refer to adjectives?

If the following sentence is grammatical, does the pronoun it refer to deceptive? "Marcos was deceptive and it led to his demise." If the above sentence is wrong, then why is the following sentence ...
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27 views

Subject/object of sentence

Am I right in thinking this sentence in today's Irish Times is wrong: "A long-serving employee dismissed by Dunnes Stores after it won an appeal against an award of €67,500 damages to her has been ...
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3answers
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Why “themselves” instead of “himself” when referring to third-person singular? [duplicate]

I've read today a comment from a UK user that sounded weird to me: so the OP is shooting themselves in the foot here with the tone then. I would have said instead: so the OP is shooting ...
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1answer
25 views

surpass he or his, possessive or pronoun

Mary and John were given the same task. In the end, Mary's work is better, and far exceeds his/him. Is "him" grammatically incorrect here?
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23 views

Possesive pronoun to use with the interrogative pronoun [duplicate]

When using the interrogative pronoun, 'who', what would the possessive form be? 'Who checks X letterbox every day?'. I feel it ought to be 'his' but some people I know claim it should be 'their', ...
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4answers
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Why use “his” in association with the word “mankind”?

The economist Keynes in a book wrote: The power to become habituated to his surroundings is a marked characteristic of mankind. I would have used "its" instead but since English is not my ...
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Is it appropriate not to capitalize “I” if i personally view it as vanity on cultural grounds? [closed]

My native language is Russian, and the first person singular pronoun in Russian is "я". No capitalization. We also have a proverb in our language (and culture), which is literally translated as: "'я' ...
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Pronoun “you” can be omitted as subject in imperative form, what other pronouns can be omitted, when and why?

The pronoun you can be omited as a general rule, but sometimes I’ve seen sentences that should have used I or it as the subject but it was omitted.
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Should this sentence use the word “one” or “you”?

Is the sentence One only has to look at the size of Claire’s house to know that you can make a lot of money as a doctor. correct? I'm not sure whether mixing the words "one" and "you" in the ...
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20 views

enough for me to [closed]

1) I am thinking about the time when I had enough hair to comb. 2) I am thinking about the time when I had enough hair to comb it. 3) I am thinking about the time when I had enough hair for me to ...
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1answer
21 views

pronoun usage with a preceeding a

What pronouns would you use in the following sentence John and Lou recognized a bear cub. Replacing the proper nouns with a pronoun and then replace bear cub with a pronoun.
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37 views

Can relative pronouns reference each other?

Is it grammatically possible to say something like this?: He was who who he was. It sounds wrong and it surely doesn't make sense, but could it technically work? Thanks
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6answers
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Can an independent clause have an implied (or null) subject?

I'm trying to determine whether a clause with an implied subject can be considered independent - specifically in the case of compound sentences. For example: "I was tired, but went to the party ...
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2answers
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How is unjustifiable (falsely attributed) usage of *we* or *us* called? [closed]

I wonder what the name of phenomenon when a speaker uses we or us to falsely (and, really, deceptively) attach oneself to a group (like when a politician says "hard times await us" in his public ...