0
votes
0answers
60 views

Part of speech of “that”?

In this sentence: Its shape resembles that of a kangaroo’s hind foot. What part of speech would that be?
0
votes
4answers
357 views

What do you call someone who is above average?

Is there any word (noun?) for a person who is not bad at doing something, yet not too good?
1
vote
2answers
874 views

Noun order: “He and we…” or “We and he…”? Similarly, “…him and us” or “…us and him”?

It's convention and polite to always list yourself last in a list. I say "John and I went to the store" and not "I and John went to the store." So does that mean that I should always list myself ...
11
votes
3answers
658 views

Where did the practice of using apostrophes for possessive nouns but not pronouns originate?

Where did the practice of using apostrophes for possessive nouns but not pronouns originate? For example, possessive nouns (both proper and common) are written with a apostrophe before the final s: ...
1
vote
0answers
30 views

“Thank you for your coming” and “Thank you for your understanding” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Thank you for coming” and “Thank you for your coming” The first one seems ungrammatical, as pointed by some of native speakers. But the latter ...
1
vote
2answers
6k views

“Thank you for coming” and “Thank you for your coming”

Consider "Thank you for coming" and "Thank you for your coming". Would the latter one be grammatical? Why? Is it possible to recognize latter "coming" as noun? Some say you need no pronoun because it ...
1
vote
0answers
83 views

Identifying the implied gender of nouns [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Referring to objects as “she” English officially does not have genders like German or other languages; for example, a chair is an it, not a he or she. ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

“See you all” or “see you everyone”

When leaving from work, how to say "see you" to colleagues? Which one is appropriate, "see you all" or "see you everyone"?
0
votes
1answer
3k views

Do the adjectives always precedes the noun or pronoun? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why do some adjectives follow the nouns they modify? Attributive and predicative position of an adjective “A place nearby” but not “A place good” ...
8
votes
1answer
213 views

What is it called when an antecedent noun follows the pronoun?

Here is the example that raised the question in my mind: He was splashing, enjoying the jungle's great joys, when Horton the elephant heard a small noise. Here, He refers to Horton; but one ...