A pronoun is a word that can function by itself as a noun phrase.

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Avoiding reflexive pronouns

Say, for some reason, it's preferable to avoid pronouns when referring to someone. With most forms of pronouns, it's easy to do so by substituting their name in. Consider: She likes the bread of her ...
2
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1answer
94 views

Is “each” an adverb, pronoun, determiner, or what else?

What do Online Dictionaries Say? Cambridge Dictionaries Online says each is used as an adverb in the following examples: There are five leaflets – please take one of each. Each of the brothers ...
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1answer
66 views

What types of words/phrases are “this” “here” & “they”?

I'm currently doing an analytic essay on my drama coursework (fun.). I'd like to explain how the playwright never reveals the exact setting of the act, by using only phrases such as "this","here", and ...
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3answers
699 views

Why “themselves” instead of “himself” when referring to third-person singular? [duplicate]

I've read today a comment from a UK user that sounded weird to me: so the OP is shooting themselves in the foot here with the tone then. I would have said instead: so the OP is shooting ...
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1answer
28 views

“His” or “My” when describing who I am [closed]

I am wondering which of the below sentence is correct... (if there are other errors, please point them out as well) It is because of these experiences that make me who I am today, a leader who ...
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1answer
58 views

What is the correct pronoun agreement?

Last one I promise but i need someone to double check me please... What is wrong with this pronoun agreement "Whichever of the six players hit the most home runs, they win the contest" or is it ...
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1answer
25 views

What is the correct pronoun for this?

What is the correct pronoun for this sentence "Each car handles differently, depending on how it is pressed" or is it already correct?
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2answers
31 views

What is the correct pronoun?

What is the correct pronoun for this sentence "Erica went to get them from the bakery" or is it already correct?
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1answer
32 views

Pronoun usage: that vs one

I've encountered a sentence on English Wiktionary: The company's 2005 revenue exceeds that of 2004 Can I use one instead of that in the sentence? And that one? And, basically, what is the ...
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2answers
85 views

“Alex and I” vs. “me and Alex” [duplicate]

Is it improper to say "me and Person X"? I always hear it said as "Person X and I", but have personally learned to say "me and Person X". Is there a difference between the two versions and is one of ...
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1answer
29 views

What a pronoun should one use: “you” or “yours”? [duplicate]

This document sets out the rights and responsibilities of [you || yours], the Company, and the concerned third parties. If "the Client's rights" can be rephrased to "the rights of Client", then, ...
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1answer
47 views

subject-verb agreement for singular they [duplicate]

The singular-they is becoming trendy*, and I'm curious about conjugating the verbs for this pronoun. For example, instead of "Jim is over there," is it correct to say "They are over there," or "They ...
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Substituting 'many a …' with a pronoun

Consider the sentence: Many a rose bloomed in the garden. If you had to substitute "many a rose" with a pronoun, what would it be? "Many a ..." takes a singular verb. Does that mean it can be ...
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23 views

Demonstrative Pronouns: This/That – Advanced Usage [duplicate]

When you learn about demonstrative pronouns, it seems like a really simple concept. This/these for nearby (physically, or with regards to time), that/those for distant things. Anywhere you go, online ...
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1answer
163 views

“Your valentine” vs “my valentine”

I am going to send a gift to a far away lady I care a great deal about.I want to write her a card just to tell her I will always be there for her when she needs me, so to speak (not in any sexual ...
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4answers
77 views

Pronoun for meat: it or some?

I feel the following sentence does not sound usual: I like meat. Can I eat it tonight? I think it is more common to say: I like meat. Can I eat some tonight? Is my understanding correct? ...
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3answers
42 views

How to determine the right meaning of 'no not I' ? (1762, UK)

Source: The original Miller of Dee from Bickerstaffe's "Love in a village" (1762) There dwelt a miller, hale and bold, beside the river Dee; He danced and sang from morn till night, no lark so ...
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3answers
70 views

Let's you and I / me be fair with each other

"Let's you and I / me be fair with each other." "Let you and I / me indulge in a little bit of reverie." Is "I" or "me" correct in those sentences? And why?
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1answer
131 views

“None of who’s” vs. “none of whose” [closed]

Is the following phrase grammatical? I seem to recall three people, none of who's names I can remember.
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2answers
56 views

Why should a copula link two noun phrases of the same case?

http://english.stackexchange.com/a/30392/50720 motivated this question: To quote from the clear explanation: The rule for what [Fowler] and others consider technically right is ... that ...
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1answer
35 views

Should even a large number be spelled out when used as a pronoun?

I have learned somewhere (or maybe decided ) that any number used as a pronoun -- that is, X standing alone to represent the already stated group of X nouns -- should be spelled out, no matter how big ...
2
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1answer
45 views

fare thee well - grammar

Why is this sentence using 'thee' (which is, afaik the oblique case) and not 'thou'? The second person singular -in this case- should be the subject, i thought. The subject is the one doing the ...
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2answers
74 views

Why are indefinite singular third person pronouns treated as plurals? [duplicate]

It's always bugged me. My research behind this question was rather shallow, so I apologize if it's a duplicates. Thanks! Edit, example: Say you don't know who you are talking to on Reddit, you simply ...
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2answers
76 views

How do you refer to a 'they' character in a poem in a possessive sense?

I am writing a paper about Emily Dickinson's ‘They shut me up in Prose –.’ The two characters of the poem are the speaker and an unidentified group only referred to as 'they' and later as 'themself.' ...
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0answers
36 views

Which personal pronouns take dependent clause and which personal pronouns don't take

Note from The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language - (Page no. 507) i. It is I [who am at fault]. ii. It is me [who is at fault]. Example [i] follows the general rules for ...
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2answers
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Yes, this is she. Who's calling? [duplicate]

I've read in a book that I should "use the subjective case if the pronoun is the complement of the linking verb to be". That is the following sentences are correct: They believed that the thief was ...
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2answers
354 views

“Who are” vs “who is” [closed]

Sentence: it's not what's on the table that matters, but who (is/are) in the chairs. I thought are might be correct because of plural chairs, but family members disagree.
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1answer
44 views

Pronoun Agreement [duplicate]

Lately, I've been trying to understand the use of pronoun agreement in depth. While in the process I came across this website. According to the Author: Professional writers might revise the ...
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3answers
93 views

Using “one” in a sentence multiple times, does it sound right?

I just came across the following sentence in the book "The theory of everything": If one keeps traveling in a certain direction on the surface of the Earth, one never comes up against an ...
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1answer
34 views

Plural or singular [duplicate]

This sentence is from IELTS-teacher Youtube video (time 19:01): A very important aspect of teaching is the ability of the teacher to shape their teaching style to the needs of their students. My ...
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2answers
213 views

Affirmative statements with negative meaning

I was trying to understand indefinite pronouns from this English Grammar Guide site. Everything was going smoothly until I bumped into this paragraph. AFFIRMATIVE STATEMENTS In affirmative ...
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2answers
78 views

Nouns and pronouns [closed]

When I am writing about the United States and refer to "the states", do I say: "states began using their police powers" or "states began using its police powers"?
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1answer
46 views

Saying Hello in the correct way [closed]

May I say, hello it's Rana speaking, or I must say: Hello, I'm Rana speaking? Thanks
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1answer
135 views

Is there a non-transphobic alternative to “he or she”? [duplicate]

For instance, "A politician must be able to think quickly on the spot. He or she must also have no qualms about lying." I know some people who use "they", but as that both sounds and is ...
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1answer
136 views

Is it grammatically correct to use his, her, or his/her? [duplicate]

I've always thought that using the word "his" as a gender-nonspecific pronoun has been acceptable; in recent years, however, I've been told off by people when I do this, saying it is now "politically" ...
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2answers
106 views

What should we use instead of “it” when to emphasize more?

We use it when emphasizing that we refer to one particular thing. For instance, "It is Lawrence you should be talking to". Or, "It was malaria that killed him." What pronoun should we apply when we ...
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1answer
38 views

'It' referring to a totality of more than just one entity

"My father loved to paint. He was a very accomplished amateur painter. Oils-he painted pictures of abandoned mills, and of barns, and of people and sailboats and lighthouses. All of it was ...
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2answers
48 views

Why does it use 'their'?

Every year the Netherlands sends 20,000 tulip bulbs to Canada to thank 'them' for 'their' aid in the Second World War. I understand that them and their is used to say about Canada, Why do they ...
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1answer
58 views

Is correct expression “gone her/him/me”?

I've watched the movie "gone girl". However, I thought that how about "gone her". Then, I'm not sure that correct English expression "gone her". There is the move title, "Despicable me". That word is ...
3
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4answers
631 views

Do you use the masculine or feminine with “victim”? [duplicate]

My mother tongue is Latin-based so I'm used to differences in male/female for neutral words. I don't know how this would work with some words in English. If the "victim" in a sentence is neutral (ie: ...
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3answers
61 views

your or you're? [closed]

Which one is correct? Why? (a) The best gift God has given you was you're precious smile. (b) The best gift God has given you was your precious mile.
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1answer
70 views

Can a sentence begin with an object or reflexive noun?

I'm writing a function (for a game) which converts a sentence with Spivak pronouns into one with pronouns as specified by a user-selected template. For example, the following input sentence: "E ...
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3answers
132 views

Is the sentence given below an example of syntactic ambiguity?

The shelf can support a heavier load compared to the others. Would this sentence be considered ambiguous? To me, the pronoun others could refer to either other shelves or other loads, but I wanted to ...
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2answers
60 views

Repetition of the pronoun “I” [closed]

For an introduction to an essay I'm writing, I say the following: My hand was shaking. I opened the email, and began to read the first line. I only needed to see those first two words: “We’re ...
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9answers
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Is the genderless pronoun “they” appropriate and grammatical for a non-binary gender? [duplicate]

I recently had somebody tell me that a mutual friend of ours who is genderqueer prefers that people refer to him/her using the gender-indefinite pronoun they. In some cases, this almost seems okay: ...
1
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2answers
74 views

who that someone is

"So next time a well-meaning friend offers to ‘speak to someone’, find out who that someone is." - This is from the next to the last paragraph on this site (which is written by New Zealanders, ...
3
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2answers
621 views

Using 'her' vs. 'its' to refer to a country

I am currently reading Liddell Hart's "History of the Second World War", and I'm wondering why he sometimes uses her/she when talking about Japan. In my understanding of English, it should be its or ...
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2answers
81 views

When saying “this one” when referring to yourself, is it first or third person? [closed]

I have been playing a RP forum game and I believe that one of the other players may be locked into first/third person every post he makes. Which one it is doesn't change it from a gameplay view but it ...
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2answers
121 views

Can “own” stand on its own?

My gut feeling tells me that sentences such as Own mistakes have to be dealt with first. Own experience matters the most. We present own results. are not correct, and I would ...
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1answer
75 views

Microsoft word and confusion about himself/he/him

I am writing a small essay and I am confused about how to how to properly express this particular sentence below: Chapter 11 begins with the saint chastising the king who was thinking himself to be ...