A pronoun is a word that can function by itself as a noun phrase.

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What is “its” referring to?

In the following sentence, what is “its” referring to?  “SomeSystem” or “their own proprietary software product”? Company X, from Germany, takes the role of a remote provider and integrates ...
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22 views

Proper pronoun usage: It or That?

Suddenly I came up with this question. (assuming when somebody and I are talking about mobile phone bandwidth) my limit is 7gb. I often exceed it after 15th, then need to pay extra for better ...
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48 views

How does “I never had nothing” mean “I never had anything”? [duplicate]

In a BBC Documentary about Brexit, an interviewee stated his reason for voting out as following: We are giving to some of the eastern Europeans who come in here at that time. they have more priority ...
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55 views

Choosing between objective and subjective pronouns

Which of the following sentences uses the correct pronoun forms and why? My parents met in Havana -- him an artist and her a singer. My parents met in Havana -- he an artist and she a singer.
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55 views

they said “it's” the best? [on hold]

I am wondering whether you find the following dialogue flows well: A: How's the steak? B: It's juicy and tender. A: Yeah. No wonder they (= staff at the restaurant) said it's the best. The pronoun ...
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40 views

What does 'one' in this sentence refer to?

The past decade has seen a growing public fascination with the complex “connectedness” of modern society. At the heart of this fascination is the idea of a network – a pattern of interconnections ...
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20 views

Singular and plural ambiguity of the noun “trio”

According to dictionary.com, a trio is defined as "any group of three persons or things". trio noun, plural trios. any group of three persons or things. Trio is a singular noun that ...
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37 views

Why “It is raining?” instead of “Rain is coming”? [closed]

People will normally say, "It's raining". Why can't it be, "Rain is coming?"
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30 views

Regarding the usage of solicit [closed]

Is the following sentence correct: The manager did not get upset because he solicited an excuse for him. Note: "he" in the aforementioned sentence refers to the manager, while "him" refers to ...
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Mayoral Pronoun; it or he/she

Recently I have heard both of the following sentences: The previous mayor was a woman, wasn't she? The mayor is male, isn't it? These seem to me to bear a gender contradiction here; "the ...
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22 views

Them - Themselves? [migrated]

Here is the sentence I am struggling to make sure it is correct. What pronoun is correct- them to themselves or as written? Thanks But my friends love being them, and I love them being them, but I ...
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44 views

How should I understand the pronoun “they” in this sentence?

The following is a transcript from Scientific American. If you were searching for a life form unlike anything known to science, where would you look? Scientists at Charles University, in Prague, ...
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75 views

Correct pronoun for “baby”

Stumbled along the use of the feminine pronoun for "baby". Previously, I've used it and singular they when the sex of the baby is unknown. Is it correct to use the feminine pronoun (she) for "baby" ...
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“SALLY had been the first one to greet PAULINA when SHE appeared in the doorway” Pronouns

I read the following sentence and I thought the pronoun "she" could refer to either the subject or the object of the sentence. Sally had been the first one to greet Paulina when she appeared in ...
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27 views

as you see them in some movies

Which one should one use a. Patients in mental asylums are not dressed as you see in some movies. b. Patients in mental asylums are not dressed as you see them in some movies. Many thanks.
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52 views

Use of a pronoun to refer to something that follows

This is the opening sentence from the Edgar Allan Poe short story 'The Facts In The Case Of M. Valdemar'. Of course I shall not pretend to consider it any matter for wonder that the extraordinary ...
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Possessive pronouns

Does a first-person possessive pronoun have to come last if it is in a list with others?" "My irresponsible sister loves jewelry, so she took both Sally's and mine. "The same room was marked ...
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32 views

What reflexive pronoun should I use if don't know the gender?

I am writing something for university and I am talking about how a patient might hurt... himself/herself? itself? (talking about the patient) If it was something informal I would use themselves but ...
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3answers
122 views

Is “My dog can run much faster than I” correct? [duplicate]

I have been revisiting English grammar lessons for a test & I'm reading Pronouns. During a self test I came across this sentence "My dog can run much faster than ___". I selected "me" & ...
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26 views

“It wasn't me …” or “It wasn't I …”? [duplicate]

Which of the following usage is correct, grammatically? a) It wasn't I who did this project. b) It wasn't me who did this project.
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56 views

Learn the guitar vs. learn guitar [duplicate]

I'm having a debate with a friend who teaches music. In English we say learn music or learn programming but when it comes to guitar, I feel tempted to say learn the guitar instead of learn guitar. Is ...
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59 views

Why isn't the objective case of the pronoun used in the given sentence? [duplicate]

"It is not we who are stupid," answered the camel-men, "but you." I would say that sentence should be "It is not us who are stupid", because it is usual practice to use objective case after verbs ...
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29 views

Where vs when - a matter of place or one of… time [duplicate]

Educated by weaklings, idolators of stigmata, especially fragmentary ones, we belong to a clinical age when only cases count. This is a quote from E.M. Cioran's book ''All Gall Is Divided'' (...
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Very confused!, what is the difference between “Impersonal Pronoun” & “Indefinite Pronoun”?

Oxford Dictionary say, Indefinite Pronoun: a pronoun that does not refer to any person or thing in particular, for example ‘anything’ and ‘everyone’ Source Impersonal Pronoun: a pronoun (in ...
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53 views

'None' and 'No one' [closed]

Do we use a plural verb with 'none' and a singular verb with 'no one'? We may say: None but the brave deserve accolades. But when we use 'no one', it is grammatically correct to say that 'No one ...
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47 views

Do intensive pronouns ever convey new information? [duplicate]

So for instance, the sentence 'I myself am called James' is not different to 'I am called James', information wise. As a comparative measure, take the sentences, which make use of reflexive pronouns '...
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What type of pronoun shoould I use before a gerund? [duplicate]

While reviewing grammar, I came upon this sentence: "I was able to inspect the apartment without his noticing the movement of my eyes." However, this phrasing seems awkward, especially the "his". I ...
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57 views

In poetry, what can I use to refer to someone without gender?

I am translating a poem from Korean. The poet is deliberately avoiding a gender reference (or, deeming it unnecessary) by using a neutral impersonal pronoun. In Korean there are generally few inbuilt ...
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57 views

Me, myself or I in non-I clause

MS Word is underlining the word myself and I am now wondering if I should be using me instead, seeing as the subject is not I. Which one is correct? Are both possible? At this point, putting as ...
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Non-moderate words

What is a non-moderate word and are there grammar rules for the treatment of such words? For example, are italics never used for emphasis with "everything," which I've been told is an example of a non-...
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18 views

Should I use an objective pronoun or reflexive pronoun here?

In the sentence, "It reminds me of_." Does one use an objective pronoun, "It reminds me of me." Or a reflexive pronoun, "It reminds me of myself." I would think you would use an objective pronoun ...
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58 views

Usage : Am yet to read those

Conversation : A- I am reading the Harry potter series. B- I am yet to read those. or is it better to use "I am yet to read them" or is there a better alternative?
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What was the purpose of the ethical dative?

I can find examples of its use, but not a rationale. Presumably there was one at some point. What was it for?
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124 views

The deal between “Mary and me” vs. “Mary and I” [closed]

I think "Mary and me," even though it sounds odd to the ear, is correct, but my choice is between: "I've forgotten everything about the deal between Mary and me" and "I've forgotten everything about ...
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27 views

to whom/which, for which

consider the sentence: Sometimes even if we try hard to come up with an idea, the result of "which" carried out is in vain. should it be which or it? Also, how to be able to make sentences with the ...
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44 views

Can pronouns refer to adjectives?

If the following sentence is grammatical, does the pronoun it refer to deceptive? "Marcos was deceptive and it led to his demise." If the above sentence is wrong, then why is the following sentence ...
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27 views

Subject/object of sentence

Am I right in thinking this sentence in today's Irish Times is wrong: "A long-serving employee dismissed by Dunnes Stores after it won an appeal against an award of €67,500 damages to her has been ...
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24 views

Possesive pronoun to use with the interrogative pronoun [duplicate]

When using the interrogative pronoun, 'who', what would the possessive form be? 'Who checks X letterbox every day?'. I feel it ought to be 'his' but some people I know claim it should be 'their', ...
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Is it appropriate not to capitalize “I” if i personally view it as vanity on cultural grounds? [closed]

My native language is Russian, and the first person singular pronoun in Russian is "я". No capitalization. We also have a proverb in our language (and culture), which is literally translated as: "'я' ...
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enough for me to [closed]

1) I am thinking about the time when I had enough hair to comb. 2) I am thinking about the time when I had enough hair to comb it. 3) I am thinking about the time when I had enough hair for me to ...
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26 views

pronoun usage with a preceeding a

What pronouns would you use in the following sentence John and Lou recognized a bear cub. Replacing the proper nouns with a pronoun and then replace bear cub with a pronoun.
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37 views

Can relative pronouns reference each other?

Is it grammatically possible to say something like this?: He was who who he was. It sounds wrong and it surely doesn't make sense, but could it technically work? Thanks
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69 views

How is unjustifiable (falsely attributed) usage of *we* or *us* called? [closed]

I wonder what the name of phenomenon when a speaker uses we or us to falsely (and, really, deceptively) attach oneself to a group (like when a politician says "hard times await us" in his public ...
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427 views

The pronoun, it is popular…why?

I've noticed a shift towards a form of speech that I would love to know more about. It first showed-up in US TV dramas I think, but now it's common to hear it used in everyday conversation. Here are ...
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the basement door

1) We opened the basement door and entered it. 2) We opened the basement's door and entered it. 3) We opened the door of the basement and entered it. Which of the above sentences are correct? It ...
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2answers
122 views

Are houses masculine or feminine? [duplicate]

Ships and boats are referred to using feminine pronouns. Are houses masculine, feminine or neutral? Please provide evidence for your answer, a Google search didn't help me.
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36 views

Correct usage of Personal Pronouns [duplicate]

Which of these is the right way of using a personal Pronoun? (Me vs I) This is I. Einstein the Genius! This is Me. Einstein the Genius! I'm a bit confused since both sound right.
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42 views

Second person pronouns [closed]

Can someone explain to me why do a lot of tweets have second person pronouns? I'm doing research study and it appears that second person pronouns appear the most in tweets.
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Should this sentence use the word “one” or “you”?

Is the sentence One only has to look at the size of Claire’s house to know that you can make a lot of money as a doctor. correct? I'm not sure whether mixing the words "one" and "you" in the ...
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Are pronouns nouns?

In the Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (Huddleston & Pullum 2002) and many other grammars, the English pronouns are viewed as a subcategory of the English nouns. In other grammars, such ...